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Roles of Actors in Promoting Sustainable Development

Abstract

This paper was realised because a lack of a comprehensible classification of the actors (and their roles) in the sustainable development in literature and legislation and to create a classification which includes all the possible players involved the sustainable development (public, private and voluntary sectors). We used qualitative methods: analysing scientific literature concerning the subject; defining the terminology used; determining the importance of each type of player; analysing the relations between each type of actors; establishing a classification based on literature

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Armed non-state actors as a distinct research topic

Abstract

This article introduces the topic of armed non-state actors and briefly summarizes the contributions to this special issue.

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The Relation Between Military And Civilian Actors In Military Operations

Abstract

Looking at the current ongoing conflicts in the world, we can likely state that future armed conflicts will cover not only the solution of combat actions, but increasingly these conflicts must be addressed in cooperation with civilian actors. Although five years have passed since the introduction of the new strategic concept of NATO, which is declared for greater cooperation with civilian actors and the implementation of crisis management through a comprehensive involvement of both civilian and military components together, there are still critical issues interfere with successful collaboration to solve problems in the crisis area. One of the most important representatives of civilian actors are a humanitarian organization. And only each other getting to know can eliminate mutual distrust and thereby improve the final effect of the solving of crisis.

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Non-State Actors in Cyberspace Operations

Abstract

The growing importance of cyberspace to modern society, and its increasing use as an arena for dispute, is becoming a national security concern for governments and armed forces globally. The special characteristics of cyberspace, such as its asymmetric nature, the lack of attribution, the low cost of entry, the legal ambiguity, and its role as an efficient medium for protest, crime, espionage and military aggression, makes it an attractive domain for nation-states as well as non-state actors in cyber conflict.

This paper studies the various non-state actors who coexist in cyberspace, examines their motives and incitements, and analyzes how and when their objectives coincide with those of nation-states. Literature suggests that many nations are currently pursuing cyberwarfare capabilities, oftentimes by leveraging criminal organizations and irregular forces. Employment of such non-state actors as hacktivists, patriot hackers, and cybermilitia in state-on-state cyberspace operations has also proved to be a usable model for conducting cyberattacks. The paper concludes that cyberspace is emerging as a new tool for state power that will likely reshape future warfare. However, due to the lack of concrete cyberwarfare experience, and the limited encounters of legitimate cyberattacks, it is hard to precisely assess future effects, risks and potentials.

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Risk Management Responses to Armed Non-State Actor Risk in Afghanistan

Abstract

The article considers responses by different categories of actor to the threat of armed non-state actors in the international intervention in Afghanistan 2001-2015. Concepts from the sociology of risk, in particular risk-management and the distinction between operational and reputational risk, are related to field research in Afghanistan during the intervention. The ‘risk society’ approach of Beck (2009) is critiqued as relatively inapplicable to a discussion of differences in risks to and responses by different categories of actor. The article identifies some convergences of practice across three categories of intervening actor, civil-developmental, counter-insurgent and counter-terrorist, in particular tendencies to risk-transfer and remote-management that draws together theorisation of civil practice by Duffield (2010) and military practice by Shaw (2002). This is problematised relative to difficulties in managing tensions between operational risks to intervening actors and reputational risks vis-à-vis local actors.

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Accession to the European Union and Perception of External Actors in the Western Balkans

Abstract

This paper focuses on perceptions of the European Union (EU) and external actors (such as the United States, Russia, and Turkey) in six countries of the Western Balkans (WB) and Croatia in a comparative perspective. We present data generated by public opinion polls and surveys in all countries of that region in order to illustrate growing trends of EU indifferentism in all predominately Slavic countries of the region. In addition, there is an open rejection of pro-EU policies by significant segments of public opinion in Serbia and in the Republic of Srpska, Bosnia-Herzegovina. On the contrary, there is much enthusiasm and support for the West in general and the EU in particular in predominately non-Slavic countries, Kosovo and Albania. We argue that the WB as a region defined by alleged desire of all countries to join the the EU is more of an elite concept than that shared by the general population, which remains divided over the issue of EU membership. In explaining reasons for such a gap we emphasise a role of interpretation of the recent past, especially when it comes to a role the West played in the region during the 1990s.

