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. Memory Studies: The State of an Emergent Field . Memory Studies. ePub. June 20. Foucault, Michel. 1977. Language, Counter-Memory, Practice . Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press. Gablik, Suzi. 1991. Making Art as if the World Mattered. Models of Partnership. In The Reenchantment of Art . New York: Thames and Hudson. Gibbons, Joan. 2007. Contemporary Art and Memory: Images of Recollection and Remembrance . London; New York: I. B. Tauris. Halbwachs, Maurice. 1950. La mémoire collective . Paris: Albin Michel. Hałas, Elżbieta. 2010. Time and Memory: A Cultural

. 2011 [1999]. Le nouvel esprit du capitalisme. Mesnil-sur-l’Estrée : Gallimard. Buscatto, Marie. 2008. Tenter, rentrer, rester : les trois défis des femmes instrumentistes de jazz. Travail, genre et sociétés 1(19) : 87–108. Bydler, Charlotte. 2004. The Global ArtWorld Inc. On the Globalization of Contemporary Art . Uppsala : Uppsala University Library. Canton du Valais. 2010. Règlement sur la promotion de la culture du 10 novembre 2010. https://www.vs.ch/web/culture/dispositions-legales (06.02.2017). Canton du Valais. 2014. Dispositif ArtPro Valais. https

Abstract

The paper discusses the subject of the introduction of modern forms into spaces of a historical character, mainly into historical gardens. Its aim is to present the general tendencies, causes and scope of the introduction of modern art into these types of interiors, the problem of their interference with historical tissue, its scope and goal, along with an outline of general guidelines for these types of projects.

Abstract

Visual art curriculum should allow a wide range of activities to develop children's imagination and creativity, to provide a balanced framework for the harmonious development of people who can cope with the massive ammount of images that invade our daily lives. Contemporary art develops a new language - a hybrid language - which for now remains unknown to the majority of the public and it is not integrated into the Arts curriculum. General frame analysis reveals that Fine Arts are studied only up to the 10th grade, except for the humanity profile and for the vocational arts profile. School curricula stipulate fine arts study up to mid twentieth century. Openness towards contemporary art and the language of art starting with the second half of the twentieth century is quite limited even if the curriculum allows a certain flexibility in the approach.

Abstract

The article discusses the recent international interest in contemporary Romanian art and its growth in market share, with a focus on the United States. The theme is followed thorough in numerous museum exhibitions, increased collector following, art fair presence, gallery representation and auction activity initially in Europe and the United States. The phenomenon is discussed both in the context of the larger international movement conducive to the contemporary art price bubble, and in that of the local socio-economic changes. My chief interest lies in the factors leading up to the entry of post 1989 Romanian art in the global arena as a manifestation of market forces in the field. The analysis follows its grass roots local emergence through non-profit institutions, individual artists, small publications, low budget galleries, as well as the lack of contribution (with few notable exceptions) of state institutions, while pointing out the national context of increasing deregulation of social support systems resulting in lack of focus on cultural manifestations. The conclusion is that the recent ascent of contemporary Romanian art (and coincidentally, the award winning contemporary Romanian cinematography) is a fortuitous convergence of various factors, among which, increased international mobility and sharing. At the same time, it is also the result of the evolution of various individual artists that pursued a form of art rooted in Romanian artistic tradition but with a focus on the symbolic figurative. The result is a personal semiotics of raising the mundane to extraordinary levels that reconfigured the anxiety of entering a new system into an unmistakable and lasting visual language.

Abstract

This paper presents an attempt to critically investigate the literary work of Japanese artist Kusama Yayoi (b. 1929). It takes as its object two of Kusama’s early prose texts and, by reading them through a feminist account of identity as fetishism, shows that the two novels presented in this paper-Kurisutofā danshō kutsu (1984) and Rijin kāten no shūjin (1984)-can be understood as a critical engagement with a potentially non-normative feminine self and, in a broader sense, as a negotiation of the state of being a woman in a patriarchal/androcentric society. These features can be traced back to her 1960s sculptural work and her Infinity Net Paintings. By not only situating Kusama’s literary work in a socio-historical context but also demonstrating that it constitutes an intertextual continuum with the rest of her artistic oeuvre, this paper offers an understanding of Kusama’s work besides the dominant narrative of her mental illness and lays the ground for further investigations into her literary texts.

Abstract

This paper seeks to analyse the iconographic and iconological significance of the 2009 exhibition Art Project concerning Important Historical Issues of the Country (Guójiā zhòngdà lìshǐ tícái měishù chuàngzuò gōngchéng). The exhibition was set up on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China and was part of a series of cultural, artistic and literary activities at that time. Created and promoted by the Ministry of Finance, Culture and Propaganda, the exhibition set out the artists’ mission as the presentation of the great history and ‘great national spirit’ (wěidà mínzú jīngshén) of the people of China and ‘the cultivation and spreading of the national spirit’ (péiyǎng hé hóngyáng mínzú jīngshén). This was realised through the media of oil painting, sculpture and traditional Chinese painting, with oil paintings, as the traditional tool of representation, taking up the biggest part of the exhibition. Based on Erwin Panofsky’s arthistorical method of the three-stage model, the text explores and displays the iconographical and iconological meaning of one representative painting: The March of the Volunteers.

. Jablonskienė, Lolita. Interview by author. Vilnius, October 2, 2015. Jasaitė, Vitalija and Nida Rutkiene. Interview by author. Vilnius, April 3, 2015. Juospaitytė Bitinienė, Jurgita. Interview by author. Vilnius, April 8, 2015 and May 18, 2015. Jurėnaitė, Raminta. „Dailę remianti fundacija – Soroso šiuolaikinio meno centras“ [Art-sponsoring Foundation – Contemporary Art Centre by Soros]. Lietuvos dailės kaita 1990–1996: Institucinis aspektas. Straipsnių rinkinys [Changes in Lithuanian Art 1990–1996: Institutional Aspect. Collection of Articles.] Vilnius: International Art

Abstract

During the last couple of years, 3D printing has been widely discussed as a technology with the potential to revolutionize production methods as we used to know them. However, hitherto not much has been written about the aesthetic| aspects of this new possibility of transferring bits to atoms. What kinds of (3D) images are awaiting us? This article focuses on how three contemporary artists are including 3D prints and the process of 3D printing in their work. The article offers a short introduction to the characteristics of 3D printing followed by indebt analysis of art works by Spanish installation artist Alicia Framis. Danish sculptor and professor at The Royal Danish Art Academy Martin Erik Andersen and German filmmaker and writer Hito Steyerl. The article points out how these, very different, works of art use 3D printing to offer the viewer a sense of inter-dimensionality. The central experience here lies somewhere between 2D and 3D.

Abstract

The aim of this article is to present the interaction between the history of lesbian and gay culture and its identity on the one hand, and the connection between the visual art or visual culture on the other hand. This essay endeavors to interpret the different meanings attached to sexual identities by examining the diverse artistic activities of a variety of artists: both men and women (e.g. Steven Cohen, Clive van den Berg, Andrew Verster, Nicolas Hlobo, Jean Brundrit, Zanele Muholi). Employing an intersectional analytical approach, the article shows that the identity of art is constructed alongside a person’s multiple identities, such as race, gender, family ties, religion and class. The main research question is whether in today’s visual art originating from South Africa, which is characterized by a hegemony of heterosexual stereotypes, there is a significant place for gender oriented art?