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References Alexandrian, Sarane. 1974. Le surréalisme et le rêve. [Surrealism and the Dream.] Paris: Éd. Gallimard. Breton, André. 1967. “Limites non frontières du surréalisme.” [“Limits Not Frontiers of Surrealism.”] In La clé des champs. [The Key to the Fields.], 27-34. Paris: Jean-Jacques Pauvert. Burke, Peter. 2009. Cultural Hybridity. Cambridge: Polity Press. Deréky, Pál. 1992. A vasbetontorony költői. [The Poets of the Ferro-concrete Tower.] Budapest: Argumentum. Jean, Marcel avec la collaboration d’Arpad Mezei. 1959. Histoire de la peinture surréaliste

. (2011) Postcolonial Literature. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited. Lee, J. H., J. Hwang, and A. Mustapha. (2014) ‘Popular Ethnic Foods in the United States: A Historical and Safety Perspective’ Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety 13: 2-16. Long, L. M. (2015) (ed.) Ethnic American Food Today: A Cultural Encyclopaedia. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield. Mintel (2010) Ethnic foods - US - September 2009. London: Mintel Group Ltd. p.4. Marchi, R. (2013) ‘Hybridity and Authenticity in US Day of the Dead Celebrations’ Journal of American Folklore 126

Abstract

Due to his supernatural nature, but also to his place of origin, Bram Stoker’s well-known character, Dracula, is the embodiment of Otherness. He is an image of an alterity that refuses a clear definition and a strict geographical or ontological placement and thus becomes terrifying. This refusal has determined critics from across the spectrum to place the novel in various categories from a psychoanalytical novel to a Gothic one, from a class novel to a postcolonial one, yet the discussion is far from being over. My article aims to examine this multitude of interpretations and investigate their possible convergence. It will also explore the ambivalence or even plurivalence of the character who is situated between the limit of life and death, myth and reality, historical character and demon, stereotype and fear of Otherness and attraction to the intriguing stranger, colonized and colonizer, sensationalism and palpable fin-de-siècle desperation, victim and victimizer, host and parasite, etc. In addition, it will investigate the mythical perspective that results from the confrontation between good and evil, which can be interpreted not only in the postcolonial terms mentioned above, but also in terms of the metatextual narrative technique, which converts into a meditation on how history and myth interact. Finally, it will demonstrate that, instead of being a representation of history, Bram Stoker’s novel represents a masterpiece of intergeneric hybridity that combines, among others, elements of history, myth, folktale and historical novel.1

Abstract

Theories are processes modelled by thought. When they evolve in time, they are transformed and become new theories. They may cross from one academic discipline to another, then open up to new areas of human knowledge, mixing together the humanities, art, science and even spirituality. The way they are modelled reveals their plasticity and their elasticity is tested in their potential for transfer from one domain to another, while the different contacts they make and mergers they undergo generate a certain hybridity. Plasticity, elasticity and hybridity are the triad which make the transfer of theories possible.

Abstract

Theories are processes modelled by thought. When they evolve in time, they are transformed and become new theories. They may cross from one academic discipline to another, then open up to new areas of human knowledge, mixing together the humanities, art, science and even spirituality. The way they are modelled reveals their plasticity and their elasticity is tested in their potential for transfer from one field to another, while the different contacts they make and mergers they undergo generate a certain hybridity. Plasticity, elasticity and hybridity are the triad which makes the transfer of theories possible.

.” Renaissance Shakespeare: Shakespeare Renaissances . Eds. Martin Procházka, Michael Dobson, Andreas Höfele and Hanna Scolnicov. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2014. 159–69. Print. Kernodle, George Riley. The Theatre in History. Fayetteville, AR, and London: The University of Arkansas Press, 1989. Print. Galatians 3:28. King James Bible. Accessed 24 June 2017. Web. https://biblehub.com/galatians/3-28.htm . Henke, James T. Courtesans and Cuckolds: A Glossary to Renaissance Dramatic Bawdy . New York, NY: Garland Publishing, 1979. Print. Kraidy, Marwan M. Hybridity, or

89 Chapter 4 Hybrid Systems with Impacts Introduction The present subject of investigations is the hybrid systems with impacts in which moments of change of the state of the “continuous” coordinates are not predetermined. I.e., the momentary perturbations causing the switch from a state of differential equations to a new state of differential equations are not regulated in the systems by some independent models of computations. Instead, the moments of impulses result unequivocally from the arrangements of the dynamical system with the impacts. These

63 Chapter 3 Stability of Hybrid Systems in a Metric Space Introduction More general hybrid systems (than the ones of two classes discussed in the previous chapters) consist of heterogeneous subsystems related by interconnection operators [1, 26, 25 etc.]. The concept of generalized time [28, 30] made it possible to unify many results in this field by considering a generalized hybrid system in a metric space [30]. In this chapter, following the concept of this book we will consider hybrid systems with weakly interacting subsystems that are described

Chapter 1 Stability of Hybrid Systems on Time Scale Introduction The classical theory of motion stability unites methods and approaches that allow one to analyze stability of the equilibrium state in a mathematical model or a real process. Such models are, as a rule, systems of ordinary differential equations or partial differential equations. There are a number of monographs and books, which discuss basic approaches to this problem. Chapter 1 provides some concepts from time-scale calculus applied to analyze stability of the DE-model of a hybrid

29 Chapter 2 Stability of Hybrid Systems with Aftereffect Introduction In this chapter, the main attention is focused on the stability analysis of a hybrid system under impulse perturbations in terms of the generalized direct Lyapunov method. The impulse system is a classical hybrid system consisting of a continuous and discrete component. The presence of aftereffect in such a system expands the scope of possible applications in the study of real-world phenomena. Section 2.1 considers statement of the problem of motion stability of a hybrid system with