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Ultra-High Temperature Effect on Bioactive Compounds and Sensory Attributes of Orange Juice Compared with Traditional Processing

. Prod. Radiance, 3 (1), 12–15. Plaza, L., Crespo, I., de Pascual-Teresa, S., De Ancos, B., Sanchez-Moreno, C., Munoz, M., Cano, M.P. (2011). Impact of minimal processing on orange bioactive compounds during refrigerated storage. Food Chem., 124 (2), 646–651. Polydera, A. C., Stoforos, N. G., Taoukis, P. S. (2005). Quality degradation kinetics of pasteurised and high pressure processed fresh Navel orange juice: Nutritional parameters and shelf life. Innov. Food Sci. Emerg. Technol., 6 (1), 1–9. Rao, A. V. Rao, L. G. (2007). Carotenoids and

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Current Approaches for Enhanced Expression of Secondary Metabolites as Bioactive Compounds in Plants for Agronomic and Human Health Purposes – a Review

.S., Doyon G.G., Sylvain J.F., Lacroix M.M. Analyzing cranberry bioactive compounds. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr., 2010, 50, 872-888. 18. Dombrecht B., Xue G.P., Sprague S.J., MYC2 differentially modulates diverse jasmonate-dependent functions in Arabidopsis . Plant Cell, 2007, 19, 2225-2245. 19. Du H., Huang Y., Tang Y., Genetic and metabolic engineering of isoflavonoids biosynthesis. Appl. Microb. Biotechnol., 2010, 86, 1293-1312. 20. Evangelista Z.M., Moreno A.E., Metabolitos secundarios de importancia farmacéutica

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Determination of Bioactive Compounds and Mineral Substances in Latvian Birch and Maple Saps

Abstract

Birch and maple saps contain carbohydrates and organic acids, B complex vitamins and vitamin C, tannins, flavonoids, glycosides and mineral substances. The aim of the study was to quantitatively determine the concentrations of bioactive compounds and mineral substances in Latvian birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and maple (Acer platanoides L.) saps. Electrical conductivity was determined (629 and 967 S/cm in birch and maple saps, respectively) to characterise the total amount of mineral substances. In birch and maple saps the titratable acidity (0.50 and 0.70 mmol of NaOH per litre of sap, respectively) and formol number (0.25 and 0.20 mmol NaOH per litre of sap, respectively) were determined. The protein concentration was found to be higher in maple sap (171 and 127 mg/l, respectively). The antioxidant concentration, determined using quercetin as a standard, was 0.35 mg of quercetin equivalents (QE)/l in birch sap and 0.77 mg QE/l in maple sap. In conclusion, Latvian maple sap contains more bioactive and mineral compounds than birch sap. Latvian birch sap contains up to 20% more glucose and fructose than birch sap produced in Finland, but Latvian maple sap contains 10 to 40% less sucrose than sap produced in North America.

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Vitamin C, Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Broccoli Florets Grown under Different Nitrogen Treatments Combined with Selenium

.M., Heller L.I., Rutzke M., Welch R.M., Kochian L.V., Li L., Molecular and biochemical characterization of the selenocysteineSe- methyltransferase gene and Se-methylselenocysteine synthesis in broccoli. Plant Physiol., 2005, 138, 409-420. 14. Mahn A., Modelling of the effect of selenium fertilization on the content of bioactive compounds in broccoli heads. Food Chem., 2017, 233, 492-499. 15. Mahn A., Zamorano M., Barrientos H., Reyes A., Optimization of a process to obtain selenium-enriched free-dried broccoli with high antioxidant

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Goji Berry (Lycium barbarum): Composition and Health Effects – a Review

://www.dominion-seed-house.com/upload/GOJI_AN.pdf ]. 19. Donno D., Beccaro G.L., Mellano M.G., Cerutti A.K., Bounous G., Goji berry fruit ( Lycium spp .): antioxidant compound fingerprint and bioactivity evaluation. J. Funct. Food., 2015, doi:10.1016/j.jff.2014.05.020. 20. dos Reis B.A., Kosińska–Cagnazzo A., Schmitt R., Andlauer W., Fermentation of plant material – Effect on sugar content and stability of bioactive compounds. Pol. J. Food Nutr. Sci., 2014, 64, 235–241. 21. Gan L., Zhang S.H., Liang Yang X., Bi Xu H., Immunomodulation and antitumor activity by a polysaccharide-protein complex from Lycium

