Search Results

1 - 10 of 29 items :

Clear All
Yamnaya Culture Hoard of Metal Objects, Ivanivka, Lower Murafa: Autogenesis of ‘Dniester Copper/Bronze Metallurgy’

Abstract

In 2015 near the village of Ivonivka, Mohyliv-Podilskyi Region, Vinnytsia Oblast, a hoard of copper objects was found by chance by the River Murafa. The majority of objects belonging to the hoard were fashioned out of a rather pure copper with a combination of admixtures, which can be named ‘the Ivonivka group’.

Open access
Unused contemporary report about the Podmokly hoard

Abstract

The hoard of Celtic coins found in Podmokly (Rokycany district, west Bohemia) in 1771 is extraordinary by its scope and content, and it attracted intensive attention of many numismatists in the past. The story was also transformed into a nonfiction book. The author of this article brings to light a new unpublished record from the memorial book of the Roman-Catholic parish in Zvíkovec, where the location of Podmokly used to belong to. This report was cited by the local priest Václav Krolmus (1790–1861) in his chronicle together with comparison of prices of some selected agricultural products. The limited information about the finding context of the hoard in the known sources is compared with this newly published report.

Open access
Hoard of Bohemian and Meissen bracteates found in Natternberg (local part of Deggendorf, Lower Bavaria)

Abstract

Around 1950, during the forestry works near Natternberg (local part of Deggendorf, Lower Bavaria), some 26 bracteates were found. Only in 2012, the grandson of the finder reported the hoard and passed it for documentation to the Staatliche Münzsammlung München. Later on, the coins were returned to the owner and then sold in the numismatic auction. The Bohemian part is represented by three large bracteates struck under King Ottokar I of Bohemia (1192–1193, 1197–1230) during the last decade of his rule (cat. nos. 1–3). The Meissen coins are represented by 23 large bracteates struck (cat. nos. 4–26) under Margrave Henry III the Illustrious (1221/1230–1288) during the first decade of his rule. The hoard was buried in Natternberg very likely sometimes around 1230. Appearance of the Bohemian and Meissen bracteates is quite rare in Lower Bavaria, the twosided pfennigs from Regensburg and Passau circulated there predominantly. But it is still possible to think about their transfer from Bohemia, most likely from the Sušice surroundings, which was, as a possession of the Bavarian Counts of Bogen at that time (from the 12th century until 1242), connected through Gunther’s path with Deggendorf surroundings. The hoard could represent a separated part of a larger cash of a tradesman, which was possibly intended for hiding because of the forced exchange in the local markets.

Open access
A hoard of the Prague grossi from Stará Boleslav (Praha-východ district) II

Abstract

In connection with the earlier article published in 2012 which discussed the hoard of 57 Prague grossi discovered between March 2010 and May 2012 in the field to the north of Stará Boleslav – a historical city and a pilgrimage place situated about 20km to the north-east of Prague – the author presents the missing part of the hoard which was not published in the original article. It includes twelve Prague grossi and four parvi struck under John of Luxembourg. With these additional coins, the entire hoard covers thirteen previously known varieties of the Prague grossi and adds one new variety (no. 11 in the survey table). In order to determine the approximate burial date of the hoard, the author takes into account the assumed production period of the latest variety – Castelin VIII. 47 – and concludes that the hoard could have been buried at some point during the late 1340s or early 1350s. As for the actual reason of depositing, common form of money thesaurisation is assumed, most likely by a resident of Stará Boleslav or a pilgrim visiting the town. At the time of the assumed depositing, the place had already played a role of an important pilgrimage centre for several centuries.

Open access
Golden hoard found in Prague-Josefov, U starého hřbitova No. 248. Notes to finds of ducats from the pre-Jagiellon period in Prague

