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Evaluating the Level of Burnout among Healthcare Professionals

Behavioral Sciences 84: 801–805. Bria, Mara, Băban, Adriana, Dumitraşcu, Dan L. 2012. Systematic Review of Burnout Risk Factors among European Healthcare Professionals. Cognition, Brain, Behaviour. An Interdisciplinary Journal 16: 423–452. Cooper, Cary. 1996. Hot Under the Collar. Times Higher Education Supplement June 21. Davey, Manfy M., Cummings, Greta, Newburn-Cook, Christine V., Lo, Eliza A. 2009. Predictors of Nurse Absenteeism in Hospitals: A Systematic Review. Journal of Nursing Management 17: 312–330. de Jonge, Jan, LeBlanc, Pascale

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Benefits of Motivational Interviewing Application for Patients and Healthcare Professionals

screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment in the perinatal period. AJOG. 2016;215(5):539-47. 15. [ http://easo.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/patientcouncil-a4_v1.pdf . ] Access: 26.09.2018. 16. McKee J. Motivational interviewing: learning a new skill, Pharmacy Times. 2013;April. [ https://www.pharmacytimes.com/publications/directions-in-pharmacy/2013/april2013/motivational-interviewing-learning-anew-skill .] 17. Lindhardt CL, Rubak S, Mogensen O, et al. Healthcare professionals experience with motivational interviewing in their encounter

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The role of attitudes to, and the frequency of, domestic violence encounters in the healthcare professionals’ handling of domestic violence cases

health care services (6) . This provides healthcare professionals with an opportunity to access the victims of domestic violence and offer the appropriate support and help. However, studies show that healthcare professionals often miss the chance to help the victims of domestic violence (7) . Reasons for this vary and can include problems with recognizing the victims of domestic violence and also inappropriate reactions when domestic violence is recognized. In line with that, studies show that clinicians recognize only one out of 20 victims of domestic violence on

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Attitude of future healthcare professionals towards food supplements

Summary

Introduction: The use of dietary supplements has been observed for many years. Unfortunately, the status of food supplements and main differences between these and drugs remain unknown to most consumers.

Objective: The purpose of the study was to analyze the opinions of future healthcare professionals on dietary supplements, their behavior concerning food supplementation, as well as their knowledge on the safety of these products.

Methods: The survey was conducted among 354 future healthcare professionals, using a questionnaire composed of 21 items exploring demographic characteristics, knowledge of supplements, reasons for the use of dietary supplement, and recall of the use.

Results: All respondents knew that the purpose of using these products is supplementation. A vast majority of respondents (83.9%) thought that a diet with no supplementation is possible or probably possible. 49.4% of respondents (n=175) declared taking food supplements. The most commonly used ones (68.6%) were products recommended during illness and used to improve the condition of skin, hair, and nails. Moreover, dietary supplements mentioned by students included those containing herbal ingredients, such as: Equisetum arvense, Allium sativum, Panax ginseng, and Ginkgo biloba. Most of respondents buy dietary supplements at pharmacies (89.14%).

Conclusions: Use of dietary supplements is widespread among students. Future healthcare professionals have a better knowledge on food supplementation than population of Poland in general, however, they still need good education in this matter.

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EFOMP project on the role of biomedical physics in the education of healthcare professionals

EFOMP project on the role of biomedical physics in the education of healthcare professionals

The policy statements describing the role of the medical physicist (and engineer) published by organizations representing medical physics (and engineering) in Europe include the responsibility of providing a contribution to the education of healthcare professionals (physicians and paramedical professions). As a consequence, medical physicists and engineers provide educational services in most Faculties of Medicine / Health Science in Europe. In 2005, the EFOMP council took the decision to set up a Special Interest Group to develop the role of the medical physics educator in such faculties and to work with other healthcare professional groups to produce updated European curricula for them. The effort of the group would provide a base for the progress of the role, its relevance to contemporary healthcare professional education and provide input for future EFOMP policy documents regarding this important aspect of the role of the medical physicist. The present communication will present the group, summarise its latest research and indicate future research directions.

