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Autumn Migration Dynamics, Body Mass, Fat Load and Stopover Behaviour of the Willow Warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) at Manyas KuşcennetI National Park (NW Turkey)

Autumn Migration Dynamics, Body Mass, Fat Load and Stopover Behaviour of the Willow Warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) at Manyas KuşcennetI National Park (NW Turkey)

Turkey is located on one of the major migratory routes between Palearctic and Afrotropical regions. Despite its importance for many species, few studies exist on bird migration over Turkey. In this study, autumn migration dynamics and stopover behaviour of the Willow Warbler, a passage migrant in Turkey, was documented and analysed at Manyas Kuşcenneti National Park (NW Turkey). Birds were mist-netted, ringed, measured, weighed and fat scored from mid-August in 2002 and end of August in 2003 to end of October in both years. Totally, 543 and 929 Willow Warblers were ringed in 2002 and 2003, respectively. For 2002 and 2003 respectively, fat score values (mean ± SE) were 4.63 ± 0.06 and 3.84 ± 0.05, while body mass reached 11.38 ± 0.07 and 10.37 ± 0.05 g for birds captured for the first time. Fat scores in 2003 showed a bimodal distribution with peaks of T2 and T5, indicating populations or groups with different migratory strategies. The number of retraps constituted 9.2-12.1% of birds captured. In both years, minimum stopover length ranged from 1 to 15 or 16 days with a median of 5 days (averages 5.26 and 5.54, respectively). The majority of the retraps put on significant fat in both years. Retraps continued to put on weight for up to two weeks after they had arrived. In this second study documenting the Willow Warbler migration in Turkey, it was revealed that such wetlands as Manyas Kuşcenneti National Park provide crucial stopover habitat for possibly several populations of the species enabling them to gain necessary fat loads before crossing two major ecological barriers, the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara.

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Variation in body mass and fat reserves of the Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus on autumn migration in the L'viv province (W Ukraine)

References Busse P. 1970. Measurements of weight and fatness in migrating populations of birds. Not. Orn. 11, 1: 1-15. Busse P. 1983. Biometrical standards in the Operation Baltic work. Ring 116: 125-138. Busse P. 2000. Bird station manual. SEEN, Gdańsk Univ., Gdańsk Gyurácz J., Bank L. 1996. Body mass and fat load of autumn migrating Sedge Warblers (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus) in relation to age in south Hungary. Acta Zool. Acad. Scientiarum

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Timing of Pre-Nuptial Migration of the Song Thrush Turdus Philomelos in Calabria (Southern Italy)

Abstract

Muscianese E., Martino G., Sgro P., Scebba S. and Sorrenti M. 2018. Timing of pre-nuptial migration of the Song Thrush Turdus philomelos in Calabria (southern Italy). Ring 40: 19-30.

The European Commission has established that pre-nuptial migration of the Song Thrush Turdus philomelos in Italy begins in the second decade (10-day period) of January. This three-year study was carried out at two localities in the Calabria region of southern Italy from 2012 to 2014, with 3-4 ringing sessions every decade from mid-January to the end of March. In total, 447 birds were captured. Based on catching dynamics and changes in fat load and body mass, we documented that the species’ northward migration took place in mainly March, with early movements in February. As no migratory activity was detected before the second decade of February, the dates of the hunting season in this area can be re-considered.

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The Ringing Site In Jericho (Palestine) – Development Of Bird Migration And Parasitological Research On The Great Rift Valley Flyway

ABSTRACT

A new research project near Jericho in the Jordan Valley (Palestine) was launched on 10 September 2013, work continued until October 23rd 2013. Standard ornithological work and bird ringing work was conducted using mist nets situated in an oasis type habitat of Wadi Qelt surrounded by palm plantations. The field methods followed the SEEN (SE European Bird Migration Network) standards that include apart from ringing of captured birds, also several measurements (wing length, tail length, wing formula) and scores (fat load and body mass), as well as the studies on the directional preferences of migrants using round, flat orientation cages. Ornithological research was enhanced by parasitological studies analysing migratory birds (hosts) - helminths relations during migration period of the former. This was a part of complex studies covering the Middle East and north African ringing sites. Altogether 481 individuals of birds representing 59 species were ringed and about 50 were retrapped. The most interesting was relatively high share of Masked and Red-backed shrikes as well as good number of birds of local species as Dead Sea Sparrows and introduced Indian Silverbills.

