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Unknowable Protagonists and Narrative Delirium in American Psycho and Hotline Miami: A Case Study in Character Engagement Across the Media

, Marco. 2013. Patterns of Cognitive Dissonance in Readers’ Engagement with Characters. Enthymema no. 8: 21-37. Caracciolo, Marco. 2014a. Beyond Other Minds: Fictional Characters, Mental Simulation, and ‘Unnatural’ Experiences. Journal of Narrative Theory vol. 44 no. 1. Caracciolo, Marco. 2014b. Two Child Narrators: Defamiliarization, Empathy, and Reader-Response in Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident and Emma Donoghue’s Room. Semiotica. CD Projekt RED. 2007. The Witcher. Microsoft Windows. Atari. Churchland

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What Big Teeth She Has

Abstract

Myra Hindley is one of the most notorious female murderers in the world. This poem explores the ways in which Hindley has been, and continues to be mythologised by society. It examines the mythical women that have been compared to her, and attempts to demonstrate how dangerous it is to compare real people to fictional characters. The poem discusses how the press depicts murderers and the affect this has on the world. Using examples such as Dracula, the poem also reflects on how facts lose truth over time, and how many stories about real people have become mythologised whether this was intentional or not.

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Character as a Vanishing Point in American Experimental Fiction

Abstract

My paper discusses the construction of character in some American experimental narratives within the optical paradigm of the vanishing point. In a first part the investment of the pictorial notion of the vanishing point in Faulkner’s Light in August will be discussed as an instance of the occasional confrontation in Modernist fiction of the limits of literary representation, even if the pictorial category is adapted (and so limited) to the specific issue of biracial identity. In a second part, William Gass’s short story “Mrs. Mean” and Paul Auster’s The Locked Room will be examined as instances of a sustained critical recasting of the very concept of character. The trope of the vanishing point is consciously deployed in both texts to reinvent fictional character within the challenging scope of borderlines between presence and absence, the life-like (mimetic) and the purely verbal.

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The adventure of the deceitful numbers

Abstract

This article addresses access to high-quality education under a neoliberal mentality. It engages at both the discursive and material levels, by mapping how taken-for-granted truths about neoliberal policies circulate through the media. The media—newspapers, network channels, and news websites—have correlated quality education with socioeconomic status, which have effects of power in the fabrication of the productive citizen and low-performer, and in the perpetuation of the “class/room”.

The unexpected deceitfulness of numbers operates as a rhizomatic regime of truths, conducting our ways of being and acting in the world. This analysis takes numbers as an actor to challenge the apparent representative and descriptive nature of standardized assessment outcomes, and the idea that competition, freedom of choice, and accountability are a means of securing equity, inclusion, and economic growth. The novels of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, particularly those featuring the fictional character Sherlock Holmes, and the Sherlock Holmes adaptations portrayed by Benedict Cumberbatch in the TV series “Sherlock” have inspired the narrative of this story. Sherlock’s mind palace—a feature added to Holmes’ personality in the TV series—is put to great use in the narrative of this article.

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Creative Pluralism in Indian and Romanian Accounts of Transnational Migration

