Search Results

1 - 10 of 27 items :

  • "diglossia" x
Clear All
Bilingualism and Diglossia as Sociocultural Phenomena in Romanian–Hungarian Translations in Transylvania

): http://doktori.btk.elte.hu/lingv/bodolukacscsilla/tezis.pdf. Diebold, R. 1961. Incipient bilingualism. In: Language 37: 97-112. Douglas, D. 2000. Assessing languages for specific purposes. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Fasold, R. 1984. The sociolinguistics of society. Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford. Ferguson, Ch. 1959. Diglossia. In: Bratt Paulston, Ch. & Tucker, G. R. (eds), Sociolinguistics. The essential readings. Malden (MA). Blackwell Publishing, Oxford. Haugen, E. 1977. Norm and

Open access
Diglossia or Functional Bilingualism in the Language Situation of Gypsies in Slovakia and Hungary

Northern Hungary. In: Die Sprache der Roma. Perspektiven der Romani-Forschung in Österreich im interdisziplinären und internationalen Kontext. Ed. D. Halwachs - F. Menz. Klagenfurt: Drava Verlag 1999, s. 277-390. FASOLD, Ralph: Diglossia. In: The Sociolinguistics of Society. Oxford: Blackwell, 1984, s. 34-60. FERGUSON, Charles A.: Diglosia. In: Antológia bilingvizmu. Zost. J. Štefánik. Bratislava: Academic Electronic Press 2003, s. 101-114. (podľa FERGUSON, Charles A.: Diglosia. In Word, 1959, roč. 15, s. 325

Open access
Prítomnosť češtiny na Slovensku a aspekt spisovnosti

identity. In: Slovenská reč, 2008, roč. 73, č. 3, s. 129 – 138. ĎUROVIČ, Ľubomír: Bardejovský katechizmus (1581) – prvá slovenská kniha. In: Slovenská reč, 2009, roč. 74, č. 4, s. 204 – 218. ĎUROVIČ, Ľubomír: Masniciovo Praefatio. In: Slovenská reč, 2013, roč. 78, č. 1 – 2, s. 32 – 36. ĎUROVIČ, Ľubomír: Pôvod a podoby češtiny ako spisovného jazyka Slovákov (Niektoré závery z filologickej analýzy Bardejovského katechizmu). In: Slovenská reč, 2015, roč. 80, č. 3 – 4, s. 133 – 156. FERGUSON, Charles Albert: Diglossia. In: Word, 1959, roč. 15, s. 325

Open access
On Linguistic Abilities, Multilingualism, and Linguistic Justice

’AQUILA, Vittorio–IANNÀCCARO, Gabriele. 2004. La pianificazione linguistica. Lingue, società, istituzioni . Roma: Carocci. FERGUSON, Charles A. 1959. Diglossia. Word 15: 325–340. FIEDLER, Sabine. 2010. Approaches to Fair Linguistic Communication. European Journal of Language Policy 2(1): 1–22. GAZZOLA, Michele. 2006. Managing Multilingualism in the European Union: Language Policy Evaluation for the European Parliament. Language Policy 5(4): 393–417. GAZZOLA, Michele. 2014. Lingva justeco: Kiel taksi ĝin? La ekzemplo de Eŭropa Unio . In: VERGARA

Open access
Arabic Diglossia at Works of Academy of the Arabic Language - the first Decade of 21st Century

Arabská dvojvariantná komunikácia v prácach akadémie Arabského jazyka - prvá dekáda 21. storočia

Open access
Students’ Attitude Towards Arabic Language Varieties: The Case of the Fuṣḥā Arabic

References Abdel-Jawad, H. (1981). Lexical and phonological variation in spoken Arabic in Amman. [PhD thesis]. Philadelphia: University Pennsylvania. Al-Mamari, H. (2011). Arabic diglossia and Arabic as a foreign language: The perception of students in world learning Oman center. Capstone Collection, Paper No. 2437. Brattleboro, VT: School for International Training Graduate Institute. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.sit.edu/capstones/2437/ [08.07.2017]. Assaf, A. (2001). Palestinian students’ attitudes

Open access
English-Only Language Policy: The Road to Provincialism?

Abstract

In this note, we outline various possible long-run effects of an English-only acquisition policy in the European Union. The point of departure is how individual behaviour adapts to constraints in the environment. This leads to changes in collective behaviour, which becomes part of the environment, again influencing individual behaviour. Possible equilibria of this feedback mechanism are discussed. It is argued that domain loss and diglossia may result. The process is further characterized by external effects. Looking at language knowledge as a merit good, path dependencies and multiple stable equilibria can be explained.

Open access
The Arabic Language: A Latin of Modernity?

. Until today, the Greek Orthodox Church prefers to use Katharevousa for written purposes. However, when it comes to liturgy, the New Testament Greek is the sole acceptable standard language variety. This became obvious when a Demotic translation of the New Testament Greek original of the Gospel of St Matthew was published in an Athens newspaper in 1901. This publishing event led to widespread violent riots, because this translation was seen as both “anti-religious” and “anti-national.” Cesaropapism and Diglossia Where does the case of the Arabic language fit the

Open access
Pseudo-realia in the Romanian Translations of Various Hungarian Institutions and in the Hungarian Translations of Romanian Public Administration Terms

Abstract

My presentation addresses an issue translators of Romanian–Hungarian legal and economic texts encounter almost day by day. Each field of translation is special in its kind, but translating legal/economic texts requires an especially accurate knowledge of the acts, laws, and concepts of both the source and target language since this is essential for the translated text to be really a quality, professional, and – last but not least – an intelligible one to the target-language audience, i.e. the customers.

Open access
Three Translators in Search of an Author: Linguistic Strategies and Language Models in the (Re)translation of Shakespeare’s Plays into Catalan

Abstract

This article shows how the language of Shakespeare’s plays has been rendered into Catalan in three especially significant periods: the late 19th century, the early 20th century, and the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The first section centres on the contrast between natural and unnatural language in Hamlet, and considers how this differentiation is carried out (by linguistic techniques that differ substantially from Shakespeare’s) in a late 19th-century Catalan adaptation by Gaietà Soler. The second part of the article investigates the reasons why in an early 20th-century translation of King Lear the translator, Anfòs Par, resorts to medieval instead of present-time language. The last section of the article illustrates how and explores the motivations why Salvador Oliva’s first (1985) version of The Tempest is retranslated in 2006 using a different language model. The ultimate aim of the paper is to put forward the hypothesis that, in the case of Catalan, Shakespearean translations are both a reflection of the current state of the language and a major linguistic experimentation that shapes and creates (sometimes through a via negativa) the Catalan literary language.

Open access