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Abstract

Quantitative variation in plastid pigments and polyphenols during leaf growth and after curing have been studied with several chlorophyll-deficient genotypes of tobacco. Under culture for flue-cured tobacco, the chlorophyll-deficient pale-yellow (NC95-Py) and yellow-green (SC58-yg) lines did not differ in polyphenol accumulation from the corresponding normal green recurrent parents NC95 and SC58. A negative correlation was evident between concentrations of polyphenol and chlorophyll. Decrease of the latter during leaf growth was accompanied with a decline of PPO and PRO activities. When the chlorophyll-deficient genotypes were grown under conditions for Burley tobacco, concentrations of chlorophyll and polyphenol maintained a steady level and were positively correlated, while the oxidases tended to increase. Burley 21 contained the lowest amount of polyphenols among the chlorophyll mutants, although the low chlorophyll content of its mature leaves was comparable to that of SC58-yg. Use of cultural practices for flue-cured tobacco caused an accumulation of polyphenols in green leaves. There was a greater loss of soluble polyphenols during air-curing than during flue-curing. Results indicate that the interaction of cultural practices with chlorophyll-deficient genes affects the metabolism of chlorophylls and polyphenols during leaf growth and maturation. Introduction of these genes into tobacco cultivars may provide a means of enhancing uniformity of leaf maturity and modifying certain leaf chemical constituents.

Abstract

My short article is a critical comment on Hartmut Böhme’s position paper „Perspectives of cultural studies in historical and contemporary analytical perspective“. I share Böhme’s conviction that research projects in the broad and blurred interdisciplinary field of culture studies must be grounded in a flexible theoretical plot. However, Böhme’s paper does not meet this challenge. I try therefore to suggest two trajectories of significant importance in a paradigmatic way: On the one hand, the always controversial definitions of culture are scrutinized, thereby relying on a context-sensitive concept of „difference“ that allows grasping culture as a permanent and interference-prone process of translations. On the other hand, I focus on the impact, agency or effectualness of things against the background of a symmetrical anthropology and the actor-network-theory. In both cases, the analysis is orbiting around the notion of „cultural practices“ by demonstrating how tightly the media turn and the ontological turn are theoretically intertwined.

Abstract

In order for the study of culture to be recognized as an autonomous subject, a profile of the discipline is necessary which clearly defines its purpose and its distinct, preferred goals, fields and topics. The suggestion is to establish the objectives based on three key issues: ‘What does it mean to act culturally?’, ‘What is cultural order?’ and ‘What determines cultural change?’ In the second half, I will present Hartmut Böhmes’ suggestion taking up preferred fields of cultural analytical work and supplement it with cultural sociology fields. The third part concerns a contemporary analytical profile of the study of culture, seen in society and cultural critique, especially in analysis of symbolic power.

Abstract

Nepali education culture is dominated by face-to-face tutoring. It has a long history starting from the Gurukul culture to the present formal schooling. Emerging practices of using technology in education have been promoting online learning as a form of distance education and gaining popularity. This paper focuses on digging out the contextual reality of open and distance learning (ODL) practices in Nepal beginning with an analysis and the author’s personal impression of the context. Core focus is placed to explore and discuss different thematic issues such as modes of learning associated education culture/tradition, flexible learning for Nepali students, ODL as a pedagogical tool for teacher education and implementation of ODL in Nepal. The author’s personal reflection, literature review, and insights from learning theories are meaningful to enrich the discourse. The paper concludes showing the promising future of ODL in Nepal as an option to traditional mode of education. In addition, attention is drawn on the need of Open University and role of existing universities for the successful implementation of ODL in Nepal to adapt acculturation of online learning by respecting the need of the new generation of learners at the age of Internet culture.

Abstract

Heritage has been defined differently in European contexts. Despite differences, a common challenge for historic urban landscape management is the integration of tangible and intangible heritage. Integration demands an active view of perception and human-landscape interaction where intangible values are linked to specific places and meanings are attached to particular cultural practices and socio-spatial organisation. Tangible and intangible values can be examined as part of a system of affordances (potentialities) a place, artefact or cultural practice has to offer. This paper discusses how an ‘affordance analysis’ may serve as a useful tool for the management of historic urban landscapes.