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Types and Systems of Actors in Regional Development: Their Function and Regulatory Potential

Types and Systems of Actors in Regional Development: Their Function and Regulatory Potential

The evaluation of the actors in regional development is only one component/level within the regional research. However, it is a level which increases its significance and has or could have the key role in the sphere of regional development and at the same time reflects the problems on other levels. It is in fact the proportionality and balance of the whole system that determines the resulting effects of activities and regulatory competence of actors. If there is an imbalance - even an asymmetry - in this system, advocacy of only certain interests becomes understandably imminent, as well as a reduction of interactions (not only) in the organisation of regional society.

Differentiation of actors derives primarily from the distribution of power and wealth in a society, and thus it has always played an exceptionally significant role. However, as a consequence of the hierarchical organisation of the society this differentiation was noticeably asymmetrical. The non-equivalence of partial subjects/actors of regional development has led to the understandable domination of ‘deterministic’ relations and the plurality of interests and then to the dominance of ‘competitive’ relations. Only gradually do interactions of a cooperative kind successively break through the growth of mutual interconnections, linkages and necessity of social elements and partial systems, and thus the increasing of organic nature of (geo)societal systems. This will be finally illustrated through the difference between ‘symmetric’ systems of actors in developed countries and the ‘asymmetric’ global system.

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The Lithuanian Referendum on Extending the Working of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Station: The Rationality of Actors within (Un-)Changing Structures

The Lithuanian Referendum on Extending the Working of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Station: The Rationality of Actors within (Un-)Changing Structures

This article explores the structural factors and the arguments of the political actors in the Lithuanian referendum of 2008 on extending the working of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Station. By applying a new institutionalism theoretical perspective, this article studies campaign development, its structural framework and the actors' arguments. The presupposition has been confirmed that the value normative environment of the referendum was long-term and sustained, without any "paradigmatic shifts" during the referendum debates themselves. With that said, the equilibrium of competing normative attitudes was shifted towards agreeing with an extension of the work as a "minor evil". Within this structural environment, a range of "second order" features was typical for the referendum campaign model, additionally reinforced by another parallel (chronologically coinciding) campaign, that of the elections to the Seimas. Minor shifts in the otherwise overwhelming YES vote could be evoked by formal mechanical nuances, if nothing else. The diverse positions of the political actors involved in the campaign - whether active, critical, reluctant, or floating ones - were supposed to shift their opinion(s) within a stable structural value normative environment, not seeking any reconsideration. This model of referendum campaign development is typical for the Lithuanian direct democracy tradition. Frequently, a referendum serves as a supplementary formal institutional instrument allowing an expansion of the field of political debates and/or the possibility for political actors to place themselves within a stable value normative structure where they may strive for additional mobilization of behalf of their electorate.

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New Paradigms in the Actor’s Training – Awareness

, Y.Y., Holzel, B.K., Posner, M.I., published online on 18.03.2015, The neuroscience of mindfulness meditation , in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, AOP; DOI: 101038/nrn3916, 5 September 2017. Vainoras, A, Sendzikaite, E., Joffe, R., Grabstaite, V., Baleviciute, R., Telksnys, T., “Evaluation of the Cardiovascular Indicators of future Actors with Different Psyho-Emotional Status Performing Dramatic, Comic and Tragic Roles as well as Relaxation Exercises in Acting reconsidered – new approaches to actor’s work”, Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, Vilnius, 2014

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No effect of birth month or season on height in a large international sample of adults

actors and actresses. Psychol Rep 107(1):25-38. Waldie KE, Poulton R, Kirk IJ, Silva PA. 2000. The effects of pre- and post-natal sunlight exposure on human growth: Evidence from the Southern Hemisphere. Early Hum Dev 60(1):35-42. Weber GW, Prossinger H, Seidler H. 1998. Height depends on month of birth. Nature 391:754-55. Zhang W. 2011. Month of birth, socioeconomic background and height in rural Chinese men. J Biosoc Sci 43:641-656.

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