Abstract

The paper offers a comparative perspective on transmigrant cultural identities as illustrated in the works of two contemporary South Asian American and Romanian American authors, Jhumpa Lahiri and Aura Imbăruș. The comparison involves Gogol, a South Asian American character, and Aura, the author of the memoir Out of the Transylvania Night. Although Gogol is a fictional character and Aura is an actual transmigrant, their comparative assessment relies on the assumption that both narratives are inspired by the authors’ background of relocation. Despite their different cultural origins, both authors share thematic aspects related to the dynamics of cultural identity in the context of migration. This paper aims to provide a starting point for an enlarged framework of comparative analysis, in order to foreground intersections between different experiences of cultural negotiation in the context of displacement. Born and raised in America, Gogol is challenged by his cultural multiplicity and strives to suppress elements of his Indian identity. After years of rebelling against his parents’ norms, Gogol shifts to the Bengali model, when his father dies. Once he accepts the relevance of his cultural roots, Gogol is able to plunge into a dimension situated beyond his Bengali and American selves. His transcendent strategy is illustrated by his decision to plunge into a third space of redefinition, suggested by the Russian literature which is appreciated by Gogol’s father. Aura Imbăruș offers the example of a first generation Romanian transmigrant who undergoes voluntary relocation to the United States. Fascinated by the American world, Aura is eager to take over norms of material success and consumerism, overlooking the relevance of her cultural roots. When she undergoes a personal family crisis, Aura eventually reassesses the value of her Romanian background, aiming to reconcile her source culture with her Americanised self. In a manner similar to Gogol’s, Aura manages to integrate American norms of success, while forging enduring bonds with the Romanian American community in California.

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The Social Furniture of Virtual Worlds

://alphavilleherald.com/2006/12/ibm_shocker_lls.html > Putnam, H. 1988. Representation and Reality . Cambridge: MIT Press. Searle, J. 1980. Minds, brains, and programs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3: 417–57. Searle, J. 1990. Is the brain a digital computer? Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 64: 21–37. Thomasson, A. 2003. Fictional characters and literary practices. British Journal of Aesthetics 43: 138–57. Wittgenstein, L. 1991. Philosophical Investigations . New York: Wiley.

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Centaurs, Pegasus, Sherlock Holmes: Against the Prejudice in Favour of the Real

Encyclopedia of Philosophy , Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = < http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2015/entries/nonexistent-objects/ >, Winter 2015 Edition. Routley, R., 1982, “On What There is Not” , Philosophy and Phenomenological Research , 43 (2), 151–177. Russell, B., 1905, “On Denoting”, in Mind , n. s. XIV, 479–493. Simons, P., 2013, “And Now for Something Completely Different: Meinong’s Approach to Modality”, Humana. Mente. Journal of Philosophical Studies , 25, 119–134. Thomasson, A., 2003, “Speaking of Fictional Characters”, Dialectica

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Ubiquitous Absence
Character Engagement in the Contemporary War Film

California Press. Plantinga, C. (2010) ’I Followed the Rules and They All Loved You More’: Moral Judgement and Attitudes toward Fictional Characters in Film’. Midwest Studies in Philosophy XXXIV, 34-51. Pötzsch, H. (2010) ‘Challenging the Border as Barrier: Liminality in Terrence Malick’s ‘The Thin Red Line’’, Journal of Borderlands Studies Vol. (25(1), 67-80. Pötzsch, H. (2011) ‘Borders, Barriers, and Grievable Lives: The Discursive Production of Self and Other in Film and Other Audio-Visual Media’, Nordicom Review Vol

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The application of new technologies in promoting a healthy lifestyle: selected examples

) with superimposed virtual objects using augmented reality. The most popular game is Pokémon Go, encouraging users to cross streets, city squares and parks in search of mysterious portals in order to catch fictional characters. And although this game evoked controversy related to the security, privacy and even ethical and moral implications of technology in reality ( Alomar, Alsaleh, Alarifi, 2018 ), it gained popularity in a very short time. There are many other interactive games acting on similar premises. One of them is Ingress, which is used, among others, in

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From Saint Sava to Milosevic – The Pantheon of (Anti)heroes in Serbian Presidential Election (2017)

Serbian national heroes. According to him, the main figures are Saint Sava, Tsar Dušan, Prince Lazar, Miloš Obilić, Marko Kraliević, Marko Kraliević – a historical figure of whom, however, little is actually known. A subject of many legends presenting his adventures as a great warrior. Old Novak, and the Mother of Jurgevićes Old Novak, Mother of Jurgevićes – fictional characters connected to the Kosovo myth. – the mythical and historical characters connected with the medieval state of Serbia (12th to 14th century), and the heroes who played a significant role in the

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