Search Results

1 - 10 of 265 items :

  • "cancer therapy" x
Clear All
Cancer therapy induced cardiotoxicity: monitoring

Abstract

Background: Chemotherapies are highly effective in treating most cancers, but their use is limited by potential cardiotoxicity, the most serious of a wide range of adverse effects. The severity of these effects is related to the chemotherapy regimen, patient population characteristics and duration.

Objective: To review strategies to reduce cardiotoxicity in patients who receive chemotherapies.

Materials and Method: We reviewed and abstracted information from published peer review journals and provided examples from our relevant experiences.

Results: The severity of these effects is related to the chemotherapy regimen, patient population characteristics and duration. The incidence of cardiomyopathy because of chemotherapy varies and its onset can be acute (during or shortly after treatment), sub-acute (within days or weeks after completion of chemotherapy) or chronic (weeks to months after drug administration). A number of risk factors may predispose a patient to certain cancer therapy-induced cardiotoxicities. These can be identified, monitored, and possibly modified before initiation of cancer therapy so that cardiotoxicity can be prevented where possible.

Conclusion: Cardiotoxicity is an adverse event associated with many cancer therapy agents. The potential for cardiotoxic events should be recognized before therapy is started and serial monitoring of ventricular performance in order to minimize the possibility of irreversible cardiac damage.

Open access
Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Potential Apoptosis Inducers in Cancer Therapy

;2010:183097. 4. Antonarakis ES, Emadi A. Ruthenium-based chemotherapeutics: are they ready for prime time? Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2010;66(1):1-9. 5. Pongratz M, Schluga P, Jakupec MA, Arion VB, Hartinger CG, et al. Transferrin binding and transferrinmediated cellular uptake of the ruthenium coordination compound KP1019, studied by means of AAS, ESI-MS and CD spectroscopy. J Anal At Spectrom. 2004; 19:46–51. 6. Mari C, Pierroz V, Ferrari S, Gasser G. Combination of Ru(II) complexes and light: new frontiers in cancer therapy. Chem Sci. 2015;6(5):2660-86. 7

Open access
Lymphedema following cancer therapy in Slovenia: a frequently overlooked condition?

Lymphedema following cancer therapy in Slovenia: a frequently overlooked condition?

Introduction. Secondary lymphedema following cancer therapy is a frequent, often painful, quality of life disturbing condition, reducing the patients' mobility and predisposing them to complications, e.g. infections and malignancies. The critical aspect of lymphedema therapy is to start as soon as possible to prevent the irreversible tissue damage.

Patients and methods. We performed a retrospective study of patients with lymphedema, treated at the Department of Dermatovenereology, University Medical Center Ljubljana, from January 2002 to June 2010. The patients' demographic and medical data were collected, including type of cancer, type and stage of lymphedema, and time to first therapy of lymphedema. The number of referred patients with lymphedema following the therapy of melanoma, breast cancer, and uterine/cervical cancer, was compared to the number of patients expected to experience lymphedema following cancer therapy, calculated from the incidence reported in the literature.

Results. In the period of 8.5 years, 543 patients (432 females, 112 males) with lymphedema were treated. The results show that probably many Slovenian patients with secondary lymphedema following cancer therapy remain unrecognized and untreated or undertreated. In the majority of our patients, the management of lymphedema was delayed; on average, the patients first received therapy for lymphedema 3.6 years after the first signs of lymphedema.

Conclusions. To avoid a delay in diagnosis and therapy, and the complications of lymphedema following cancer therapy, the physician should actively look for signs or symptoms of lymphedema during the follow-up period, and promptly manage or refer the patients developing problems.

Open access
An overview of microtubule targeting agents for cancer therapy

, Davis RA, Nelson CC. 6α-acetoxyanopterine, a novel structure class of mitotic inhibitor disrupting microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells. Mol Cancer Ther 2017;16:3–15. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0325 78. Williams RB, Martin SM, Lawrence JA, Norman VL, O’Neil-Johnson M, Eldridge GR, Starks CM. Isolation and identification of the novel tubulin polymerization inhibitor bifidenone. J Nat Prod 2017;80:616–24. doi: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.6b00893 79. Mukhtar E, Mustafa Adhami V, Mukhtar H. Targeting microtubules by natural agents for cancer therapy. Mol

Open access
Bcl-2 Family Proteins in Development and Treatment of Malignant Diseases

