Search Results

1 - 10 of 65 items :

  • "carvacrol" x
Clear All

, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum and Blastocystis sp. to natural organic compounds. Parasitol Res 2007, 101(1):193-199. 4. Cavalcante Melo FH, Rios ER, Rocha NF, Citó Mdo C, Fernandes ML, de Sousa DP, de Vasconcelos SM, de Sousa FC: Antinociceptive activity of carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2- methylphenol) in mice. J Pharm Pharmacol 2012, 64(12):1722-1729. 5. Lima M da S, Quintans-Júnior LJ, de Santana WA, Martins Kaneto C, Pereira Soares MB, Villarreal CF: Anti-inflammatory effects of carvacrol: evidence for a key role of interleukin-10. Eur J Pharmacol 2013, 699:112-117. 6. Fan K, Li X

REFERENCES 1. Hugot JP, Aujard P, Morand S: Biodiversity in helminths and nematodes as a field of study: an overview. Nernatology. 2001, 3(3): 199-208. 2. Trailović SM, Marjanović DS, Nedeljković Trailović J, Robertson AP, Martin RJ: Interaction of carvacrol with the Ascaris suum nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, potential mechanism of antinematodal action. Parasitol Res. 2015, 114(8):3059-68. 3. Ribeiro JC, Ribeiro WLC, Camurça-Vasconcelos ALF, Macedo ITF, Santos JML, Paula HCB: Efficacy of free and nanoencapsulated

References Arunasree KM. (2010). Anti-proliferative eff ects of carvacrol on a human metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB 231. Phytomedicine 17: 581-588. Burt S. (2004). Essential oils: their antibacterial propertied and potential application in foods. A review. Int J Food Microbiol 94: 223-253. Carson DA, Ribeiro JM. (1993). Apoptosis and disease. The Lancet 341: 1251-1254. Dixon RA. (2001). Natural products and plant disease resistance. Nature 411: 843-847. Foo JB, Yazan LS, Chan KW, Tahir PM, Ismail M. (2013). Kenaf seed oil from supercritical carbon

.cardiores.2003.10.025 9. R. Masella R. Di Benedetto, R. Varì, C. Filesi and C. Giovannini, Novel mechanisms of natural antioxidant compounds in biological systems: involvement of glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes, J. Nutr. Biochem . 16 (2005) 577–586; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2005.05.013 10. R. Aeschbach, J. Löliger, B. C. Scott, A. Murcia, J. Butler, B. Halliwell and O. T. Aruoma, Anti-oxidant action of thymol, carvacrol, 6-gingerol, zingerone and hydroxytyrosol, Food Chem. Toxicol. 32 (1994) 31–36; https://doi.org/10.1016/0278-6915(84)90033-4 11. N

: Interaction of carvacrol with the Ascaris suum nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, potential mechanism of antinematodal action. Parasitol Res. 2015, 114(8): 3059-3068. 9. Marjanović SDj, Bogunović D, Milovanović M, Marinković D, Zdravković N: Antihelmintic activity of Carvacrol, Thymol, Cinnamaldehyde and P-Cymen against the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and rat pinworm Syphacia muris. Acta Vet-Beograd 2018, 68(4): 445-456. 10. Norton RA, Ruff MD: Nematodes and Acanthocephalans. In: Saif YM, Barnes HJ, Glisson JR, Fadly AM

plate. Methods Mol Biol 2014; 1149:631-41. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0473-0_48 17. Rattanachaikunsopon P, Phumkhachorn P. Assessment of factors influencing antimicrobial activity of carvacrol and cymene against Vibrio cholerae in food. J Biosci Bioeng 2010; 110:614-9. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiosc.2010.06.010 18. Ultee A, Bennik MHJ, Moezelaar R. The phenolic hydroxyl group of carvacrol is essential for action against the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Appl Environment Microbiol 2002; 68:1561-8. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.68

–2792. Bergsson G, Arnfinnsson J, Steingrimsson O, Thormar H (2001): Killing of Gram-positive cocci by fatty acids and monoglycerides. APMIS, 109, 670–678. doi: 10.1034/j.1600-0463.2001.d01-131.x. Burt S (2004): Essential oils: their antibacterial properties and potential applications in foods – a review. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 94, 223–253. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.03.022. Castillo S, Perez-Alfonso CO, Martinez-Romero D, Guillen F, Serrano M, Valero D (2014): The essential oils thymol and carvacrol applied in the packing lines avoid lemon spoilage

