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Effects of flunixin and florfenicol combined with vitamins E and/or C on selected immune mechanisms in cattle under conditions of adaptive stress

-369. 8. Esfandiari N., Sharma R.K., Saleh R.A., Thomas A.J., Agarwal A.: Utility of the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test for assessment of reactive oxygen species production by seminal leukocytes and spermatozoa. J Androl 2003, 24, 862-870. 9. Frank G.H., Briggs R.E., Duff G.C., Loan R.W., Purdy C.W.: Effects of vaccination prior to transit and administration of florfenicol at time of arrival in a feedlot on the health of transported calves and detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in nasal secretions. Am J Vet Res 2002, 63, 251

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Amphenicols stability in medicated feed – development and validation of liquid chromatography method

, Rio de Janeiro, 2004. p. 375. 13. Hayes J.M.: Determination of florfenicol in fish feed by liquid chromatography. J AOAC Int 2005, 88, 1777-1783. 14. Hayes J.M., Gilewicz R., Freehauf K., Fetter M.: Assay of florfenicol in swine feed: interlaboratory study. J AOAC Int 2009, 92, 340-347. 15. Huet A.C., Fodey T., Haughey S.A., Weigel S., Elliott C., Delahaut P.: Advances in biosensor-based analysis for antimicrobial residues in foods. Trend Anal Chem 2010, 29, 1281-1294. 16. Luo P.J., Cao X.Y., Wang Z

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Detection of antibiotic resistance and classical enterotoxin genes in coagulase -negative staphylococci isolated from poultry in Poland

cage-housed and floor-housed poultry operations. Environ Res 2011, 111, 492–498. 10. Kao S.J., You I., Clewell D.B., Donabedian S.M., Zervos M.J., Petrin J., Shaw K.J., Chow J.W.: Detection of the high-level aminoglycoside resistance gene aph(2″)-Ib in Enterococcus faecium . Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2000, 44, 2876–2879. 11. Kehrenberg C., Schwarz S.: Distribution of florfenicol resistance genes fexA and cfr among chloramphenicol-resistant Staphylococcus isolates. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2006, 50, 1156–1163. 12. Long K.S., Poehlsgaard J

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Identification of bacterial pathogens and determination of their antibacterial resistance profiles in some cultured fish in Turkey

Abstract

Introduction: In the present study, some of the commercial fish farms located in the Black Sea region of Turkey, were screened for bacteria between 2012 and 2014.

Material and Methods: The bacterial agents isolated from fish were identified by classical biochemical tests and the rapid diagnostic tests (API 20 E and API 20 Strep). All strains were further identified by sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The strains were also investigated for resistance to different antimicrobials by the disc diffusion method. Antibiotic resistance genes, including tetracycline (B), β-lactam (ampC, blaTEM, blaPSE), florfenicol (floR), erythromycine (ereA, ereB), sulphonamide (sulI, sulII), and trimethoprim (dhfr1) genes, were determined by the PCR method.

Results: Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio fluvialis, Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida, Pseudomonas luteola, Lactococcus garvieae, Streptococcus iniae, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Yersinia ruckeri were isolated from marine and freshwater cultured fish. According to the results of disc diffusion, all isolates were sensitive to florfenicol, trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole, oxitetracycline, and enrofloxacin, and resistant to lincomycin, penicillin G, and amoxicillin. Also, sulI, sulII, and floR resistance genes were detected in the bacteria.

Conclusion: The results of the study open up the opportunity to perform further investigations which could determine the possible role of ARGs in fish pathogens.

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ELISA validation and determination of cut-off level for chloramphenicol residues in honey

Abstract

An analytical validation of a screening ELISA for detection of chloramphenicol (CAP) in honey was conducted according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and Guidelines for the Validation of Screening Methods for Residues of Veterinary Medicines. The analyte was extracted from honey with a water and ethyl acetate mixture, and CAP concentrations were measured photometrically at 450 nm. The recovery rate of the analyte from spiked samples was 79%. The cut-off level of CAP in honey as the minimum recovery (0.17 units) was established. Detection capability (CCβ) was fixed at 0.25 μg kg−1. No relevant interferences between matrix effects and structurally related substances including florfenicol and thiamphenicol were observed. The ELISA method should be useful for determination of CAP residues in honey monitoring.

