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Eroticism in and of the City: The Question of Approach

Plays by Jonson, Marston and Middleton. London: Rupert Hart-Davies, 1968. Print. Gregory, Paul. “Eroticism and Love.” American Philosophical Quarterly 25.4 (1988): 339-44. JSTOR . Web. 10 Apr. 2011. Gupta, Tanika. The Country Wife: A New Version . London: Oberon, 2004.Print. Harvey, David. The Urban Experience . Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1989. Print. Harvie, Jen. Theatre and the City. Houndmills: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009. Print. Highmore, Ben. Cityscapes: Cultural Readings in

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The Erotics of Scenario. On the Construction of the Subject in Postmodern Theatre

Abstract

Set in the postmodern culture cadres that Lyotard talked about twenty years ago, we are witnessing an accelerated mistrust of a conspicuous value. In fact, all this mistrust has occurred amid a radical overthrow of the way we were accustomed to perceiving the values of modernity. Having its starting point in philosophy, falling into disuse that postmodernity propose grows like a wave that appeared after a stone was thrown into the water. Theatre has not escaped from postmodern articulation, and its subjects have inevitably passed through the postmodern reconfiguration filter. In this article, we will talk about the subject of eroticism, trying to outline our thesis on the idea that the comprehensive synthesis of the receiver in relation to the postmodern performance is based on the construction of the subject folded on the identification of some indicators. Considered as a cultural construct, eroticism is eliminated through its discourse and requires scenarios to be fully understood and recognized. The question inevitably arises: to what extent can we talk about these scenarios in the postmodern performance?

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Eroticism in the “Cold Climate” of Northern Ireland in Christina Reid’s The Belle of the Belfast City

References Bakhtin, Mikhail. Rabelais and His World . Trans. Helene Iswolsky. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1984. Print. Bataille, Georges. Eroticism . Trans. Mary Dalwood. London: Boyars, 2006. Print. Bristow, Joseph. Sexuality . London: Routledge, 1997. Print. Butler, Judith. “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and Feminist Theory.” Theatre Journal 40.4 (1988): 519-31. Print. Friel, Brian. Dancing at Lughnasa . London: Faber, 1990

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Eroticism—Politics—Identity: The Case of Richard III

Abstract

Richard III’s courtship of Lady Anne in William Shakespeare’s King Richard III is a blend of courtly speech and sexual extravaganza. His sexual energy and power of seduction were invented by Shakespeare to enhance the theatrical effect of this figure and, at the same time, to present Richard as a tragic character. Richard’s eroticism in Act 1 Scene 2 makes him a complicated individual. Playing a seducer is one of the guises he uses to achieve his political aims on the one hand, and, on the other, the pose of a sexually attractive lover enables him to put his masculinity to the test. Throughout the scene Richard is haunted by his deformity that, together with his villainy, makes him a stranger to the world and an enemy to his family and the court. In order to overcome his self-image of a disproportional cripple he manifests his sexuality towards Anne to boost his self-esteem and to confirm that the lady will accept him despite his obvious physical shortcomings. This article uses Georges Bataille’s theory of eroticism and erotic desire to characterize Richard as a tragic individual and to explain the reasons behind his unexpected sexual behaviour in the seduction scene.

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Madame Edwarda By Georges Bataille: Being in Common Immoderation / Madame Edwarda De Georges Bataille: L’Être En Commune Démesure

Abstract

This article aims to clarify the notion of community such as it is perceived by the singularly modern outlook of Georges Bataille, especially in it’s illustration in his story Madame Edwarda. The absence or loss of community seems to represent the very condition of its existence. The lovers in Madame Edwarda simultaneously illustrate the birth as well as the death of such an unusual kind of community. While offering one’s self to the other in a sacrificial attempt to surpass oneself, each of them conveys to the other a sense of shared immoderation, and goes exceptionally beyond the completeness of a homogeneous enclosure in and on oneself. However, at the very moment when it seems to succeed, community is lost, and the being returns to its initial loneliness, which seems to have never been surpassed.