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Health Status of Healthcare Professionals Working in an Institute for Chronically Ill Psychiatric Patients

Abstract

Several research works in the related international literature on sociology and health sciences deal with the state of health in one selected population. In these studies, the chosen sample is often connected with special jobs, especially with healthcare professionals and their working conditions. These studies predominantly examine the self-rated subjective health status using questionnaires. There are others that assess the state of health based not only on self-rated subjective indicators, but also using objective data gained by measuring. Considering the international experiences, we chose a special population in our research – healthcare professionals working in an institute for chronically ill psychiatric patients. Our choice was influenced by the fact that we wanted to include their unique working conditions when exploring and assessing their health status. Moreover, our approach was to assess the objective state of health alongside the subjective factors, as our hypothesis was that the majority of the indicators presumably coincided. The data were collected with the help of three questionnaires and some indicators of the objective health statuses were measured. The findings were processed using the SPSS 17.0 mathematical-statistical software package. Following the descriptive statistics, we applied hierarchic cluster-analysis based on results of the WHOQOLD-BREF26 life-quality questionnaire, the WHO WBI-5 Well Being Index, and on the body composition analysis. The results show the objective and subjective health status of population and the factors that influenced it; the working conditions and the interpersonal contacts in the workplace. The conclusion was that in the examined population the subjective and objective health status doesn’t coincide.

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Healthcare professionals’ evaluation of interprofessional teamwork and job satisfaction / Evaluation der Teamarbeit und der Arbeitszufriedenheit von Gesundheitsfachberufen

Abstract

Interprofessional teamwork among healthcare professionals in healthcare organizations is a key factor for both their job satisfaction and patients’ effective and efficient treatment. One precondition for successful interprofessional teamwork is a shared mental model (a common cognitive frame of reference and knowledge) of working together as a team. However, there often exist subcultures, and each of these has its own mental model of teamwork. Hence, it can be assumed that different healthcare professional groups do not share the evaluation of their interprofessional teamwork and job satisfaction (Hypothesis 1). Additionally, based on the input-process-output model of team effectiveness, it can be expected that interprofessional teamwork determines job satisfaction (Hypothesis 2). These hypotheses were tested in a survey of 272 employees in 15 rehabilitation clinics in Germany. Results showed that healthcare professionals’ evaluation of their interprofessional teamwork (F(3, 203) = 9.118, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.119) as well as their job satisfaction (F(3, 210) = 3.357, p = 0.02, η2 = 0.046) differed significantly. Physicians reported the highest level of interprofessional teamwork and job satisfaction compared with other groups. Perceptions of interprofessional teamwork explain approximately 20% of the variance in job satisfaction. Thus, both hypotheses were confirmed. Interprofessional interventions in education and practice are recommended to establish a shared mental model, which could improve teamwork and subsequently job satisfaction.

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Solving medical mysteries: hidden stresses and unexplained symptoms

1 Psychophysiologic Disorders In primary care, 25-33% of patients suffer from illness not fully explained by diagnostic tests. In these patients, pain or other symptoms (often more than one) can affect almost any structure, organ system or body region. There is growing evidence from controlled trials that addressing psychosocial problems in this population leads to significantly improved outcomes. However, few healthcare professionals have had formal training about the link to stressful issues. Clinicians who are familiar with these connections can

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Bulgarian Experience with Adverse Drug Reaction Reports from Patients and Consumers – Retrospective Data-base Study

, Naseva E, et al. Physicians’ knowledge and attitude towards adverse event reporting system and a result to intervention – randomized nested trials among Bulgarian physicians. Med Glas (Zenica) 2013;10(2):365-72. 5. Bulgarian Drug Agency Annual Reports 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. Available from: http://www.bda.bg/en/about-bda#annual-reports 6. Rolfes L, van Husel F, van der Linden L, et al. The quality of clinical information in adverse drug reaction reports by patients and healthcare professionals: a retrospective comparative analysis. Drug Saf 2017

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The Perinatal Loss Care Educational Programme and Its Evaluation

( 4 ) and describe the support and care of bereaved parents as demanding and complicated ( 5 , 6 ). Working with bereaved parents is an immense challenge for professionals in the field of perinatal care and requires a high level of knowledge and skill. Positive attitudes in healthcare professionals toward care for parents who suffered perinatal loss are associated with previous education in the field of care for bereaved parents, support of a dedicated bereavement team, and hospital policy supporting the care for bereaved parents ( 7 , 8 ). Most professionals

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