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EJSTA 38 (2020) DOI: 10.2478/ejsta-2020-0002 Article history: Received: 12.12.2019 Accepted: 08.05.2020 Available online: 11.06.2020 Abstract Fundamental to theology is the ordering of all things to God, yet this ordering is directly tied to the topic of relation. Thus, while the category of relation is inherited by Aquinas from ancient philosophy, it mostly shows up in Aquinas’ theological treatments. This paper will look specifically at the distinction between God and creatures as understood through Aquinas’ use of mixed relations. It will

Abstract

László Krasznahorkai wrote two different texts (the second being the script of Béla Tarr’s film) from two different perspectives starting from the well-known scene in Turin, Italy, where Friedrich Nietzsche embraced a horse beaten severely by the carter. Why does the interpretation of the Nietzsche-scene change? What kind of temporal, historical or ethical relationship does the differentiation between the two texts depend on? How can the beauty of the crumbs of life be perceivable? This article argues that in these works - in contrast with the commonly assumed precognitions about apocalyptic art - life and humble living creatures are celebrated.

Abstract

In this paper, I argue that contemporary political and intellectual conflicts over the right course for European integration are reflected in the historiography of Jean Monnet, the so-called founding father of the European Union (EU). Multiple and mutually antithetical representations of Monnet are explored across the central themes of the contemporary European debate: nationalism, sovereignty, political methodology, and economic ideology. I investigate how the different faces of Monnet are constructed and used to legitimate contradictory scholarly standpoints regarding these central themes. Along the way, I attempt to decipher the puzzle of Monnet’s elevation to the status of a theoretical pioneer in EU Studies. Finally, I also explore how different roles assigned to Monnet in the various narratives of the EU’s origins contribute to the construction of European identity.

Representations. Nem. preklad: Regeln und Repräsentationen. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp Verlag 1981. CHOMSKY, Noam: What Kind of Creature Are We? Nem. preklad: Was für Lebewesen sind wir? Berlin: Suhrkamp Verlag 2016. SEARLE, John R.: The Construction of Social Rules. Nem. preklad: Die Konstruktion der gesellschaftlichen Wirklichkeit. 3. Aufl. Berlin: Suhrkamp Verlag 2013. TOMASELLO, Michael: Die kulturelle Entwicklung des menschlichen Denkens. 5. Auflage. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 2015.

Abstract

The Canticle of the Creatures or Canticle of Brother Sun is based on a particular way of perceiving reality. Francis, who had turned away from ‘the world’, discovered a different way of looking at it. This is a divine way of perceiving, in which the senses do not grasp reality, but accept it as it communicates itself. This way of perceiving is only possible if one does not attempt to master the environment, but allows one’s senses to be weak. It is significant, therefore, that this song of praise was born at a moment of the utmost despair and weakness. The song’s content is in line with this weak perception: it is not about Francis who praises God and (or for) His creatures, but rather it is a testimony that the creatures-the elements-are already praising God, and a prayer that He should let Himself be praised by the creatures. Also in line with this weak perception is the fact that the creatures are praised just as they communicate themselves to Francis: as bodies. The theology of this song is that the creatures through their bodies resonate (strengthen, and colour) the blessings that come from God, thereby making His blessing present here on earth. Francis’ role is to give a voice and a language to the heavenly praises as they resound in his environment. The transformative power of this song is that we, whether consciously or not, do the same thing when we participate in this song.

of a place. We also talk here about the identity of a place, about assigning features of homeland to a place, and about the ways of creating relations/bonds with the recipient and influencing the actions/behaviour of the inhabitants. Dragons, creatures/monsters/animals born in the human imagination and never actually existent, which have played a significant role in the mythology of numerous cultures, were chosen as the symbol. Krakow, the former capital of Poland, a European city located in Malopolska, a historical district in southern Poland, was chosen as the

Abstract

Humans are flexible creatures that adapt their living environment for their own needs. A sedentary lifestyle forced humans to adapt the house building to changeable environmental conditions. Historical adaptable residential buildings were characterized by an increasing range of changes that occurred to the changing needs of occupants. Nowadays, evolving computer technology, intelligent systems and methods of the acquisition of renewable energy influence the growing expectations for residential buildings and their functions. The presented research describes selected contemporary adaptable houses, their features and range of adaptation. The aim is to formulate conclusions about the future of adaptable housing development and its potential. The reflection on this matter is the last part of the article.

Abstract

In the recent years, a dynamical development of an underwater robotics has been noticed. One of the newest group of underwater robots are biomimetic underwater vehicles. These vehicles are driven by undulating propulsion imitating fins of underwater creatures, e.g. a fish, a seal, etc.

This paper undertakes problem of thrust measurement of new biomimetic underwater vehicle equipped with undulating propulsion. At the beginning, the stand for thrust measurement is described. Then, two constructions of BUVs imitating a fish and a seal are presented. Further, the results of thrust measurement for two different undulating propulsions are inserted. At the end of the paper containing conclusions from performed measurements and foreseen research is included.

Abstract

In our academic environment, borders are usually treated within the territorial-institutional demarcation or the political resistance against such actions. In his essay “What is a Border?” Étienne Balibar focuses on political examples. What kind of demarcation is at work here? What kind of boundaries integrate everything in the space of social historical relations as if there was nothing else outside us? Politically speaking, we have created the institution of border, but according to the Australian philosopher Jeff Malpas, our being-in-the-world implies all-encompassing places as the material condition for the appearance of things and living creatures. The Hungarian term “határ” (border) has a specific meaning referring to the natural environment of a settlement: not a concrete line, but a field with depth around the built habitat of people. Can we apply a border theory based on political issues to our neighbourhood with non-human creatures? To what extent will the concept of border be changed if we consider different spaces of contact making? Through the close reading of some fragments from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden and Jack London’s White Fang, my paper shows how literature and the arts help us ask and investigate such questions.

Abstract

The pervasive psychological realism of Charlotte Brontë’s Villette (1853) challenges scholarly assumptions based on her biography or her indoctrination to Victorian medical discourses, as it explores dysfunctional body/mind interrelations, particularly those evidencing patriarchal pressures and prejudices against women. Under the guise of her heroine Lucy, the author becomes both the physician and the patient suffering from a female malady of unnamed origin. This article intends to prove that, instead of narratively unravelling her creature’s past trauma with healing purposes, the author conceals its nature to protect her intimacy and she focuses on the periphery of her crisis aftermath to demonstrate its severity by means of the psychosomatic disorders that persistently haunt her life: depression, anorexia nervosa and suicidal behavior. Brontë’s literary guerrilla of secrecy aims, simultaneously, to veil and unveil the core of Lucy’s clinical case with an unequivocal diagnosis: a harmful, mysterious event from her childhood/adolescence, whose reverberations repeatedly erupt during her adulthood and endanger her survival. Unreliable but “lucid”, this heroine becomes the daguerreotype of her creator to portray life as a sad, exhausting journey, where professional self-realisation - not love or marriage - turns into the ultimate recovery therapy from past ordeals, never successfully confirmed in the case of Lucy, who epitomises a paradigm of femininity in Victorian England: the impoverished, solitary, middle-class woman