Search Results

1 - 10 of 162 items :

  • "comparative research" x
Clear All

Abstract

In this ongoing research we are going to have a look at the starting point for the burgeoning national feelings with two smaller nations: the Slovak and the Flemish national movement. Building on the methodological framework of nationalism researcher Miroslav Hroch, one can discern a threefold stage - model in the national movements of the smaller nations in Europe, which is a thesis still needing more empirical evidence. This article attempts to compare at least one aspect of early nineteenth-century nation - building: How were the literary societies functioning in both national movements? We are working in a time scope of the first half of the 19th century and ask ourselves the questions: until which extend reached literary societies? What was their impact? Which people were their readers, their public? Was their language, and their language-spreading aim representative for the whole nation? What similarities and differences can be found in Flanders and Slovakia in this field?

Important support can be obtained from the NISE - network, which attempts to create a database on a European scale in order to stimulate and optimize comparative and transnational research on nation building.

Abstract

This paper focuses on the largely unexamined phenomenon of the developing trans-national suburban area west of Szczecin. Sadly the local communities in this functionally connected area struggle with national planning policies that are unsuitable for the region. The paper examines the impact of those processes on the border region in general and on the localities in particular. The paper investigates the consequences for local narratives and the cohesive development of the Euroregion and what position Polish and German communities took to develop the region, even without the necessary planning support. The region has succeeded in establishing grass-roots planning mechanisms which have helped to create a metropolitan-region working from the bottom up.

Abstract

Despite the tendency of some academic disciplines to assume that the nuclear family is normative, the family takes a number of different forms cross-culturally. Regardless of family form, family members typically cooperate in raising children. Intergenerational help (from grandparents to parents and children), for example, is a cross-cultural universal. Such cooperation means that the availability of kin may be one salient factor in deciding whether and when to have children. Here I consider the evidence for whether the availability of kin does influence fertility, and whether these relationships vary cross-culturally. I find evidence from middle and lower income populations that the presence of kin does increase fertility, and that these relationships are plausibly driven by cooperation between family members. In higher income contexts, associations between kin and fertility are mixed, and appear particularly sensitive to how kin availability and support is measured. There is some evidence that certain measures of support from kin (such as emotional support or help with childcare) increases the likelihood of subsequent births, but kin support is not always positively associated with fertility. Family matters for fertility, then, though these relationships may be complex and context-specific. Policy needs to take this diversity into account, and should not focus exclusively on the nuclear family model, nor neglect the roles other family members play in reproductive decisions.

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to analyse and compare the design and governance of the contemporary childcare policy in the Czech Republic and Norway in relation to the situation of households with dependent children under school age. Following this, we review certain provisions of the childcare policies of the two countries, whose systems possessed certain similarities at the beginning of the 1990s, although they represent distinct types of welfare state. Our analysis reveals that the chief differences in childcare policy have persisted and adapted to the key features of the welfare regimes. The two countries’ central childcare policy values contrast with each other (equity and free choice in Norway vs. re-familisation and strong ‘family dependency’ among individuals in the Czech Republic) and exhibit differences in the structure and extent of policy measures, as well. Policies in both are less sensitive to the needs of children with specific needs (such as migrants in Norway or Roma children in the Czech Republic).

Abstract

Different countries differently address the physical education needs of disabled children. Some focus only on the classroom learning hence equipping the children with little knowledge on physical education. Others lack the facilities to facilitate the physical education of the disabled. This has led to an increased number of the disabled with little or no knowledge about their talent in the field of sports. This paper compares access to the physical education by the disabled in England, Germany, France and Turkey. The countries were determined by taking into consideration the population and geographical conditions. Data is collected from secondary resources and compared for the countries. The paper also sheds light on the factors that hamper the provision of physical education to the disabled in the three countries. It is concluded that the education systems in Germany and England do not favor the provision of physical education to the disabled. Special educational needs are recognized in the French education system and hence the reason behind the increased number of disabled children majoring in sports. The second barrier to the provision of physical education to the disabled is the lack of facilities. In Germany, for example, there are inadequate facilities for use by disabled students while doing physical exercises. In England, the focus is on classroom learning. It is only in France where the government has provided adequate equipment for use by the disabled during physical education classes (Ardoy, et al., 2014). In Turkey there is a need to further encouragement of participation in physical activity of people with disabilities Finally, there has been a belief that the disabled have no place in the field of sports hence leading to poor financing of the special needs education by the government.

public administration characteristics and performance in the EU28 , EU: Luxembourg. [10] Heclo, H. (1974). Modern Social Politics in Britain and Sweden , New Haven, Connecticut; London: Yale University Press. [11] Heidenheimer, A.J., et. al. (1975). Comparative Public Policy: The Politics of Social Choice in Europe and America , New York: St. Martins Press. [12] Jupp, V. (2006). The Sage Dictionary of Social Research Methods . UK: Sage publications. [13] Kravchuk, R. S. (2008). Comparative Research in Public Administration: A Historical-Institutionalist Perspective

Abstract

The present article aims to point out, with the help of a comparative research, the efficiency of tuned mass dampers, modern variants of consolidation ensuring seismic structural safety, used for buildings with a reinforced concrete structure, designed and produced according to the new codes. Case studies were based on structural computations in the linear elastic field using the ETABS program.

The Level of Dogmatism in Schizophrenia. A Comparative Analysis of Utterance Texts with the Use of the Suitbert Ertel Dogmatism Quotient

The paper describes the results of comparative research on the level of dogmatism in the utterance texts of patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia (N=130) and healthy individuals (N=130). The analysis was conducted with the use of the Suitbert Ertel Dogmatism Quotient. The results indicate significant differences between these two groups.

Abstract

Since there is no clear definition of the terms "neural network" and "neuronal network", this paper is aimed primarily to establish the difference between them by a range of comparative research. Using a chart, the three parts that make up the structure of a neuron will be compared with the structure of an organization to determine who does in terms of role, in order to reproduce the neuron in the structuring level of an organization and give a meaning to the term of "organizational neuron."

Abstract

Food is deeply connected to processes of re-membering, identity construction, the texturing of shared spaces, and social relationships. This case-comparative research focusses on how everyday food-related practices (sourcing, preparing, serving and eating) reproduce aspects of culture and communal ways of being. We will consider the food practices of three dual-heritage households who took part in a series of biographical, ‘go-along’, ‘eat-along’ and photo-elicitation interviews. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which food is intimately interwoven with familial relationships, the reproduction of hybrid ways of being, and connecting the present, past, and future.