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Transient bioimpedance monitoring of mechanotransduction in artificial tissue during indentation

mechanotransduction are explored using viable artificial tissue-engineered skin in the form of an alginate encapsulated fibroblast. The artificial skin, which is considered to be a model system, is kept viable via a bespoke microfluidic system with integrated coplanar impedance sensors. Accurate normal loads are applied to the exposed surface of the artificial skin via indentation at small and large strains and the impedance monitored in real-time at a fixed single frequency. The fabrication of the microfluidic system and impedance sensors is described. The electrical properties of

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The use of artificial dermis for corrective surgery on burn scars

Bollero D Epidemiology and risk factors for pathologic scarring after burn wounds Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2008 10 93 102 5 Iwuagu FC, Wilson D, Bailie F. The use of skin grafts in post burn contracture release: a 10 year review. Plast Rec Surg. 1999; 103:1198 10.1097/00006534-199904010-00015 Iwuagu FC Wilson D Bailie F. The use of skin grafts in post burn contracture release: a 10 year review Plast Rec Surg. 1999 103 1198 6 Suzuki S, Matsuda K, Isshiki N, Tamada Y, Ikada Y. Experimental study of a newly developed bilayer artificial skin

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Development and characterization of thermosensitive pluronic-based metronidazole in situ gelling formulations for vaginal application

, R. Page and K. Barnhart, Vaginal distribution of Replens and K-Y jelly using three imaging techniques, Contraception   77 (2008) 195-204; DOI: 10.1016/j.contraception.2007.11.016. I. R. Schmolka, Artificial skin. I. Preparation and properties of pluronic F-127 gels for the treatment of burns, J. Biomed. Mater. Res.   6 (1972) 571-582; DOI: 10.1002/jbm.820060609. H. G. Choi, J. H. Jung, J. M. Ryu, S. J. Yoon, Y. K. Oh and C. K. Kim, Development of in situ-gelling and mucoadhesive acetaminophen liquid

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Original article. Cinnamic aldehyde inhibits proliferation and invasion in a well-defined 3-dimensional culture of human cutaneous melanoma cells in tissue engineered-skin

References 1. Yannas IV, Burke JF. Design of an artificial skin I basic design principles. J Biomed Mater Res. 1980; 14:65-81. 2. Rheinwald JG, Green H. Serial cultivation of strains of human epidermal keratinocytes: the formation of keratinising colonies from single cells. Cell. 1975; 6: 331-43. 3. Regnier M, Prunieras M, Woodley D. Growth and differentiation of adult human epidermal cells on dermal substrates. Front Matrix Biol. 1981; 9:4-35. 4. Bell E, Sher S, Hull B, Merrill C, Rosen S

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Surface Morphology of Polyimide Thin Film Dip-Coated on Polyester Filament for Dielectric Layer in Fibrous Organic Field Effect Transistor

(12): p. H995-H998. [29] Kim, J., et al., All-solution-processed bottom-gate organic thin-film transistor with improved subthreshold behaviour using functionalized pentacene active layer. Journal of Physics D-Applied Physics, 2009. 42(11). [30] Choi, M. H., et al., Effect of active layer thickness on environmental stability of printed thin-film transistor. Organic Electronics, 2009. 10(3): p. 421-425. [31] Someya, T., et al., A large-area, flexible pressure sensor matrix with organic field-effect transistors for artificial skin applications. Proceedings of the

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Polyimide Dielectric Layer on Filaments for Organic Field Effect Transistors: Choice of Solvent, Solution Composition and Dip-Coating Speed

-area, flexible pressure sensor matrix with organic field-effect transistors for artificial skin applications. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2004; 101: 9966-70.

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