Search Results

1 - 10 of 126 items :

  • "citric acid" x
Clear All
Influence of Citric Acid on the Vitality of Stem Cells from Apical Papilla

vitro. Int J Dev BioI, 1992, 36, 491-503. 26. Mattuella G, Bento WL, de Figueiredo JA, et al. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Its Relationship With the Dental Pulp. J Endod, 2007, 33, 524-530. 27. Khedmat S, Shokouhinejad N. Comparison of the Efficacy of Three Chelating Agents in Smear Layer Removal. J Endod, 2008, 34, 599-602. 28. Machado-Silveiro LF, Gonzales-Lopez S, Gonzales-Rodriguez MP. Decalcification of root canal dentine by citric acid, EDTA and sodium citrate. International Endodontic Journal, 2004, 37, 365-369. 29. ScelzaMea

Open access
Ternary complexation of carvedilol, β-cyclodextrin and citric acid for mouth-dissolving tablet formulation

. 36 (2004) 1--6. T. Loftsson, D. Hreinsdottir and M. Masson, Evaluation of cyclodextrin solubilization of drugs, Int. J. Pharm. 302 (2005) 18--28; DOI: org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.05.042. T. Loftsson, P. Jarho, M. Masson and T. Jarvinen, Cyclodextrin in drug delivery, Expert Opin. Drug Del. 2 (2005) 335--351; DOI: 10.1517/17425247.2.1.335. J. A. Young, Citric acid chemical laboratory information profile, J. Chem. Ed. 80 (2003) 480. W. Chen, C. K. Oh, L. J. J

Open access
Removal of vanadium, potassium and iron from spent vanadium catalyst by leaching with citric acid at atmospheric pressure

Abstract

The effect of time, temperature, the catalyst particle size and the ratio of the catalyst weight to the leaching solution volume (S:L) on the treatment of spent vanadium catalyst components was determined using citric acid solutions at atmospheric pressure. The optimal parameters of catalyst leaching in 10% acid solutions at atmospheric pressure are: T = 323 K, t = 4 h, the particle size of less than 0.160 mm, the S:L ratio below 0.1. Under these conditions it was possible to dissolve about 90% of vanadium and potassium compounds and more than 60% of iron compounds contained in the catalyst. These results fall within the scope of research on a comprehensive method for recovering spent vanadium catalyst components.

Open access
Production of prebiotics via reactions involving lactose as well as malic acid and citric acid

Abstract

Prebiotics are such indigestible food ingredients that enter the colon and serve as nutrient for bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Since fibres and oligosaccharides are the typical prebiotics, we produced prebiotics in our experiments with the reaction of lactose and malic acid as well as citric acid, where these reactions made use of an appropriate concentration of these substances, had an adequate duration, and were carried out under optimal temperature conditions. We determined the optimal parameters of the reaction, measured the loss of the starting materials as well as the increase in concentration of the end-product, and analysed the total sugar content of the hydrolysed prebiotics after hydrolysis by hydrochloric acid. In vitro experiments were performed to demonstrate our end-product’s resistance to carbohydrate-degrading enzymes, which is a fundamental requirement for a prebiotic so that upon reaching the colon it can serve as nutrient for the probiotic bacteria found there.

Open access
Convenient Approach for the One-Pot, Three-Component Synthesis of 1-(Benzothiazolylamino)Methyl-2- Naphthol Using Citric Acid as a Green Catalyst

Abstract

A straightforward, one-pot multicomponent synthesis of 1-(benzothiazolylamino)methyl-2-naphthol derivatives was achieved by condensation of 2-naphthol, aldehydes, and 2- aminobenzothiazole catalyzed by a small amount of citric acid, which acts as a benign enviermentally catalyst. Mild conditions with excellent yields and a simple isolation procedure are noteworthy advantages of this method.

