Search Results

1 - 6 of 6 items :

  • "artificial languages" x
Clear All
Linguistic Justice Requires an Artificial Language: a Comment on van Parijs

Abstract

In advocating the use of a global auxiliary language, Van Parijs forms part of a tradition that stretches back to the seventeenth century. However, he differs from this tradition in promoting the use of English rather than an artificial language of some sort. This paper examines the theoretical situation that van Parijs proposes as the most fair, in which English functions worldwide as the preferred auxiliary language and in which certain measures have been taken to counterbalance injustices of three types. I draw attention to injustices of each of these types done to speakers of English in that situation. This leads to the conclusion that proposals to use an artificial language as a global lingua franca that were made in the seventeenth and later centuries have a stronger case than van Parijs has argued.

Open access
Architectural Theory and Analytic Philosophy in the Interwar Period

Abstract

The basis of the connection between analytic philosophy and architecture theory was developed in the interwar period. The results of analytic philosophy – especially the neo-positivism of Vienna Circle – and modern, functionalist architecture theory were utilized in an interdisciplinary approach. The comparison was based on language puzzles, science-based building processes, the method of justification and verification, and designing an artificial language in order to express the theoretical (philosophical) and the practical (architectural) approach as well. The functionality was based on the modern way of architectural thinking that relied on the results of Carnapian neo-positivism. Interpreting modern architecture is possible by referring to the keywords of logical positivism: empiricism, logic, verification, unity of language, and science.

In my paper, I first list the bases of the comparison between the philosophy of the Vienna Circle and the architecture theory of the interwar period – the Bauhaus and Le Corbusier. In the 2nd and 3rd sections, I show the dialectical succession between form and function. After that, I discuss the aesthetic verification of the turn of the century and the scientific justification of the interwar period. I focus on the interwar period with the positivist approach and the theory of the ‘new architecture’. I emphasize the importance of the language of science and the machine paradigm – in contrast to historicism.

Open access
Teachers’ Response to Serbian EFL Learners’ Pronunciation Errors

.” Language Awareness 9(1):34-51. Opitz, Bertram, Ferdinand, Nicola K., and Mecklinger, Axel. 2011. “Timing Matters: The Impact of Immediate and Delayed Feedback on Artificial Language Learning.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (5):1-9. Panova, Iliana and Lyster, Roy. 2002. “Patterns of corrective feedback and uptake in an adult ESL classroom.” TESOL Quarterly 36:573-595. Richards, Jack C. and Lockhart, Charles. 1994. Reflective Teaching in Second Language Classrooms . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Open access
The Swift and Secret Messenger: John Wilkins’s Mercury and the Paradoxes of Language

. Language, mind and nature: Artificial languages in England from Bacon to Locke. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Shuger, Debora K. 1997. Habits of thought in the English Renaissance: Religion, politics and the dominant culture. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Slaughter, Mary M. 1982. Universal languages and scientific taxonomy in the seventeenth century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Stillman, Robert E. 1995. The new philosophy and universal languages in seventeenth-century England: Bacon, Hobbes, and

Open access
Generic and Specific Numeral Classifier Input and its Relation to Children’s Classifier and Number Learning

artificial language learning paradigm. Language and Speech, 38 (3), 223-236. Mix, K.S., Sandhofer, C.M., Moore, J.A., & Russell, C. (2012). Acquisition of the cardinal word principle: Th e role of input. Early Childhood Research Qu arterly, 27 (2), 274-283. Moerk, E.L. (1980). Relationships between parental input frequencies and children’s language acquisition: A reanalysis of Brown’s data. Journal of Child Language, 7 (1), 105-118. Muraishi, S. (1983). Josuushi Tesuto [Classifier Tests]. In Kokuritsu Kokugo Kenkyuusho [Th e National

Open access
Representational Systems in Zoosemiotics and Anthroposemiotics Part I: What Have the So-Called “Talking Animals” Taught Us about Human Language?

African Grey Parrot: Preliminary evidence for auditory/vocal comprehension of the class concept. Animal Learning and Behavior , 11, 175–85. [65] Schusterman, R.J., Gisiner, R., 1988. Artificial language comprehension in dolphins and sea lions: The essential cognitive skills. The Psychological Record , 38, 311–48. [66] Beran, M.J., Pate, J.L., Richardson, W.K., et al., 2000. A Chimpanzee’s (Pan troglodytes) longterm retention of lexigrams. Animal Learning and Behavior , 28; 201–207. [67] Rumbaugh, D.M., 1977. Language behavior of apes. In Schrier, A

Open access