Abstract

The hoard was discovered before Christmas in 1928 during additional demolition of the foundations of the Jewish hospital, under its foundations, very close to the Jewish cemetery in Prague-Josefov. It used to consist of at least 33 gold coins in a clay bowl. Thirty two coins are represented by the Hungarian ducats struck under Sigismund I of Luxembourg (1387–1437) in Buda (18 pcs), Kremnice (Kremnitz, 7 pcs), Košice (Cassovia, 6 pcs) and Velká Baňa (Nagybánya, 1 pc) before 1430, and one coin is English noble struck under Edward III (1327–1377) in Calais. The hoard is one of three known hoards from Prague with gold issues dating back to the pre-Jagiellon period. It was hidden under the wall of the building in place where the Jewish settlement expanded. The owners of the house – of various origins – changed quickly, and since 1440, the building has been owned continuously by the Jewish community. In time of the burial of the hoard, the house was very likely owned by the Prague brewmaster called Hanuško from Prague (1418–1429/1431, 1440) or by the saddler called Václav Paznehtík (1429/1431–before 1433). The hoard was not reported by the finders, the police detected them soon, and they were brought to the court and sentenced to jail. The National Museum bought the part of the hoard for the numismatic collection in 1930.

Open access
Thaler of Hieronymus Schlick preserved in the collection of the Museum of East Bohemia in Hradec Králové

Abstract

The thaler of Hieronymus Schlick struck in 1527 is presented in this article. It comes from the hoard discovered in Nové Město nad Metují in 1923. Besides the coin in the Chaura collection, it is apparently the second known specimen of this sort with the name of Louis Jagiellon in its marginal legend. It is possible to say that both pieces were evidently made of the same pair of dies.

Open access
Reconstruction attempt in the case of the hoard of the deniers dating back to the 10th century found near Ústí nad Labem (Based on hand-written notes by E. Fiala)

Abstract

The article offers a partial reconstruction attempt focused on the hoard of the Bohemian deniers struck under Boleslaus II (972–999) discovered in the surroundings of Ústí nad Labem sometimes before 1895. The reconstruction is based on analysis of older literature and the hand-written notes produced by the Czech numismatist Eduard Fiala.

Open access
Bohemian coins of the 15th and the beginning of the 16th centuries found in Budislavice

Abstract

Six Bohemian silver coins described here come from the inheritance of Jiří Sedmík from Prague (1898–1942), a collector and important Czechoslovak diplomat, who participated in the anti-Nazi resistance. He was arrested in 1940 and executed in Berlin-Plötzensee at the end of 1942. Based on previously published data, some 70 Bohemian pieces (Prague grossi) were discovered in Budislavice even in 1917. Unfortunately, these coins were finally distributed in the systematic collection of the Museum of West Bohemia, and it is hard to get any information about them. But in 1964, another hoard from Budislavice was deposited in the Museum of West Bohemia. Typologically similar small coins – mostly of Bohemian origin – were of very bad condition. Torso of a vessel, in which the coins used to be buried, has been preserved. Later on, the content of this hoard was studied, and relevant basic data were published here, because of it is not impossible to find another hoard at the mentioned location.

Open access
Coins of the Bohemian type struck under Oldrich of Hardegg in Kłodzko

Abstract

In time of Oldrich of Hardegg († 1536), three small silver denominations copying different coins were produced in Kłodzko. While the pfennigs of the Austrian type are known mainly from hoards in the Austrian territory, the hellers of the Silesian type and the coins of the Bohemian type are documented mostly in the Czech Lands. White coins struck under Vladislaus II Jagiellon (1471–1516) served as prototypes for the copies of the Bohemian type. Issuers of the coins of the Bohemian type in Kłodzko can be easily identified from their marginal legends: there is the name of Oldrich with his title the Count of Hardegg or the Count of Kłodzko legible there. Based on iconographical analysis, analysis of hoards and information from the written sources, it is possible to judge that these coins were struck perhaps in 1512/1513–1514. Because of their extraordinary similarity with official coins, the ruler banned their production starting with March 17, 1514.

Open access
New Moravian deniers of the C 301 type struck under Břetislaus I and found at the Vraclav hillfort

Abstract

Two fragments of extraordinarily rare Moravian deniers of the C 301 type struck under Břetislaus I before 1030 were found during archaeological surface examinations at the Vraclav hillfort (Ústí nad Orlicí district, Pardubice region) in 2006–2016. There is the name of Břetislaus without his princely title on obverse, and the name of St. Clement, the Moravian patron, on reverse. Besides the described fragments, only four specimens of this type are known from foreign hoards (finds). Both fragments from the Vraclav hillfort represent the earliest precisely datable proof of penetration of the Moravian coins into the Bohemian territory.

Open access