Open access
Effects on Productive Performance, Tibia Calcium and Phosphorous Retention, and Liver Enzymes Activity of Acidified and Alkalinized Diets in Broiler Chicken

Analytical Chemists, Arlington, DC. Aviagen (2007). Ross 308: Broiler Nutrition Specifications. Aviagen Inc., Huntsville, AL. Aydin A., Pekel A.Y., Issa G., Demirel G., Patterson P.H. (2010). Effects of dietary copper, citric acid, and microbial phytase on digesta pH and ileal and carcass microbiota of broiler chickens fed a low available phosphorus diet. J. Appl. Poultry Res., 19: 422–431. Biggs P., Parsons C.M. (2008). The effects of several organic acids on growth performance, nutrient digestibilities, and cecal microbial populations in young chicks

Open access
Phytochemical and growth responses of Mentha piperita to foliar application of biostimulants under greenhouse and field conditions

, Vandenberghe LPS, Rodrigues C, Pandey A. New perspectives for citric acid production and application, Food Technol Biotechnol 2006; 44(2):141-149. 18. Lehninger AL. CursoBreve de Bioquimica, Ediciones Omega, Barcelona 1979:214-223. 19. British Pharmacopoeia, HMSO, London 1988; 2: A137 – A:138. 20. Adams RP. Identification of essential oil components by gas chromatography/quadrupole mass spectroscopy, Allured Publishing. Carol Stream, IL, USA 2001; pp: 469. 21. Swigar AA, Silverstein RM. Monoterpenes, Aldrich Chemical, Milwaukee 1981. 22. Salwa MA. The

Open access
Morpho-physiological and biochemical responses of bladder cherry (Physalis alkekengi L.) induced by multienzymatic biostimulant, IBA, and citric acid

. Auxin activity: Past, present, and future. Am. J. Bot. 102(2), 180-196. E pstein E., L udwig- M üller J., 1993. Indole-3-butyric acid in plants: Occurrence, synthesis, metabolism and transport. Physiol. Plantarum 88(2), 382-389. J afari N., H adavi E., 2012. Growth and essential oil yield of basil ( Ocimum basilicum L.) as affected by foliar spray of citric acid and salicylic acid. Z. Arznei-Gewurzpfla. 17, 80-83. J anmohammadi M., S ufi -M ahmoudi Z., A hadnezhad A., Y ousefzadeh S., S abaghnia N., 2014. Influence of chemical and organic

Open access
Influence of Citric Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide on Postharvest Quality of Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L. ‘Pearl’) Cut Flowers

citric acid to retain greenness, nutritional and microbiological quality of minimally processed broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L.): an optimization study. Postharvest Biology and Technology 94: 1-13. DOI: 10.1016/j.postharvbio.2014.02.017. Rogers H.J. 2006. Programmed cell death in floral organs: how and why do flowers die? Annals of Botany 97: 309-315. DOI: 10.1093/aob/mcj051. Rubinstein B. 2000. Regulation of cell death in flower petals. Plant Molecular Biology 44: 303-318. DOI: 10.1023/A:1026540524990. Sairam R.K., Rao K.V., Srivastava G.C. 2002

Open access
Manufacturing of highly ordered porous anodic alumina with conical pore shape and tunable interpore distance in the range of 550 nm to 650 nm

Abstract

In this work, highly ordered porous anodic alumina (PAA) with tapered pore structure and interpore distance (Dc) in the range of 550 nm to 650 nm were fabricated. To produce hexagonal close-packed pore structure a two-step process, combining anodization in etidronic acid electrolyte in the first step and high-concentration, high-temperature anodization in citric acid electrolyte in the second step, was applied. The Al pre-patterned surface obtained in the first anodization was used to produce regular tapered pore arrays by subsequent and alternating anodization in 20 wt.% citric acid solution and pore wall etching in 10 wt.% phosphoric acid solution. The height of the tapered pores was ranging between 2.5 μm and 8.0 μm for the PAA with Dc = 550 nm and Dc = 650 nm, respectively. The geometry of the obtained graded structure can be used for a production of efficient antireflective coatings operating in IR spectral region.

Open access