Abstract

Thymus fedtschenkoi Ronniger (Lamiaceae) is a permanent, that grows in some mountain rangelands of Iran, including Mazandaran province. The aerial parts of Thymus fedtschenkoi were collected during flowering stage in June 2012, from mountain rangelands of Mazandaran province, in north of Iran. Samples were collected from five altitudes (1300 m, 1600 m, 2000 m, 2400 m and 3000 m) in mountain region of Mazandaran province. The goal of current research was to assessment the effect of altitude on the chemical composition and function of essential oil in Thymus fedtschenkoi. The essential oil were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas spectrometry (GC-MS). Based on the results, the essential oil content is between 0.92-1.31%, at different altitudes. The highest content of essential oil (1.31%%) was extracted in the highest altitude (3000 m), while it was opposite (0.92%) in the lowest altitude (1300 m). The main essential oil compounds of Thymus fedtschenkoi samples were thymol (8.62%-36.86%), carvacrol (6.787%-68.39%), γ-terpinene (1.473T-6.461%), p-cymen (5.764%-16.204%) and linalool (0.465%-6.457 6.8%). According to the results, altitude has a positive effect on the percentage of essential oils and essential oil increases with increasing altitude. The altitude has a negative effect on the percentage of thymol and the content of thymol decreased with increasing altitude. The altitude has a positive effect on the percentage of carvacrol and the content of carvacrol increased with increasing altitude.

Abstract

Thymus trauvetteri Klokov & Desj. (Lamiaceae) is a permanent species that grows in some mountain rangeland of Iran including Mazandaran province. The aerial parts of Thymus trauvetteri were collected during flowering stage in June 2014, from mountain rangelands of Mazandaran province,in North of Iran. Around samples collected from four altitudes (2100 m, 2400 m, 2700 m and 3000 m) in mountain region of Mazandaran province. The goal of current research was to assess the effect of altitude on the chemical composition and function of essential oil in Thymus trauvetteri. The essential oil were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas spectrometry (GC-MS). Based on the results, the essential oil content is between 1.01-1.51% at different altitudes. The highest essential oil (1.51%%) was extracted at an altitude of 2400 m, while it was opposite (1.01%) at an altitude of 3000 m. The main compounds essential oil of Thymus trauvetteri samples were identified: thymol (5.93%-49.75%), carvacrol (1.78%-54.02%), and p-cymen (6.98%-19.07%). According to the results, altitude was significantly (p≤ 0.05) effective on essential oil, thymol, carvacrol and p-cymen rates according to results of correlation analysis. The highest percentage of essential oil is at an altitude of 2400 m and the lowest is 3000 m above sea level. The highest percentage of thymol is in L3 (2700 m) and lowest is in L1 (2100 m). The highest percentage of carvacrol is in L3 (2700 m) and lowest is in L4 (3000 m). The highest percentage of p-cymen is in L1, L2, L3 (2100, 2400 and 2700 m, no significant difference) and lowest is in L4 (3000 m). Variations in essential oil rates and compositions may be due to on genetic, ecological or individual variability.

Summary

Introduction: The potato tuber moth (PTM) is the major economic pest of potato. Different approaches were tried to prevent and control this pest including natural pesticides and synthetic fumigants.

Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the insecticidal activity of the essential oils of thyme and myrtle. In addition to evaluating the insecticidal activity of carvacrol and eucalyptol against the different life stages of potato tuber moth using a fumigation bioassays.

Methods: Thyme and myrtle oils were extracted from wild Thymus syriacus Boiss. and wild Myrtus communis L. by hydrodistillation. Fumigation experiments were conducted on potato tuber moth of different stages of development (eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults), using standard methods. The potato tuber moth was treated for different periods using different concentrations of the essential oils. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied on the mortality percentages data to estimate the significance of differences between treatments at p<0.05. Probit analysis was used to estimate the LC50, LC90 and LT50.

Results: Adult stage was the most sensitive to essential oils vapours with LC50 value of 0.5 μl/l air. Whereas, pupal stages were the most tolerant. The essential oil of thyme possessed the strongest fumigant toxicity against eggs with a LC50 value of 6.1 μl/l air. The two monoterpens showed varied fumigant toxicity against adult stage. Carvacrol achieved 100% mortality at 0.125 μl/l air after 6 h, and 0.025 μl/l air after 48h exposure with LT50 period of 0.5 h.

Conclusion: The present work demonstrated that T. syriacus essential oil is a promising natural fumigant against the different developmental stages of PTM.