, since most of the exploratory studies of CAINS so far come from Western cultures. Findings from other cultures might be related to different appraisal of emotional situations, which are influenced by different socio-cultural practices ( Rekhi, et al., 2019 ). As an example, Kosovo might be considered as a collectivist society, which tends to assess emotions in terms of social worth, taking external factors into account rather than just one’s inner world. In Kosovo and in other similarly collectivistic societies, emotions are evaluated more often in terms of self

Abstract

In the analogue era, fan studies explored localized resistance within fan communities’ cultural practices, examining how this might lead to new understandings of gender, sexuality, and race. However, there has been less work that examines the consequences fans’ cultural practices using digital media have for the cultural politics of ‘poaching’. The current article presents a study of online fans’ perceptions of positively depicted Muslim characters from the Middle East in the television serial, 24. Like the rest of the show’s regular cast, these characters should be in focus for fans in their competing interpretations and evaluations of each episode in online discussion forums. The study comprises a comparison of how two online fan communities, one in the US and one in Norway, perceive counter-stereotypical Muslim characters. An analysis of fans’ readings is carried out, and one central finding is that fans appropriated 24’s counter-stereotype in ways that can be described as reactionary.`

Abstract

Background: Conversion disorder is mostly reported in girls. One factor that makes girls vulnerable for emotional problems is the cultural practice of son preference, which is prevalent in many Asian countries including Thailand. However, other cultural factors make boys vulnerable to develop conversion disorders.

Objective: We reported clinical symptoms, family assessment, and important points in family therapy in two boys with conversion disorder.

Method: Two boys age 10 and 14 years old presented with seizures. Neurological tests were unremarkable and an organically-based seizure disorder was ruled out. The patients were diagnosed as having conversion disorder and were sent for psychiatric evaluation and treatment.

Result: Family assessment revealed some cultural practices that led to frustration and conversion. These factors included the culture of silence and the tendency to somatize; the cultural practice of mourning; and the parentification of children especially the first-born. In family therapy, therapeutic work included breaking the silence in the family and helping the family develop the ability to talk about feelings; helping the family deal with frustration more effectively, and dealing with somatic symptoms in an empathic manner. When the patients were able to reconnect with their families and to voice their needs, the body no longer needed to speak for them and the symptoms remitted.

Conclusion: The case vignettes illustrated the role culture plays in modifying the manifestations of both intrapsychic and interpersonal conflicts in boys. Understanding such a role will help therapists to treat conversion disorders in boys more effectively.

Abstract

The main intention of this text is to show the interpretative track in the attempt to find the genealogy of expert appraisal. The main thesis expresses Zygmunt Bauman’s view of mutual connection between the weak and light status of identity in consumer culture and the tendency to create cultural practices in order to overcome that weakness, and to strengthen and confirm that status of identity. On the one hand, the main feature of consumer culture and our freedom expressed by consumption determines our identities and is the main reason for „corrosion of identity” (R. Sennett), but on the other hand it demands and generates the necessity of cultural institutions that guarantee its confirmation. Hence, we may find the reason for the so-called „counselling boom” and expansion of expert appraisal in our risk society. The presented text also shows the cultural background for cultural practices in the risk society and consists of the attempt to grasp social instant pedagogies. This phenomenon is analysed here by the role of advertisements and psychological guides as the main cultural practices of instant pedagogy. My intention seeks to bring to account often hidden and obvious practices, and to highlight in a critical manner the tendencies in our social milieu and in the face of „the unbearable lightness of consumption”.

Summary

Embodied simulation, a basic functional mechanism of our brain, and its neural underpinnings are discussed and connected to intersubjectivity and the reception of human cultural artefacts, like visual arts and film. Embodied simulation provides a unified account of both non-verbal and verbal aspects of interpersonal relations that likely play an important role in shaping not only the self and his/her relation to others, but also shared cultural practices. Embodied simulation sheds new light on aesthetic experience and is proposed as a key element for the dialogue between neuroscience and the humanities within the biocultural paradigm.