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Abstract

In this paper we will present the concept of Protestant Work Ethics as conceptualized and measured by several authors, starting with its initiator, Max Weber, in order to emphasize the importance of work ethic on attitudes towards work. We will also analyze the four dimensions of work ethic - hard work, nonleisure, independence and asceticism, identified by Blau and Ryan (1997) among military students, trying to identify how they vary according to a series of socio- demographic data of military students.

through the complex field of Translation Studies, and of Bible translation, in particular. The method of study involves analysis and use of concepts such as the paradox of translation, dynamic equivalence and (essentially) literal translation, in a dialog with authors such as Ricoeur, Berman, Nida or Ryken. This analysis shows that a linguistic oikumene, as a step towards a commonality of faith, is achievable through the translator’s hard work of producing linguistic hospitality, as a sine qua non condition for making our home, our language warm enough for the

Abstract

The issue of women with bleeding disorders was first reported by Professor von Willebrand in 1926, but it is only from around the mid 1990s that the issue has been fully recognised. Much of this is due to the vision and hard work of Professor Christine Lee and colleagues at the Katharine Dormandy Haemophilia Centre. This work has led to better diagnosis, better quality care and improved quality of life for women with bleeding disorders.

Abstract

The research question is the relationship between the local community and globalization tendencies and transformation or maintenance of local traditions. The research area is a specific locality of a Czech village in Romanian Banat. The local community has evolved in a relative isolation. Agriculture was the most important activity despite the fact that a mining factory was opened there. Agriculture was and in many features still is traditional, self-supplying, and hard-work. The life-style has always been environmentally friendly as it has been without modern technologies. Nevertheless, modernization exploded dramatically in these villages after 1989, when the communist policies collapsed along with Romania's isolation. People from the Czech Republic have rediscovered Romanian Banat and a rather busy (agro) tourism has developed there. The Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs supports development projects for making living conditions in the village better. Simultaneously, strong migration from Banat to the Czech Republic has started. People find living conditions in the Czech Republic easier and leave hard work, poverty and unemployment. It brings huge land cover changes because people who remain cannot use all arable land, which is thus abandoned and left for the natural process. One of the distinct manifestations of globalization tendencies is the build-up of wind power plants.

Abstract

The belief that hard work can lead to advancement in a society stands as a key motivation for migrating. The literature on migration, however, has viewed meritocratic attitudes in a different light, arguing that a belief in a meritocratic society can cause migrants to be more accepting of inequalities and blind them to structural explanations of it. To add to this debate, I therefore study whether migrants generally perceive their recipient countries to be meritocracies or not, as well as what can explain these attitudes. I answer these questions using a survey collected among nine migrant groups in Denmark, the Netherlands and Germany. The results show that all the migrant groups perceive the three recipient countries as meritocratic, though there are differences among the groups. The article further studies what these variations in the belief in the meritocratic society can be explained by.

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Editorial

The year 2010 is not gone yet but we already know that this year will be associated with one of the biggest losses in pharmacology and toxicology. On Tuesday, April 13, 2010, at the age of 97, one of the most influential pharmacologists in Eastern Europe, Professor Helena Rašková has left us. Her wisdom, generosity, kindness and hard work made it possible to create a positive environment for research and education, although sometimes she had to fight hard. Her incredible story "How I became a Pharmacologist" wroted by Prof. Rašková herself documents how rich and inspirational her life was [Rašková H. (1997). Pharmacology & Toxicology 80: 255-261]. In this issue you will find mostly works of her colleagues and friends who would like to pay homage to the mother and grandmother of Czecho-Slovak pharmacology and toxicology and to the wonderful person who Prof. Helena Rašková was. She touched many people in her lifetime, affected many and will truly be missed.

Abstract

The aim of the article is to present a very important phenomenon affecting human integrity and homeostasis that is Threat Prediction Process. This process can be defined as “experiencing apprehension concerning results of potential/ actual dangers,” (Mamcarz, 2015) oscillating in terminological area of anxiety, fear, stress, restlessness. Moreover, it highlights a cognitive process distinctive for listed phenomenon’s. The process accompanied with technological and organization changes increases number of health problems affecting many populations. Hard work conditions; changing life style; or many social and political threats have influence on people’s quality of life that are even greater and more dangerous than physical and psychological factors, which, in turn, have much more consequences for human normal functioning. The present article is based on chosen case studies of a qualitative analysis of threat prediction process

Abstract

Human skeletal remains from past populations are an invaluable source to objectively study biological history. The combined biological and cultural assessment of bioarchaeology offers a unique perspective on the adaptation of people to their environment. This study summarizes a portion of ongoing work to decipher trends related to health and lifestyle in early medieval (XI-XII c.) Giecz, Poland. The skeletal assemblage from Giecz, the “Giecz Collection”, represents a community positioned at a major center of political, economic, and religious power during this important time in Polish history. Non-violent traumatic injuries were investigated to elucidate trends related to possible types and rigor of activities and linear femoral growth trends were analyzed to assess patterns of stress. Preliminary results suggest that all members of the community (men, women, and adolescents) contributed to a lifestyle characterized by repetitive hard-work. Furthermore, it appears that most individuals suffered from health insults negatively affecting their development and perhaps their mortality.

Abstract

Individual in-depth, semi-structured interviews with three mathematics teachers were conducted to investigate the dynamics of their life-long relationships with mathematics, synthesised as mathematical identity from different identity positions in the context of dialogical self. The qualitative data were scrutinised employing interpretive phenomenological analysis that displayed mostly positive instrumental relationships with mathematics and explicit connections between the teachersí life experiences and their disctinct identity voices that surfaced in interviews. Similarly, teachers appeared to be experts in different professional spheres: pedagogy, subject or didactics. The teachersí accounts contain various models of relationships between the other-motive and the self-motive as reflected in their pedagogical approaches. Emergent patterns resulting from the interaction of the teachersí mathematical identity and their perception of studentsí mathematical philia/phobia included the humanistic approach with an instrumental interpretation of mathematics and its teaching methods, self-actualisation in achieving success in mathematics through hard work and the issue of attribution of failure in mathematics either to external or internal factors. Moreover, these dialogical models and interactive patterns show alignement with one of the core competences for educators in education for sustainable development, that is, achieving transformation in what it means to be an educator, in teaching and learning, as well as in the entire education system. Practical implementation of findings and limitations of the study are outlined along with venues for future research.

Abstract

The development of the four language skills has always been hard work for teachers as well as for students, the writing skill being a particularly challenging one. Writing in English for achieving various goals is certainly a major activity of all civilian and military higher education institutions throughout the world. In their daily activities, army leaders convey their intent, ideas, purpose and vision to superior echelons, peers and subordinates in oral or written form. Military officers perform many of their duties by means of intelligible, concise, coherent, and meaningful written messages. The need for writing correctly is an absolutely indispensable skill in itself. Therefore, teachers working in the military system of education should be concerned with developing, improving and practising the writing skill which is an important quality of leadership. Military work is very complex, the military system being based on officers’ ability to lead and manage military organizations. The paper focuses on the specific characteristics of military writing and provides some formats, with the respective writing tasks and assignments.