Search Results

1 - 10 of 61 items :

  • "foreign language education" x
Clear All

language education of seniors. JoLaCE, 4(1), 158-179. Hupková, M., Zimermanová, M. (2013). Sociálno-psychologický výcvik pre seniorov v kontexte celoživotného vzdelávania. In Vzdělávání dospělých - příležitosti a úskalí v globalizovaném světě (p. 263-274). Praha: Educa Service. Jaroszewska, A. (2009). Uczenie sie jezyków obcych jako jedna z form samorealizacji ludzi starszych. Lingwistyka Stosowana, 2009(1), 115-125. Retrieved from: https://portal.uw.edu.pl/documents/7276721/11229533/LS1_2009_art_Jaroszewska.pdf Jedličková, P. (2014). Edukácia zdravotne znevýhodnených

, Ingrid, and Ursula Neumann, eds. StreitfallZweisprachigkeit. The Bilingualism Controversy. Wiesbaden: VS-Verlag. 2009. Gogolin, Ingrid. “The Challenge of Super Diversity for Education in Europe”. Education Inquiry 2.2 (2011): 239-49. Gomez-Peña, Guillermo. The New World Border . New York: New York University Press, 1996. Guilherme, Manuela. Critical Citizens for an Intercultural World: Foreign Language Education as Cultural Politics. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 2002. Guilherme, Manuela. “Intercultural Competence”. Encyclopaedia of Language Teaching and

). CALL and Foreign Language Education: e-textbook for foreign language teachers . Nitra: Constantin the Philosopher University. Available at: http://www.klis.pf.ukf.sk/public/S.%20Pokriv%C4%8D%C3%A1kov%C3%A1%20et%20al.%20-%20CALL%20and%20Foreign%20Language%20Education.pdf Rakes, G. C., & Casey, H. B. (2002). An analysis of teacher concerns toward instructional technology. International Journal of Educational Technology , 3(1). Rilling, S., Dahlman, A., Dodson, S., Boyles, C., & Pazvant, O. (2005). Connecting CALL theory and practice in pre-service teacher education

Abstract

This study is of a theoretical-conceptual nature and is a partial outcome of the research project VEGA MŠVVaŠ SR and SAV no. 1/0176/15. It deals with one of the problems currently faced by educational theory and practice, i.e. the foreign language education of seniors. The trend is typical for many EU member states, since it results from the needs of a modern society. In addition to strategic documents, programs and legislation which binds the Slovak Republic to create conditions for lifelong education, including foreign language education, the authors are more closely preoccupied with specificities and possibilities of the language education of seniors, which are explained on a comparative basis with the language education of children and youth. Even though in literature one can find results of many substantial empirical research projects devoted to foreign language education of children and youth, research into the education of adults and seniors in the area of foreign languages falls behind considerably. A sufficient platform for the methodology of language education of adults and seniors in Slovakia has not been created either, if compared with the methodology of language education of younger age categories. This shortcoming is often quite noticeable in practice. The study attempts to pay adequate attention to the analysis of selected teaching styles specific for adult and senior age as well as teaching methods which may be used in the language education of seniors.

Abstract

The paper provides an overview of the forms in which translation is used in foreign language education. A tentative classification is suggested which differentiates between facilitative translation as a supporting process that helps to overcome learning constraints, deliberate translation as an independent task with a predetermined objective that targets learners’ foreign language competence and skills, and simulated translation as an activity from which additional pedagogical benefits regarding learners’ foreign language proficiency can be derived. From the side of the learner, facilitative translation constitutes a complex learning strategy that can be applied for a variety of strategic purposes (memory-related, cognitive, compensatory, metacognitive, affective, and social), while from the side of the teacher it represents a scaffolding tool that can be consolidated into a fully-fledged teaching technique. Deliberate translation can further be differentiated according to the specifics of pedagogical focus. Language-focused translation, targeting learners’ grammatical accuracy or vocabulary range and control, and skill-focused translation, targeting one of the four basic communicative language skills, can be used for both instruction-related and diagnostic purposes. The focus on the holistic use of the available linguistic repertoire results in the two complex uses of translation as an incentive for communication and as a communicative activity aimed at developing the skill of cross-language mediation. A particular type of simulated translation which appears to be particularly suited for the purposes of foreign language education is audiovisual translation.

-112. Byram, Michael. Cultural Studies in Foreign Language Education . Multilingual Matters, 1989. Byram, Michael. Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence. Multilingual Matters, 1997. Canagarajah, Suresh. Reclaiming the Local in Language Policy and Practice . Lawrence Erlbaum, 2005. Gallagher-Brett, Angela. Seven Hundred Reasons for Studying Languages . University of Southampton, Centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies, 2005. Guilherme, Maria Manuela. “The Intercultural Dimension of Citizenship Education in Portugal.” Education for

Abstract

As teachers of English in the military, we totally believe that today’s military should have foreign language skills and cultural expertise besides military competencies, needed to face the challenges of our present security. Foreign languages and cultural awareness can be considered ‘critical capabilities’. But proficiency in a foreign language is difficult to be acquired when you are not allotted sufficient class hours or the linguistic level of your students is pretty low. The English language proficiency training is a complex process involving time as well as human and financial resources. Each army needs literate military in foreign languages that can speak and write, comprehend oral speech or written text, in the literal and figurative forms of the language. Not being able to speak the NATO prime language of communication can be considered a real barrier for any military participant in international missions. The present study is a theoretical approach presenting some priorities in language learning education at home and abroad

Abstract

In order to communicate effectively with people belonging to different social or ethnic groups, any language user is supposed to have not only a good command of the language code involved, but also what is generally known as “intercultural knowledge.” As a consequence, the development of the students' cultural competence is perceived today as a major aim of the foreign language education. Starting from this hypothesis, the paper discusses the manner in which the concept of genre can provide students with insights into cultural expectations of creating a text in both spoken and written English.

Abstract

This paper shows that the flexibility of time as a potential of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) proves the sustainability of its latest stage – Ubiquitous CALL. Firstly, the ideas of the Third Millennium Pedagogy are combined with the ethical and philosophical principles of sustainable education. One of the descriptors of the sustainable education – its durability is then compared with the principle of time flexibility in e-learning. On this theoretical base, the ideas of Ubiquitous Learning in general and Ubiquitous CALL (U-CALL) in particular are developed. Two comparable cases of the research aimed at the time flexibility of e-learning in foreign language education are described. The former one was conducted in 2016, the later in 2008. Similar results in time flexibility prove that e-learning in language education can be omnipresent, fulfilling the demands on Ubiquitous CALL. The durability of time flexibility proven by the real-life examples indicates the sustainability of U-CALL.

Abstract

The present time places considerable demands on the process of foreign language education both in the field of communication and information transfer. Teachers, occupying a pivotal role in this process, are not able to proceed with simple, lay approaches and methods. It has become more and more important to apply sophisticated approaches and methods in teaching which are based on primary and secondary researches. This paper discusses the Dynamic Model of Speech Production as a specific approach to EFL teaching. Furthermore, the application of activating methods in the process of teaching English as a foreign language is examined from the standpoint of gender, country, length of teaching practice, and type of university. The data was collected using a questionnaire about the use and the frequency of occurrence of activating methods, which was completed by 82 university teachers from the Slovak Republic and the Czech Republic.