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Race, Femininity and Food: Femininity and the Racialization of Health and Dieting

References Andermahr, S et al. (2000), A Glossary of Feminist Theory. London: Arnold. Bordo, S (2003), Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture and the Body (Tenth Anniversary Edition) California: University of California Press. Bartkey, S (1988) ‘Foucault, Femininity, and the Modernization of Patriarchal Power’ in Diamond, I and Quinby, L (Eds) Feminism & Foucault: Reflections on Resistance Northeastern University Press. Charmaz, K (2003), ‘Grounded Theory’ in Smith, J.A. (Eds) Qualitative

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Fluids, cages, and boisterous femininity: The grotesque transgression of patriarchal norms in Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus

References BibleGateway.com. Harper Collins Christian Publishing. Web. 10 February, 2016. Brooks, C. (2006). Every inch a woman: Phallic possession, femininity and the text. Vancouver, Canada: UBC Press. Camus, A. (1955/2012). The myth of Sisyphus and other essays. (Trans. J. O’Brien). New York: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Carter, A. (1993). Nights at the circus. London: Penguin. Dennis, A. (2008). “The spectacle of her gluttony”: The performance of female appetite and the

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Reinventing rural femininities in the post-productivist Finnish countryside

Zealand, Rural Sociology, 65(4), 605-620. DOI: 10.1111/j.1549-0831.2000.tb00046.x. [19] Little, J. (2002a). Gender and rural geography. Identity, sexuality and power in the countryside, Harlow: Prentice Hall. [20] Little, J. (2002b). Rural geography: rural gender identity and the performance of masculinity and femininity in the countryside, Progress in Human Geography, 26(5), 665-670. DOI: 10.1191/0309132502ph394pr. [21] Little, J. & Austin, P. (1996). Women and the rural idyll, Journal of Rural Studies, 12(2), 101

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Masculinity vs Femininity in Polish and Ukrainian Organisational Cultures

Abstract

One of the five cultural dimensions suggested by G. Hofstede, the dimension of masculinity and femininity, is very controversial. Defining cultures as feminine and masculine results in two issues. In the first, the content one, masculine cultures are characterised by “hard”, instrumental values, whereas feminine cultures by “soft” values whose core is the quality of interpersonal relations. In feminine cultures gender differences disappear, however, with the increase in the masculinisation of culture, the differences in the range of gender values grow. The article is of cognitive character. It shows the results of the research concerning the values and basic objectives in the range of dimensions of masculinity and femininity carried out in Polish and Ukrainian organizations.

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Shaping Gender: Femininity and Masculinity Through Sartorial Fashion in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway

Abstract

Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway — published in 1925 — not only represents a major work regarding its literary techniques during the years of British Modernism, but also constitutes a critique of the social system of the post-war years, which was experiencing a change regarding the strict Victorian stereotypes of gender. Social status linked to sartorial fashion is a recurring element in the novel when considering these configurations. Woolf vindicates through different characters’ reflections a rearrangement of femininity and masculinity.

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Captive Bodies: Victorian Construction of Femininity in Wuthering Heights and the Crimson Petal and the White

Abstract

This paper argues that both Wuthering Heights (1847) and The Crimson Petal and the White (2002) investigate, expose and condemn the multifaceted inscription of a specific culture on the female body (via the construction of femininity)-the defleshing of female bodies, which in turn makes them docile (at least temporarily). With different degrees of explicitness, the two novels demonstrate how this specific--capitalist, imperialist, patriarchal--culture forces itself onto the bodies of girls/women: the legalized, scientifically justified process whereby female bodies, regardless of class, are defleshed, skinned alive and made to emit signs of subjugation to the patriarchal will--this being their assigned role, without exception, in various male-dominated economies.

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“Much, I am Sure, Depends on You”: James Fordyce’s Lessons on Female Happiness and Perfection

. Jones, Vivien (ed.). 1995. The young lady’s pocket library, or Parental monitor, with a new introduction by Vivien Jones. Bristol: Thoemmes Press. Jones, Vivien. 1997. Women in the eighteenth century: Constructions of femininity. London and New York: Routledge. Marriott, Thomas. 1759. Female conduct: Being an essay on the art of pleasing to be practised by the fair sex, before, and after marriage. A poem in two books. Humbly dedicated, to Her Royal Highness, The Princess of Wales. Inscribed to Plautilla. London

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Representations of Femininity in Seventeenth Century Conduct Manuals for Gentlemen

Abstract

This paper investigates conceptual representations of women in 17th century conduct manuals for gentlemen published in England before and after the Civil War. The aim is to see whether the socio-cultural transformations produced by the Revolution are reflected in the metaphorical expressions referring to the female sex in a highly conservative textual genre

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Gender Identity of Students and Teachers: Implications for a Sustainable Future

spiritual health. The Open Psychology Journal, 2, 58-70. Kark, R. (2017). Androgyny. In V. Zeigler-Hill & T.K. Shackelford (Eds.), Encyclopedia of personality and individual differences. Springer International Publishing AG. Kark, R., Waismel-Manor, R., & Shamir, B. (2012). Does valuing androgyny and femininity lead to a female advantage? The relationship between gender-role, transformational leadership and identification. TheLeadership Quarterly, 23(3), 620-640. Kasen, S., Chen, H., Sneed, J., Crawford, T., & Cohen, P

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Commodification and Identity in Chick Lit

Abstract

This paper looks at the parochial facets of femininity versus their globalized avatars as apparent in two chick lit novels, Helen Fielding’s “Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason” 1999 and one of the novels in Sophie Kinsella’s The Shopaholic series, “Shopaholic Abroad” 2001. The paradigm I am operating within is that of consumerism and commodification as the new forms of globalization. More specifically, the paper sets out to investigate the extent to which global and local facets of (feminine) identity overlap, thus engendering what I label ‘glocal’ femininities, and the role of the commodification thereof.

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