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Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) of Innovative Pharmaceutical Corporations. The Case of BIOGEN

://www.biogen.com/en_us/...biogen/positions-and-policy.html , [accessed: 18.04.2017]. BIOGEN (2017a), Science That Matters , 2016 Global Impact Report. BIOGEN (2017b), 2017 Corporate Citizenship Report, https://www.biogen.com/en_us/corporate-citizenship-report.html , [accessed: 18.04.2017]. Bondy, K., Moon, J., Matten, D. (2012), An Institution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Multi-National Corporations (MNCs): Form and Implications, “Journal of Business Ethics” 111, DOI: 10.1007/s10551–012–1208–7. Bruyaka, O., Zeitzmann, H. K., Chalamon, I., Wokutch, R. E., Thakur, P. (2013), Strategic

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Leadership and Corporate Social Responsibility

References [1] Sachs J. D., The Age of Sustainable Development, Columbia University Press, 2015, p. 3. [2] Graafland, J.J., Eijffinger, S.C.W. and Smid, H., Benchmarking of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Methodological Problems and Robustness, Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 53, No. 1-2, pp. 137-152, 2004. MPRA Paper No. 20771, posted 18. February 2010 17:28 UTC, pp.1-16., online at http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/20771/. [3] Jonker J., de Witte M., Finally in Business: Organising Corporate Social

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Corporate Social Responsability: Selected Theoretical and Empirical Aspects

Limited, Howard House. Crane et al., after : K. Bondy, J. Moon, D. Matte (2012), An Institution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Multi-National Corporations (MNCs): Form and Implications, ʻJournal of Business Ethicsʼ, 111:281-299 DOI 10.1007/s10551-012-1208-7. Friedman M. (1970), The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits, ʻThe New York Times Magazineʼ, http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/dunnwerb/rprtns.friedman.html; (Article reprint). P. Gottschalk (2011), Corporate Social Responsibility

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Sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR): Essential topics for business education

common future. Oxford University Press. Retrieved January 2015, from http://www.un-documents.net/wced-ocf.htm. Corporate Social Responsibility-CSR Matrix - a handbook, developed within the Leonardo da Vinci - Transfer of Innovation project “Corporate social responsibility - CSR Matrix”, financed under the contract: 2011-1-PL1-LEO05-19898.

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What do we know about corporate social responsibility research? a content analysis

Introduction Though the roots of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement can be traced to the early 20th century ( Carroll and Shabana, 2010 ), the term corporate social responsibility was first mentioned in Bowen’s work Social Responsibilities of the Businessman (1953) . Bowen (1953) argued that firms need to understand the importance of business ethics and its contribution to long-term firm performance. CSR initiatives are very important in the context of business ethics ( Maignan and Ferrell, 2004 ), and a number of interesting findings

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Responsible Investment: Taxes and Paradoxes

1 Introduction Traditionally, corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been divided into economic, ecologic, and social elements. One of the best-known theoretical models exemplifying these elements, is Elkington’s (1997) triple-bottom-line framework, and many researchers have adopted this framework to evaluate CSR from the perspective of different stakeholders. For example, society expects companies take into account the economic, environmental, and social effects of their businesses and operations. The terms ‘company’ and ‘corporation’ are often used

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Good Tax Governance: A Matter of Moral Responsibility and Transparency

improve corporate reputation and regain public trust, corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a helpful tool. Currently, many companies embrace CSR, which entails several kinds of obligations towards the society (§6). The question is, however, whether a business’ CSR should also reflect (moral) leadership in relation to its tax strategy? Moreover, does the ethical obligation to go beyond what is required by the law - key to CSR companies - encompass, for instance, tax transparency? These questions structure this article. It will be argued that in light of CSR, good

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Conceptual framework of value creation through CSR in separate member of value creation chain

Abstract

The main goal of this paper is to prepare a conceptual framework which would help to determine where any kind of value might emerge while various actions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) are implemented. Such conceptual framework is suggested as a backbone for further research and empiric justification in order to develop a simplified yet effective CSR outcome evaluation model which might be used in practice in any company. Such practical model should help to determine which CSR action might bring maximized value outcome with lowest costs. The main attention in this paper is concentrated only on a single company as a member of value creation chain (VCC). The paper lays foundation for perspective to develop the research in a holistic way - to evaluate the effect of CSR integration in whole VCC. Many authors have debated the different possibilities of simultaneously incorporating social, environmental and economic concerns into management thinking and practice (Aguilera et al., 2007) in organizational behavior; Buysse and Verbeke (2003); Starkey and Crane (2003); Barin-Cruz et al. (2006) in strategic management. All those scholars have been developing concept of CSR from different point of view. This paper concerns value creation through CSR as economical category. But therefore in order to indicate areas of possible value creation, various all above mentioned aspects of CSR concept are taken into account.

This paper suggests a framework of value creation through CSR, considering CSR implementation might help to create shared value for few beneficiaries simultaneously. The framework consists of all four types of responsibilities described by Carroll (1999), different levels of CSR activity, three major groups of beneficiaries (company, society, stakeholders) and areas of possible value creation.

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Life Cycle Assessment in Management of Socially Responsible Enterprise

Abstract

The following paper presents dangerous and evident phenomenon of communicational chaos in the field of environment protection and sustainable development in a turbulent external environment. It is pointed that this phenomenon gives organizations an opportunity to take pretended pro-environmental actions, such as socially critical greenwashing. As a counterbalance to those practices, a concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is presented, underlining the possibility of developing honest environmental marketing basing on methods such as Life Cycle Assessment.

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Analysis of the Financial Situation of Selected Respect Index Companies

Abstract

The concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has become popular among organizations, the public, and external stakeholders. Recently, it has been appreciated by capital markets the indexes of which are constructed in such a way as to account for companies’ CSR. One of these indexes is the Respect Index of the Warsaw Stock Exchange. This paper analyses the financial condition of Respect Index companies in Poland using the desk research method. The analysis utilizes indicators of the so-called Du Pont’s pyramid (for all companies under consideration) and stock market indices such as a book value per share (BVPS) and a price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) (for the banking and insurance sectors and all other sectors, respectively). The analysis shows that the financial condition of the studied Respect Index companies in the years 2013 – 2015 was stable in the period of analysis, despite the not-so-optimistic financial situation of their industries. Socially responsible management can often result in good financial position and increase in the company’s rate, which may be indicated by the fact that the Respect Index increased by 40% in 2009-2015 compared to a lower increase WIG (18%) or WIG20 (-20%) decline. To find out more about the relationship between the stability of companies’ financial results and their CSR, more investigations and analyses of companies included in the Respect Index as well as other companies dedicated to CSR issues need to be conducted.

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