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Sexuality and its Deviations in the Post-Modern World

Abstract

As the modern world oscillates between powerful contrasts and profound discords, while promoting an individualistic relativism and placing excessive value on the biological life, seen as the only means towards fulfillment for a human existence reduced almost exclusively to the material plane, as the modern secularist views dispute Christian spiritual values more and more, the Church is called to adopt a new type of ministry. The Creed of the post modern society is the “transvaluation of all values”, which questioning and criticizing everything that offers stability to a society by anchoring it to history and tradition. Therefore, pornography, homosexuality, abortion, licentiousness and divorce have become everyday realities promoted through media and elevated to the level of a mandatory normality. Sex is now not only a commodity, but also a means to controlling the person. To overcome this real social crisis of the modern secularized society, the Christians of the 21st century are called to rediscover their liturgical vocation and the true meaning and power of the Worship with all its eschatological, ecclesiological, ascetical and cosmic dimensions and content.

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Gender and Eroticism in Contemporary Art from South Africa

Abstract

The aim of this article is to present the interaction between the history of lesbian and gay culture and its identity on the one hand, and the connection between the visual art or visual culture on the other hand. This essay endeavors to interpret the different meanings attached to sexual identities by examining the diverse artistic activities of a variety of artists: both men and women (e.g. Steven Cohen, Clive van den Berg, Andrew Verster, Nicolas Hlobo, Jean Brundrit, Zanele Muholi). Employing an intersectional analytical approach, the article shows that the identity of art is constructed alongside a person’s multiple identities, such as race, gender, family ties, religion and class. The main research question is whether in today’s visual art originating from South Africa, which is characterized by a hegemony of heterosexual stereotypes, there is a significant place for gender oriented art?

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Eroticism and Justice: Harold Pinter’s Screenplay of Ian McEwan’s The Comfort of Strangers

Abstract

A careful analysis of Harold Pinter’s screenplays, notably those written in the 1980s and early 1990s, renders an illustration of how the artist’s cinematic projects supplemented, and often heightened, the focus of his dramatic output, his resolute exploration of the workings of power, love and destruction at various levels of social interaction and bold revision of received values. It seems, however, that few of the scripts did so in such a subtle yet effective manner as Pinter’s intriguing fusion of the erotic, violence and ethical concerns in the film The Comfort of Strangers (1990), directed by Paul Schrader and based on Ian McEwan’s 1981 novel of the same name.

The article centres upon Pinter’s creative adaptation of McEwan’s deeply allusive and disquieting text probing, amongst others, the intricacies and tensions of gender relations and sexual intimacy. It examines the screenplay-regarded by many critics as not merely an adaptation of the novel but another, very powerful work of art-addressing Pinter’s method as an adapter and highlighting the artist’s imaginative attempts at fostering a better appreciation of the connections between authoritarian impulses, love and justice. Similarly to a number of other Pinter filmscripts and plays of the 1980s and 1990s, the erotic and the lethal alarmingly intersect in this screenplay where the ostensibly innocent-an unmarried English couple on a holiday in Venice, who are manipulated, victimized and, ultimately, destroyed-are subtly depicted as partly complicit in their own fates.

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Beyond the Garden: On the Erotic in the Vision of the Middle English Pearl

. Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Complete Works of Geoffrey Chaucer . Ed. F.N. Robinson. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1985. Print. Conley, John. “ Pearl and a Lost Tradition.” The Middle English Pearl: Critical Essays . Ed. John Conley. Notre Dame, IN: U of Notre Dame P, 1970. 50-72. Print. Daileader, Celia R. Eroticism on the Renaissance Stage: Transcendence, Desire, and the Limits of the Visible . Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998. Print. Davis, Norman. “A Note on Pearl .” The Middle English Pearl: Critical Essays . Ed. John

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In a World Characterized by Transience and Doomed to Extinction Some Old Women Still Need Love —Mrs Rooney from Samuel Beckett’s All That Fall

References Bair, Deirdre. Samuel Beckett. A Biography . New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980. Print. Bataille, Georges. Eroticism. Death and Sensuality . Trans. Mary Dalwood. San Francisco: City Lights, 1986. Print. Beckett, Samuel. “All That Fall.” Collected Shorter Plays . London: Faber, 1984. 9-39. Print. ---. Endgame . New York: Grove, 1978. Print. ---. “Footfalls.” Collected Shorter Plays . London: Faber, 1984. 237-43. Print. ---. Happy Days . New York

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