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, Vol. 52, Issue 4, pp. 543-566. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2747/1539-7216.52.4.543 Karachurina, L. and Mkrtchyan, N., 2013: Izmeneniye chislennosti naseleniya administrativnykh raiyonov i gorodov Rossii (1989-2010): tsentro-periferiynyye sootnoshenija (Population dynamics in administrative units and cities of Russia (1989-2010): centre periphery perspective - in Russian). In: Alekseev, A.I. and Tkachenko, A.A. editors, Geografiya naseleniya i sotsialnaiya geografiya, Voprosy geografii. Moskovskij filial GO SSSR. Russkoe geograficheskoye obshchestvo, Sbornik, ss. 82

Abstract

Over the last 20 years, literary nonfiction has become increasingly popular among the Dutch reading public. Thanks to increasing sales, translations and literary awards the genre achieved a strong position in Dutch literature. This article analyzes the image of Central and Eastern European countries in Dutch literary nonfiction of the last ten years (2004-14). It searches for characteristics of an orientalist and balkanist discourse and the presence of the imagological centre-periphery model in the works of Geert Mak, Jelle Brandt Corstius, Olaf Koens, Joop Verstraten and Jan Brokken. Contemporary Dutch literary nonfiction contains a euro-orientalist discourse. Characteristics such as underdevelopment, hedonism, obscurity and authenticity are projected on Central and Eastern Europe, which is put in the periphery of Western Europe.

Abstract

The increasing dominance of neoliberalism as the key steering mechanism of the European Union (EU) since the early 1990s has implied the competitiveness-oriented reshaping of cohesion policy. The aim of this paper is to initiate a debate from a critical political economic perspective on the implications of this shift for Central Eastern European (CEE) member states. To this end, the paper discusses the formation of EU centre-periphery relations from a CEE point of view and formulates some preliminary suggestions as to how cohesion policy would need to be rethought in order to ensure the better integration of lagging CEE regions.

proceeds as follows. The next section discusses the centre–periphery theoretical perspective in the context of international migrations. The third section describes the trends in emigration from and immigration to Poland between 2001 and 2016 in the context of the centreperiphery concept. The fourth section touches upon the design of the survey of migrant workers, constituting the basis for additional empirical analyses. The fifth section discusses the results of the survey. The last section concludes the paper. Centre–periphery perspective in studies of international

Abstract

Geographical mobility has become a norm of contemporary art. This article examines the spatial dynamics of artists as they face the challenges presented by peripheral territory in visual arts, putting their mobility and flexibility to the test. Whether staying anchored in a geographical area or moving abroad depends on the dominant scheme within the world of art. The globalization of contemporary art promotes the formation and recognition of “hypermobile” artists, but it can also lead to local strategies of withdrawal.

Abstract

A great majority of African cultures are patriarchal, which is to say that the male members of such societies are responsible for the perpetuation of family/blood lines. Cultural practices such as succession rites, female genital mutilation, hereditary, widowhood rites, polygamy, kinship, etc., aggregate to marginalize African women, thus conferring absolute power on men. The perpetuation of the ruses of patriarchy is also enabled through writing. Since literature is ideologically determined, it is created by/through discourse; writing becomes an avenue through which male writers sustain the status quo. One author whose works have sustained patriarchal values among the Igbo is Chinua Achebe. In Things fall apart (1958), Achebe presents a coherent Igbo society whose internal dynamics revolve around an established hierarchical social structure which excludes the woman from the phallic games of power. Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo’s The Last of the Strong Ones (1996) subverts the patriarchal structures which undermine Igbo women. This paper discusses the cultural constructs which confer ultimate power on the men in Achebe’s Umuofia. Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo’s response to Achebe’s male chauvinism is realized through a counter discourse which seeks to reconstruct the battered image of the Igbo woman. Female Self-determination, re-appropriation of the female body, and breaking of silences are all discursive strategies adopted by Adimora-Ezeigbo in her attempt to rescue the woman from the Achebean margins. Textual analysis informs the methodology of this work, while relying on deconstruction and discourse analysis as theoretical frameworks.

Abstract

Focusing on the hotel imagery and, more precisely, the hotel Majestic featured in J.G. Farrell’s 1970 novel Troubles, this article provides a spatial contextualization of the historical downfall of the British Empire. In an attempt to establish the concept of the “colonial hotel”, this particular type of hotel is theorized as a fictional means of questioning the sustainability of the imperial project of colonialism. The theoretical framework for considerations of the Majestic in Troubles as a representative of the “colonial hotel” concept is based on Foucault’s heterotopology, as well as on the concepts of liminality and dislocation taken from postcolonial studies. Reading Troubles as an allegory of the Troubles in Ireland and, more broadly, a symptom of the disintegration of the British Empire, the article shows that the hotel, modelled after the historical concept of the Anglo-Irish big house, provides a proper setting where the deconstruction of the binary oppositions of colonial discourse can be played out. While the Majestic represents a mirror-image of the imperial centre, or rather a dislocated centre, its destruction is brought about by its tendency towards constancy and perpetuation of the illusion of grandeur. Similarly, the British Empire refuses to acknowledge the socio-political and historical changes of the early twentieth century and denies the existence of interstitial spaces between its firmly defined structures, whereby it inevitably meets its end.

. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of Airbnb is more regular, showing a centre-periphery pattern, while traditional hotels reveal more complex patterns. Coyle and Yeung (2016) examine Airbnb in 14 major European cities, and find that the share of multi-listings ranges between around 30% (Barcelona) and 9% (Paris). The impact of Airbnb on the hotel industry has been discussed by Zervas et al . (2014) , Neeser (2015) and Fang et al . (2015) . Egan and Nield (2000) have developed a model discussing the location choice of hotels, while Shoval (2006) has

Abstract

Changes in the organisation of social space, set in motion by the third industrial revolution, affected the spatial distribution of production and population, challenging established conceptions of centralities and urban networks at different scales. Temporal continuities and simultaneities are replacing spatial ones, as urban agglomerations expand in scattered ways. Material and immaterial economic flows are followed by economic and political spatial rearrangements. Eccentric centralities outside urban agglomerations emerge as a result of these spatial movements. The concept of centre-periphery used to be essential to distinguish differences, inequalities and asymmetries in social space, but contemporary urban and metropolitan sprawl defies previous centre-periphery correlations. Our goal is to discuss the changing notion of centralities within contemporary urbanisation. Hence following a theoretical approach on centralities, poles and positioning, the spatial context of the Belo Horizonte Metropolitan Region is explored as it is experiencing an increasing spatial dispersion of economic activities, population and political power against an historical backdrop of strong centre-periphery relationships. Finally as a closure after analysing the spatial outcome of the Belo Horizonte Metropolitan Region and its perspectives, some questions are enrolled to help to understand the challenges posed to metropolitan planning, in the context of economic articulation with the more general global process and socio- environmental and political requirements usually prevailing at the local/metropolitan leve

Abstract

A two-stage study was carried out. Firstly, a pioneering attempt was made to measure the quality of education in rural areas of Poland, by county (powiat), using a synthetic indicator. Secondly, the socioeconomic determinants of that quality were modelled. A strength of this study is the fact that it covers the entire population of the given type of administrative units. The analysis served to verify the hypothesis that exogenic socioeconomic factors are key to the effectiveness of the educational process in rural areas. It was shown that in Poland the theories of polarised development are more applicable than those of endogenic development. There was observed an inversely proportional effect from the centre–periphery axis on education quality, but, above all, the effect of several gravitational systems, in which there occurs exogenic diffusion of the results of economic growth and progress from the present and former provincial capitals.