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Bioactive Compounds in Tomatoes at Different Stages of Maturity

, 449–455. De Sousa, F. A., Neves, A. N., De Queiroz, M. E. L. R., Heleno, F. F., Teofilo, R., F., de Pinho, G. P. (2014). Influence of ripening stages of tomatoes in the analysis of pesticides by gas chromatography. J. Braz. Chem. Soc ., 25 (8), 1431–1438. Del Giudice, R., Raiola, A., Tenore, G.C., Frusciante, L., Baron, A., Monti, D.M., Rigano, M. M. (2015). Antioxidant bioactive compounds in tomato fruits at different ripening stages and their effects on normal and cancer cells. J. Funct. Foods , 18 , 83–94. Dumas, Y., Dadomo, M., Di Lucca, G

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Evaluation of Agro-Industrial Co-Products as Source of Bioactive Compounds: Fiber, Antioxidants and Prebiotic

.A., Roberfroid, M.B. 2004. Dietary modulation of the human colonic microbiota: updating the concept of prebiotics. Nutrition Research Reviews , 17(2): 259-275. DOI: 10.1079/NRR200479. 20. González-Montelongo, R., Lobo, M.G., & González, M. (2010). Antioxidant activity in banana peel extracts: Testing extraction conditions and related bioactive compounds. Food Chemistry , 119, 1030-1039. DOi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2009.08.012. 21. Gorinstein, S., Martin-Belloso, O., Lojek, A., Cíz, M., Soliva-Fortuny, R., Park, Y.-S., Caspi, A., Libman, I. & Trakhtenberg, S. (2002

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Fermentation of Plant Material - Effect on Sugar Content and Stability of Bioactive Compounds

Nutr. Sci., 2012, 62, 241-250. 7. Engelhardt U.H., Lakenbrink C, Lapczynski S., Antioxidative phenolic compounds in green-black tea and other methylxanthine-containing beverages. ACS Symposium Series, 2000, 754, 111-118. 8. Fraser P.D., Bramley PM., The biosynthesis and nutritional uses of carotenoids. Prog. Lipid Res., 2004, 43, 228-265. 9. Horszwald A., Andlauer W, Characterisation of bioactive compounds in berry juices by traditional photometric and modern microplate methods. J. Berry Res., 2011, 1, 189-199. 10. Hur S.J., Lee S.Y., Kim Y.-C, Choi I., Kim G

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Bioactive Compounds in Latvian Beer

Abstract

Beer is a complex mixture - over 400 different compounds have been characterized in beer. Significant health and product quality promoting benefits have been attributed to its bioactive secondary metabolites such as phenolics. Polyphenols and phenolic acids present in beer are natural antioxidants. The aim of the research was to characterize the bioactive compounds in Latvian barley beer, such as phenolic acids and flavanols. In an experiment, different lager-type beers produced in Latvia were analysed. The total phenolic content was determined spectrophotometrically according to the Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and expressed as gallic acid equivalents. Individual phenolic compounds were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The antioxidant potential of beer was analyzed by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydraziyl (DPPH) radical assays and expressed as micromoles of Trolox equivalents. The research showed that the total phenolic content of dark beer samples (320.8-863.6 mg GE L-1) was mostly higher than that of the light beers (300.9-475.2 mg GE L-1). In total, eleven phenols were determined in the analysed samples. Also the sum of individual phenolics in dark beer samples was higher than in the light beer brands. All beer samples exhibited a strong DPPH radical scavenging activity: from 441.3 to 1064.2 μmol TE L-1 for the light beer samples, and from 726.2 to 1748.7 μmol TE L-1 for the dark beer. The research suggests that composition of beer phenolic compounds was not dependent on the type of beer - light or dark.

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Monitoring of Bioactive Compounds of Tomato Cultivars as Affected by Mulching Film

physicochemical parameters, bioactive compounds and sensorial attributes. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 67, 139–144. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2014.02.018. Zushi K, Matsuzoe N (2009): Seasonal and cultivar differences in salt-induced changes in antioxidant system in tomato. Scientia Horticulturae, 120, 181–187. doi: 10.1016/j.scienta.2008.10.005.

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