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Phenotypic and Genotypic Antimicrobial Resistance of Lactococcus Sp. Strains Isolated from Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss)

Abstract

A current profile of antimicrobial resistance and plasmid of 29 Lactococcus garvieae and one Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from farms throughout Turkey were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G (90%), ampicillin (86.7%), florfenicol (83.3%), amoxicillin (80.1%), and tetracycline (73.4%), and resistant to trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole (86.6%) and gentamycin (46.6%) by disc diffusion method. Twenty-eight (93%) isolates had two to seven antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) determined by PCR. The most prevalent ARGs were tetracycline (tetB), erythromycin (ereB), and β-lactam (blaTEM). Bacterial strains were also screened for plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis and two strains harboured plasmids, with sizes ranging from 3 to 9 kb.

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Analytical strategy for determination of chloramphenicol in different biological matrices by liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry

chloramphenicol and florfenicol in liquid milk, milk powder, and bovine muscles by LC-MS/MS. Food Addit Contam A 2012, 29, 559-570. 9. Rocha Siqueira S.R., Luiz Donato J., de Nucci G., Reyes, F.G.R.: A high-throughput method for determining chloramphenicol residues in poultry, egg, shrimp, fish, swine, and bovine using LC-ESI-MS/MS. J Sep Sci 2009, 32, 4012-4019. 10. Rønning H.T., Einarsen K., Asp T.N.: Determination of chloramphenicol residues in meat, seafood, egg, honey, milk, plasma, and urine with liquid chromatography-tandem mass

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Elimination of Chloramphenicol in Rainbow Trout Receiving Medicated Feed

fish and blue mussels Mytilus edulis in the vicinity of fish farms. Dis Aquat Organ 1994;18:45-51. Dowling PM. Chloramphenicol, thiamphenicol, and florfenicol. In: Giguère S, Prescott JF, Baggot JD, Walker RD, Dowling PM, editors. Antimicrobial therapy in veterinary medicine. 4 th ed. London: Blackwell Publishing; 2006. Lu XW, Dang Z, Yang C. Preliminary investigation of chloramphenicol in fish, water and sediment from freshwater aquaculture pond. Int J Environ Sci Technol 2009

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Chloramphenicol-Induced Alterations in the Liver and Small Intestine Epithelium in Pigs

garlic (Allium sativum) and chloramphenicol on growth performance, physiological parameters and survival of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). J. Venom. Anim. Toxins. incl. Trop. Dis., 12: 172-201. Shea K.M. (2003). Antibiotic resistance: what is the impact of agricultural uses of antibiotics on children’s health? Pediatrics, 112: 253-258. Shen J., Xia X., Jiang H., Li C., Li J., Li X., Ding S. (2009). Determination of chloramphenicol, thiamphenicol, florfenicol, and florfenicol amine in poultry and porcine muscle and liver by gas

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Effect of therapeutic doses of enrofloxacin on circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in pigs

Agents Chemother 1998, 42, 3009-3011. 7. Khalifeh M.S., Amawi M.M., Abu-Basha E.A., Bani Yonis I.: Assessment of humoral and cellular-mediated immune response in chickens treated with tilmicosin, florfenicol or enrofloxacin at the time of Newcastle disease vaccination. Poult Sci 2009, 88, 2118-2124. 8. Khan A.A., Slifer T.R., Remington J.S.: Effect of trovafloxacinon on production of cytokines by human monocytes. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1998, 42, 1713-1717. 9. Lis M., Szczypka M., Suszko A., Świtała M., Obmińska

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