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irrelevant. The activity of truth-telling in itself is of little or no intrinsic value in this post-truth culture. This article will argue, au contraire, for the foundational importance of the virtue of truth- telling, not only for individual human flourishing but also for human society. 1. Dangerous Times In the introduction to her work entitled The Death of Truth Michiko Kakutani notes “Two of the most monstrous regimes in human history came to power in the 20th century, and both were predicated on the violation and despoiling of truth, upon the knowledge

Abstract

The word “utopia” was coined by Thomas More and refers to the unreal and ideal state described in his Utopia, first published in 1516. Following the example of Plato’s Republic, More as well as other thinkers and writers of the 16th and 17th century reflect on the political relevance of utopia and provide unique accounts of ideal, just, and perfect “no places”, as paradigms and standards of social, political, and religious reformation of the coeval world. However, the political significance of utopia relies on a basic anthropological feature, which incidentally is already underlined by More: the relationship between imagination and experience. This means that: 1) the human being’s “eidetic” freedom is characterised by the inseparable relationship between imagination, reflection, experience and action; 2) utopia is capable of disclosing the transformative and normative features related to the human being’s constitution; 3) utopia can be fruitfully used to motivate human will and mobilise support for human flourishing. In this article I endeavour to show that among contemporary philosophers it is Hans Jonas who most fully develops the anthropological significance of utopia by investigating the very relationship between imagination and experience, and by underlining how the eidetic and reflective constitution of the human being leads to ethics. As a further goal, I wish to highlight that the anthropological relevance of utopia can shed light on our imaginative and ambivalent nature, and provide a practical and educational basis for the achievement of an “ethics of images” for the current digital era. For this purpose I shall draw on the thinking of Marie-José Mondzain and Jean-Jacques Wunenburger, among other scholars.

Different Perspectives of Physician and Patient. Dordrecht: Kluwer. Toombs, S.K. (2001). Introduction: Phenomenology and Medicine. In S. Kay Toombs (Hrsg.). Handbook of Phenomenology and Medicine (S. 5-10). Dordrecht: Kluwer. Toombs, S.K. (2006). Vulnerability and the Meaning of Illness: Reflections on Lived Experience. In C. Taylor & R. dell’Oro (Hrsg.). Health and human flourishing: Religion, Medicine, and Moral Anthropology (S. 119-140). Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press. Zaner, R.M. (2006). A Meditation on Vulnerability and Power. In C. Taylor & R. dell

Human Flourishing [online]. [cit. 2017-04-07]. Available at <http://faith.yale.edu/sites/default/files/robinson_1.pdf>. Robinson, M., 2008. Home. New York: Picador. Robinson, M., 2014. Lila. New York: Picador. Robinson, R. 2015. “Books & the Arts. Bringing the Wind Inside.” In The Nation, 26 January, 2015, pp. 27-30. Schmidt, D. W. 2014. “In the name of the father: male voice, feminist authorship, and the reader in Gilead.” In Renascence, vol. 66, no. 2, pp. 119-130. Stephen, L. G. (no year). The Relationship between Fiction and Spirituality. [cit. 2017

. Lawson's politico-philosophical and ethical ideas are centred around the conception of human flourishing, and the feasibility of its attainment via the removal of political and legal obstacles hindering its progress. Although not every reader will agree with all the details and applications into political philosophy, monetary theory and legal theory of Lawson's general approach he provides in this book, those more applied chapters are, nevertheless, full of inspiration and gen- eral interest, and worth reading for anybody. The more abstract chapters, on the

., & Külekci, M. K. (2016). Evaluating lifewide learning habits of academicians for sustainable development. Discourse and Communication for Sustainable Education , 7 (2), 132–143. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1515/dcse-2016-0021 Stevens, R., Petermans, A., & Vanrie, J. (2016). Design for human flourishing in architecture: Programmatic writing as a way to design socio-cultural affordances. Proceedings – D and E 2016: 10 th International Conference on Design and Emotion – Celebration and Contemplation , (September). Strachan, G. (2018). Can education for sustainable

complex dynamics of human flourishing. American Psychologist, 60(7), 678-686. Habermas, J. (1990) Moral consciousness and communicative action. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Huebner, E. S. (1991). Further validation of the studentsí life satisfaction scale: The independence of satisfaction and affect ratings. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 9(4), 363-368. Huppert, F. A., & So, T. T. C. (2013). Flourishing across Europe: Application of a new conceptual framework for defining well-being. Social Indicators Research, 110(3), 837-861. Diener, E., Suh, E. M., Lucas, R. E

allow for correct classification, assessment, and treatment. From Professor Graham’s book we learn that to understand the land of the mentally unsound also involves being able to draw a moral psycholog- ical model of human flourishing —one that preserves dignity and self- respect. The Disordered Mind will definitely be of interest to philosophy undergraduates and to anyone interested in a philosophical account of the fine balance between sanity and insanity. It is written in an engag- ing and accessible way for students, yet its contributions will also appeal to

, identifying the underlying causal patterns that allow for correct classification, assessment, and treatment. From Professor Graham’s book we learn that to understand the land of the mentally unsound also involves being able to draw a moral psycholog- ical model of human flourishing —one that preserves dignity and self- respect. The Disordered Mind will definitely be of interest to philosophy undergraduates and to anyone interested in a philosophical account of the fine balance between sanity and insanity. It is written in an engag- ing and accessible way for students

certain to have something that deserves our admiration and respect, even if it is accompanied by much that we have to abhor and reject.” ( Taylor 1994 , 72-73). On the other hand, even if we acknowledge the intrinsic value of cultures, it does not necessarily mean that all cultures have equal value. Brian Barry wrote: “... some cultures ... are better than others: more just, more free, more enlightened, and generally better adapted to human flourishing” (Barry 2001, 267). So, following Taylor, cultures are valuable because they provide “horizons of meaning,” but – as