-19. Amundson SA, Myers TG, Scudiero D, Kitada S, Reed JC, Fornace AJ. An informatics approach identifying markers of chemosensitivity in human cancer cell lines. Cancer Res 2000; 60(21): 6101-10. Hockenbery DM. Targeting mitochondria for cancer therapy. Environ Mol Mutagen. 2010; 51(5): 476-89. Weiss LM, Warnke RA, Sklar J, Cleary ML. Molecular analysis of the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation in malignant lymphomas. N Engl J Med. 1987; 317(19): 1185-1189. Cleary ML, Smith SD, Sklar J. Cloning and

Open access
A Review on DNA Repair Inhibition by PARP Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy

REFERENCES 1. Martin NM. DNA repair inhibition and cancer therapy. J Photochem Photobiol B 2001;63(1):162-70. 2. Piskunova TS, Yurova MN, Ovsyannikov AI, et al. Deficiency in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) accelerates aging and spontaneous carcinogenesis in mice. Curr Gerontol Geriatr Res 2008;2008:754190. 3. Espinoza LA, Smulson ME, Chen Z. Prolonged poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity regulates JP-8-induced sustained cytokine expression in alveolar macrophages. Free Radic Biol Med 2007;42(9):1430-40. 4. Zerfaoui M, Suzuki Y

Open access
Nanoparticles in therapeutic applications and role of albumin and casein nanoparticles in cancer therapy

carriers for cancer therapy. BioMed Research International. 2014, Article ID 180549, 12 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/180549 (reference [ 6 ]) under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) license. Figure 2 Process involved in coacervation for the preparation of nanoparticles and crosslinking the particles using glutaraldehyde. Reproduced from Julien Nicolas, Simona Mura, Davide Brambilla, Nicolas Mackiewicz and Patrick Couvreur. Design, functionalization strategies and biomedical applications of targeted biodegradable

Open access
Development of a Thai version of the neutropenia subscale for the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Neutropenia questionnaire

neutropenia have been found to have symptoms of fatigue, impairment of physical and social functions, and low coping ability [ 6 ]. A significant correlation between increasing grades of neutropenia with symptom burden and HRQOL was reported after a prospective study [ 7 ]. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Neutropenia (FACT-N) questionnaire assesses self-reported symptoms and impact on HRQOL associated with neutropenia. The FACT-N questionnaire consists of the 27-item Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General (FACT-G), which assesses core HRQOL, and a

Open access
Sodium-glucose cotransporters: new targets of cancer therapy?

Abstract

Glucose, the key source of metabolic energy, is imported into cells by two categories of transporters: 1) facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) and 2) secondary active sodium-glucose cotransporters (SGLTs). Cancer cells have an increased demand for glucose uptake and utilisation compared to normal cells. Previous studies have demonstrated the overexpression of GLUTs, mainly GLUT1, in many cancer types. As the current standard positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (2-FDG) for imaging tumour cells via GLUT1 lacks in sensitivity and specificity, it may soon be replaced by the newly designed, highly sensitive and specific SGLT tracer α-methyl-4-(F-18)fluoro-4-deoxy-Dglucopyranoside (Me-4FDG) in clinical detection and tumour staging. This tracer has recently demonstrated the functional activity of SGLT in pancreatic, prostate, and brain cancers. The mRNA and protein expression of SGLTs have also been reported in colon/colorectal, lung, ovarian, head, neck, and oral squamous carcinomas. So far, SGLTs have been poorly investigated in cancer, and their protein expression and localisation are often controversial due to a lack of specific SGLT antibodies. In this review, we describe current knowledge concerning SGLT1 and SGLT2 (over)expression in various cancer types. The findings of SGLTs in malignant cells may help in developing novel cancer therapies with SGLT2 or SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors already used in diabetes mellitus treatment.

Open access
Magnetic nanoparticles as targeted delivery systems in oncology

magnetofection for the treatment of feline fibrosarcomas: a phase I trial. J Gene Med 2008; 10: 655-67. Lu Y, Madu CO. Viral-based gene delivery and regulated gene expression for targeted cancer therapy. Expert Opin Drug Deliv 2010; 7: 19-35. Russ V, Wagner E. Cell and tissue targeting of nucleic acids for cancer gene therapy. Pharm Res 2007; 24: 1047-57. Wolff JA, Malone RW, Williams P, Chong W, Acsadi G, Jani A, et al. Direct gene transfer into mouse muscle in vivo. Science 1990; 247

Open access