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Grošelj v inter-vjuju za Reporter Magazin: Torbica ni ogledalo ženske, lahko pa zelo veliko pove o njej [Marjeta Grošelj in an Interview for the Reporter Magazine: The Handbag is not the Mirror of the Woman, But it can Tell a Lot About Her]. Reporter . Retrieved May 16 th , 2019, from https://reporter.si/clanek/magazin/marjeta-groselj-v-intervjuju-za-reporter-magazin-torbica-ni-ogledalo-zenske-lahko-pa-zelo-veliko-pove-o-njej-647736 OECD. (2018). Skills Strategy Implementation Guidance for Slovenia. Improving the Governance of Adult Learning. OECD Publishing, Paris

Summary

Adults learning a minoritized language are potential new speakers, that is “adults who acquire a socially and communicatively consequential level of competence and practice in a minority language” (Jaffe, 2015; see also O’Rourke, Pujolar, & Ramallo, 2015). New speakers’ research has become quite common recently, marking a shift from traditional notions of speakerness in minority contexts, built around the Fishmanian discourse of reversing language shift (see Kubota, 2009). The new speaker—actually neo-speaker—is one of the seven categories put forward by Grinevald and Bert (2011), who considered them central to language revitalization. Answering the call for more data on new speakers of minoritized languages in O’Rourke, Pujolar, & Ramallo, 2015, this research aims to start the debate on the new speakers of Frisian (see Belmar, 2018; Belmar, Eikens, Jong, Miedema, & Pinho, 2018; and Belmar, Boven, & Pinho, 2019) by means of a questionnaire filled in by adults learning the language in the evening courses offered by Afûk. This article presents an analysis of their backgrounds, their attitudes towards the language, and their language use.

Abstract

High dropout rates are still a problem with online training. It is strongly suggested that learner characteristics influence the decision to persist in an online course or to drop out. The study explored the differences in domain-specific prior knowledge, motivation, computer attitude, computer anxiety, and learning skills between dropouts and active learners who enrolled in a vocational online training about media pedagogy for teachers. The data were collected from 575 trainee teachers from which three groups were formed: (a) students who only registered (n = 72) and (b) students who started learning but failed to complete any of the course modules (n = 124) and (c) active students who completed at least one module (n = 379). A dropout rate of 34.1% was observed. In general, only small effects were found. Students dropping out were older, had less prior knowledge, and lower skills in arranging an adequate learning environment.

Abstract

The rate of employment (or vice versa the rate of unemployment) is an important indicator of economic maturity and quality of life in a particular country. Compared to other countries of the European Union, unemployment in the Slovak Republic is a serious problem. Improving the quality and the efficiency of Slovak educational institutions can be one of the ways how to struggle with this problem. The Slovak economy has been transformed from planned economy to market economy, and, therefore, retraining, re-educations and improvement (in the field of industry and services) have been required. The Institute of Lifelong Learning is very helpful in this field. The article deals with shortcomings of the Institute of Lifelong Learning and it points out the reality leading to drawbackks. It also concerns the following possibilities, which might improve the current situation. In a theoretical analysis of the current state, we define the basic terms and problems in this field.

Abstract

This document presents the modelling and engagement process that emerge from content creation on a social network device. The latter is used informally and collaboratively to provide a meaningful learning environment and to constitute the distant side of a blended learning. This device puts into perspective the use of social network that can be beneficial for training. It also shows a creative approach to a mediation initially designed for entertainment. This is an action research project conducted in the form of grounded theory in the context of a communication course. The results of this research make it possible to understand the stakes of distant social experience on training. They are useful to the trainer through the conceptual modelling of processes. They are also useful for research that addresses training issues such as engagement through information and communication technologies. We finally see that this device can serve as a springboard for more immersive technologies such as artificial intelligence.

Abstract

This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that investigated seven female Saudi Arabian students of the University of Liverpool’s online Masters programmes. Qualitative, first-person research methods and hermeneutic phenomenology were chosen for the analysis and interpretation of transcripts (Langeveld, 1983; van Manen, 1997; Creswell, 2007, Roth, 2012). The principles of cultural anthropology (Hall & du Gay, 1996; Hannerz, 1992; Lull, 2001; Coleman, 2010) were used to take a snapshot of the interviewees’ particular world to provide an overview of the Saudi Arabian culture where the role of women is at the centre of academic, political, religious and social debate These findings reflect the participants’ everyday lives, identities, values and beliefs, presented in a self-reflective, personal ‘life-world’ story of one single Saudi Arabian woman. The findings demonstrate that the primary motivators in choosing online international education to further study are existing limitations of travelling to a university campus and customary gender-segregated education in Saudi Arabia. As a contrast, international online education offers the opportunity to gain up-to-date research-based knowledge in their chosen profession, learn critical thinking and problem solving skills and communicate with male and female students from different cultures.

Abstract

This study involved the creation of a corpus of children’s literature spanning 5.5 million words. Using concordance software, the corpus was able to show the most frequent words and collocations. These will be of interest both to literary researchers in the genre of children’s literature and also teachers and applied linguists working with adult students of English.

Abstract

Objective: The article defines features of formation and development of corporate universities in the USA and Canada.

Methodology: The article analyzes the dependence of successful functioning of the corporate universities on the choice of adequate training technologies; explores the essence and potentials of project-based learning as action learning which is focused on personnel development, business development and effective management of changes.

Findings: There is a close relationship between the performance of the functions of the corporate university and the forms, methods, learning technologies that are used in the learning process. Project-based learning is widely used in corporate universities in the United States and Canada; it provides an opportunity to gain managerial experience in real time, solves an important task of personnel development – formation of the ability to learn.

Value Added: The results of the research give ground to conclude that the corporate university in the US and Canada is a structural unit of a company, which performs certain functions that promote business efficiency.

Recommendations: The project topic should be related to current or future changes in the company. The solution of the problem should include diagnosing of the problem, analysis, recommendations, implementation phase, as also cooperation with members of the company.

References 1. Evans B, Armstrong D, Weinman J, Elliott L. Training trainers: a new approach for community medicine. Public 1990; 104: 3-8. 2. Novak Ž, Cerar VM, Rener-Primec Z, Dolžan V, Steblovnik L, Hawlina M. Why should one join a TTT program? Ask a colleague! - Or experience after a dozen of TTT workshops. Zdrav Vestn 2010; 79: 742-7. 3. Arogundade RA. Adult learning principles for effective teaching in radiology programmes: a review of the literature. West Afr J Med 2011; 30: 3-10. 4. Wood L, O‘Donnell E. Training the trainers: how to construct an

Summary

This study focuses on the motivation of adults learning a minority language, based on a tripartite model: integrative and instrumental (Gardner & Lambert, 1959; 1972) and personal (see Benson, 1991) motivation. Adults learning a minority language are potential new speakers, a group that has been described as central to language revitalisation (see Pujolar & O’Rourke, 2018). Since the motivation to learn these languages does not seem to be linked to economic success or wider job opportunities, researchers have taken interest in knowing what drives people to learn a minority language (e.g., O’Rourke & DePalma, 2016). In this study, (potential) new speaker motivations were investigated by means of ten open-ended interviews with adult learners of West Frisian—a minority language spoken in the Netherlands—in two different settings: Afûk Frisian courses (a more traditional learning setting) and Bernlef Frisian courses (a student association that offers informal courses for their members). The results show a predominance of integrative and personal motivation (also found in O’Rourke & DePalma, 2016), but not exclusively (as suggested by Jaffe, 2015) since the language appears to be tightly linked to the province and it is deemed beneficial—to a certain extent—for socioeconomic success in the province.