Search Results

1 - 10 of 43 items :

  • "film industry" x
Clear All

Abstract

The article is based on 20 in-depth interviews with women professionals conducted for a more comprehensive study focusing on gender roles within the film and television industry in Turkey. This study examines the career possibilities for women, the experience of being a woman working in television and cinema, and the working environment, including work-life balance issues, experiences of discrimination and experiences of sexism. The hypothesis of this study is that film industry is male-dominated, and women have to struggle to be able to prove themselves in this industry in the 21st century in Turkey, where the position of women is made even more difficult by the gender role codes and the structure of Turkish society.

Abstract

The present study aims to investigate the contribution that actor Edward G. Robinson brought to the American film industry, beginning with his iconic role as gangster Little Caesar in Mervyn Le Roy’s 1931 production, and continuing with widely-acclaimed parts in classic film noirs such as Double Indemnity, The Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street. Edward G. Robinson was actually a Romanian Jew, born Emmanuel Goldenberg in Bucharest, in 1893, a relatively little known fact nowadays. By examining his biography, filmography and his best-known, most successful films (mentioned above), I show that Edward G. Robinson was one of classical Hollywood’s most influential actors; for instance, traits of his portrayal of Little Caesar (one of the very first American gangster films) can be found in almost all subsequent cinematic gangster figures, from Scarface to Vito Corleone. In the same vein, the doomed noir characters he played in Fritz Lang’s The Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street are still considered by film critics today to be some of the finest, most nuanced examples of noir heroes. Therefore, the main body of my article will be dedicated to a more detailed analysis of these films, while the introductory section will trace his biography and discuss some of his better-known films, such as Confessions of a Nazi Spy and Key Largo. The present study highlights Edward G. Robinson’s merits and impact on the cinema industry, proving that this diminutive Romanian Jew of humble origins was indeed something of a giant during Hollywood’s classical era.

Abstract

This article presents the results of a multi-method study carried out by the Tallinn University Centre of Excellence in Media Innovation and Digital Culture (MEDIT). The aim of this study was to investigate how international film professionals perceive the Estonian film industry; what image they have of Estonian film, and how they envision or have experienced Estonia as a destination for production and collaboration. The results of the study indicate that the skills of Estonian filmmakers are increasingly internationally renowned and valued among foreign professionals. At the same time, however, awareness of Estonian film and its nature remains ambiguous to most international film professionals. While seeing Estonia as a Baltic country rather than a Nordic one, the professionals suggested setting up a Baltic film fund and developing a Baltic brand in order to raise international recognition of local film production.

118 Book Review Scandinavian Perspective: Towards a Baltic Film Industry Jan Erik Holst (ed.), Stork Flying over Pinewood: Nordic-Baltic Film Cooperation 1989–2014, Oslo: Kom forlag, 2014, ISBN 978-8293-191-27-8, 158 pp. Reviewed by KARLO FUNK, Estonian Institute, Estonia; email: karlo.funk@einst.ee DOI: 10.1515/bsmr-2015-0027 The idea of Baltic cinema has been standing on unstable if not shaky ground for almost 25 years. Like one of those tem- porary buildings that often are erected out of necessity to fi ll an immediate demand, the con- cept of

, H.-F.; Shannon, S. E. 2005. ‘Three approaches to qualitative content analysis’. - Qualitative Health Research, 15, 1277-1288. Laherand, M.-L. 2008. Kvalitatiivne uurimisviis. Tallinn. Lazzeretti L.; Boix, R.; Capone, F. 2008. Do Creative Industries Xluster? Mapping Creative Local Production Systems in Italy and Spain. Working Paper 08.05. Departament d’Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona. Lorenzen, M. 2007. Creative Encounters in the Film Industry: Content, Cost, Chance, and Collection, Creative Encounters Working Papers No. 3

-Yue G. 2010. Frames of Anime: Culture and Image Building. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press. Iwabuchi, KOichi. 2004. How "Japanese” Is Pok6mon? In Pikachu’s Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall ofPokemon. ed. Joseph Tobin. 53-79. Durham and London: Duke University Press. Kakeo. Yoshio. 2010. The Guide to Japanese Film Industry & Co-Production 2010. <http://unijapan.org/en/project/infonnation/japan-film-industry-guide.html> Last accessed 20. 02. 2015. Lamarre. Thomas. 2006. The Multiplanar Image. In Mechademia I: Emerging Worlds of Anime and Manga, ed. Frenchy

Abstract

Researchers and practitioners have long been intrigued by the role of stars in the film industry (McDonald 2005). Actors with star status can enhance the economic prospects of a film (Wallace et al. 1993). For instance, replacing average stars with top stars has been shown to increase revenue (Nelson, Glotfelty 2012). A meta-analysis of 61 studies collating data from 1545 films has shown the significant effect of commercial star power on Hollywood films’ revenues (Hofmann, et al. 2017). The Hollywood movie industry can be viewed as a system that maintains and regulates the popularity of existing and emerging stars through agents, producers and award systems (McDonald 2013).

Abstract

The video games industry is one of the fastest growing branches of industry, reaching revenues comparable to (or even surpassing, depending on the source) the 70 year older film industry. The growth was not free from turmoil, as the industry faced many disruptive changes, market crashes, fusions and takeovers. High development costs and fierce competition make video games a high-risk business. While it seems obvious that companies in such unstable environment should strive to achieve the highest quality of their products, the uniqueness, variety, complexity, and constant evolution of video games makes common definitions and models of quality difficult to apply. This article provides an overview of problems concerning the application of the term “quality”, it's frameworks and measurement methods to video games.

Abstract

The issues of creative and cultural industries and their role in city branding and development are explored in this paper. Activities enhancing city placement and city branding via a TV series are subject to enquiry. As a result, the city becomes a film-friendly destination, attracting people and firms from the film industry. Besides, the city is perceived more favourably, standing out from the competition and possibly attracting tourists and potential investors and immigrants. Such a policy has been introduced in Łódź, a large Polish post-socialist and post-industrial city. With the city authority’s support, the town has become the location of a popular TV crime series, entitled “Komisarz Alex” (“Inspector Alex”). The main aim of the research was to investigate how Łódź inhabitants perceive the series and what influence they think the film-making would have on the city. The evaluation of the perception of the series is based on structured interviews, and is generally very positive.

Abstract

This article investigates the contradictory information about the Estonian identity of the filmmaker Dimitri Kirsanoff (1899–1957) and examines the archival material that provides final confirmation of his birth and childhood in Tartu. In addition, Kirsanoff’s substantial contribution to silent cinema and his significance in the context of French avant-garde impressionism are discussed. Kirsanoff’s most acclaimed film Ménilmontant (France, 1926) was released 90 years ago. It is still frequently screened all over the world, due to its experimental montage techniques, the early use of handheld cameras, its innovative use of actual locations and the actors’ performances that still resonate with contemporary audiences. Ménilmontant is also influential because of its elliptical narrative style. However, with the advent of sound film, Kirsanoff’s career declined because the reorganisation of the film industry limited the creative freedom he enjoyed in the 1920s. This article attempts to contribute to a wider acknowledgement of Dimitri Kirsanoff’s Estonian origins, his films and his important place in the world cinema.