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Stop-over of migrant Blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) on autumn passage through the Polish Baltic coast

Stop-over of migrant Blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) on autumn passage through the Polish Baltic coast

In this analysis, data on Blackcaps caught on autumn migration at the Operation Baltic stations: Bukowo-Kopań (54°28'N, 16°25'E) in 1984-1999 and Mierzeja Wiślana (54°21'N, 18°19'E) in 1982-1999 (in period: 14 August - 1 November) were used.

Total percentage of stopping-over (retrapped) Blackcaps was 11.6% at Mierzeja Wiślana and 7.9% at Bukowo-Kopań station. On average birds stayed longer at Mierzeja Wiślana (median - 5 days) than at Bukowo-Kopań (median - 4 days). Most probably, the Blackcap stop-over length and frequency depended on the food abundance in the area. Initial weight and fat load of birds retrapped later in the season were on average lower than of those caught only once, what suggests that birds stop-over to replenish their energy deficits. Weight and fat changes were influenced by the stop-over length. Individuals that left early, i.e. 1-2 days after ringing, not only did not gain energy, but also lost the reserves they had on their arrival. As the season progressed, birds tended to stop-over for a shorter time. The density of individuals already present in the studied area did not affect the decision of migrating birds to stop-over.

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Metabolic Syndrome and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Abstract

Introduction. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is regarded as the hepatic expression of the metabolic syndrome, both conditions presenting similar clinical features.

Aim. The aim of this study was to evaluate, among diabetic subjects, the relationship between fatty liver load and the presence of metabolic syndrome criteria.

Methods. An observational study was conducted on 92 subjects with type 2 diabetes. We followed anthropometric measurments, lipid profile, blood pressure and the degree of hepatic steatosis using ultrasonography.

Results. The average age of the study group was 60,38 ± 10,37 years, with an approximately equal distribution by gender (48% male and 52% female). More than half of the subjects presented hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL cholesterol level. Most of the patients included in the study had varying degrees of liver fat load (only 9,89% of cases of apparently normal liver on ultrasound), and met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (81,31%). It was found that the frequency of the cases with fatty liver impairment was significantly higher in subjects with metabolic syndrome (32,43% compared to 5,88% for those without metabolic syndrome, p = 0,01) and the frequency of the cases with normal liver were significantly higher in subjects without metabolic syndrome (23,53% to 6,76%, p=0,02).

Conclusion. We can say that NAFLD is a risk factor for the presence of metabolic syndrome and it can be considered the hepatic expression of this syndrome.

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Plasticity of Digestive System of Waders (Charadrii) as Migrants (Peculiarities of Fat Accumulation and the Source of Essential Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids During Migratory Stops in the Azov-Black Sea Region)

homoiothermia on the example of the study of the energy of birds. Journal of General Biology , 73 (2), 88–113 [In Russian]. Ilin, Yu. P., Fomin, V. V., Dyakov, N. N., Gorbach, S. B. 2009. Hydrometeorological conditions of the Ukrainian sea. The Sea of Azov . Vol. 1. Sevastopol, 1–402 [In Russian]. Jehl, J. R. 1997. Fat loads and flightlessness in Wilson’s phalaropes. Condor , 99 (2), 538–543. Kazimirko, V. K., Maltsev, V. I. 2004. The function of unsaturated fatty acids in the body. Medicine news , 95 , 35–39 [In Russian]. Kharchenko, L. P

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Phenology of Passerine bird migration in the Danube Delta, Romania

of seasonal migrations. Branta 8: 133-159. (in Russian). Didrickson Ö.K., Didrickson J.,Busse P. 2007. Autumn migration dynamics, body mass, fat load and stopover behaviour of the Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus at Manyas Kusçenneti National Park (NW Turkey). Ring 29: 67-89. Fiedler W. 1998. Trends in ringing numbers of Redstarts (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) and Wrynecks (Jynx torquilla) in Southern Germany. Die Vogelwarte 39: 233-241. (in German). Ginn H. B., Melville D. S. (eds). 1983. Moult in birds British

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Migration of Passerines through some Protected Areas in the Eastern Part of Egypt

. Ornithol. 140: 419-430. Gyuracz J., Bank L. 1996. Body mass and fat load of autumn migrating Sedge Warblers (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus) in relation to age in South Hungary. Acta Zool. Acad. Sci. H. 42, 4: 271-279. Hagemeijer E.J.M., Blair M.J. (Eds). 1997. The EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds: Their Distribution and Abundance. T & A D Poyser, London. Kesapli Can Ö., Bilgin C. 2005. Stopover ecology of some passerines at Ankara (Central Turkey). Ring 27, 2: 127-136. Kiepenheuer J., Linsenmair K

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