Search Results

1 - 10 of 34 items :

  • "Western Desert" x
Clear All
Structural Inversion Magnitude and its Impacts on the Hydrocarbon Accumulation

framework of Northern Western Desert, Egypt and its effect on hydrocarbon accumulations” EGPC 9th, Cairo, vol. 2 pp. 1-23, 1988. [6] A.R. Moustafa, “Mesozoic-Cenozoic Basin Evolution in the Northern Western Desert of Egypt” Geology of East Libya, vol. 3, pp. 29-46, 2008. [7] Schlumberger, “Well Evaluation Conference”, Egypt, pp. 87, 1995. [8] M. El Kammar, “Integrated geophysical study of East Bahariya and West wadi Elrayan, Western Desert, Egypt”. Master Thesis (unpublished): Cairo University, 2014. [9] S. Chopra, “What is seismic interpretation

Open access
Euglenoids from the El Farafra Oasis (Western Desert, Egypt)

systems on the basis of phytoplankton analysis. Catrina 11(1): 9-16. El-Otify A. M., Shafik H. M. & Szőke E. 2003. Analyses of physico-chemical characteristics and phytoplankton communities of Lake Nasser during the last two decades. Acta Bot. Hung. 45(1-2): 75-100. Elsheikh A. E. 2015. Mitigation of groundwater level deterioration of the Nubian Sandstone aquifer in Farafra Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. Environmental Earth Sciences 74(3): 2351-2367. Gaballa M. M. 2014. Phytoplankton and environmental variables as water

Open access
The Climate and Its Impacts on Egyptian Civilized Heritage: Ei-Nadura Temple in El- Kharga Oasis, Western Desert of Egypt As a Case Study

as it is related to climate geomorphology. Annals of Association of American Geologists, vol. 40, pp. 21.-236. Salman, A. B., et al, 2010: Environmental impact and natural hazards on El- Kharga Oasis monumental sites, Western Desert of Egypt, Journal of African Earth Sciences 58 (2010) 341-353. Soliman, S. M., 1998: Spheroidal exfoliation in sedimentary rock monuments. Sixth approach to environmental Geo-Egyptology. Sed. Egypt, 6: 1-11. Yaldiz, E., 2010: Climate effects on monumental buildings. Fac. Eng. Dep

Open access
Characterization of granites by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

of Minerals , 8, 257-267. Goldman D. S. (1979). A reevaluation of the Mössbauer spectroscopy of calcic amphiboles. American Mineralogist , 64, 109-119. Hassan K. M. (2005). Geochemical assessment of radioactive lava pockets in El-Seboah granite, Toshki area, south Western Desert, Egypt. Annals of the Geological Survey of Egypt , XXVIII, 195-204. Hassan K. M. (2008a). Characterization of granitic soil samples from Egypt by 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Isotope and Radiation Research

Open access
Evaluation Of Present-Day Climate-Induced Desertification In El-Dakhla Oasis, Western Desert Of Egypt, Based On Integration Of MEDALUS Method, GIS And RS Techniques.

techniques in fields of soil survey and mapping, A working document submitted to the forum organized by the National comity of soil sciences, Academy of Scientific Research and Technology. Egypt, May 18-19. Gad, A. and Lotfy, I. (2007) : Combined GIS and Remote Sensing techniques in Mapping Desertification Sensitivity in the North of the Western Desert, Egypt, Paper submited to the Second National GIS Symposium in Saudi Arabia, Al-Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, April 23-25, 2007/Rabi II 6-8, 1428, http://www.saudigis.org/papers.aspx . Gao, F., Y. Jin, X. Li

Open access
Invasion of the predatory mosquito Culex (Lutzia) fuscanus in the western desert parts of Rajasthan, India

Abstract

The breeding of Culex (Lutzia) fuscanus WIEDEMAN was recorded during entomological surveys in Jodhpur, Bikaner, Jaisalmer and Bikaner. A detailed study of its biology has been carried out with reference to seasonal variation and breeding. Stable breeding populations of Culex fuscanus, a mosquito whose larvae are predacious and feed on other mosquito larvae, were found at seven localities in Jodhpur. Its larvae were found breeding in association with Anopheles, Aedes and Culex species in outdoor cemented tanks, mostly in the shade of trees. This is the first report of this species from the desert district of western Rajasthan.

Open access
Autumn Migration of Passerines in Bahariya Oasis, Egypt – Where Do They Come from and Where Do They Go?

Poland). Ring 24, 2: 15-29. Goodman S.M., Meininger P.L. (Eds). 1989. The birds of Egypt. Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford - New York. Goodman S.M., Meininger P.L., Mullié W.C. 1986. The birds of the Egyptian Western Desert. Misc. Publ. Univ. Michigan Mus. Zool. 172: 1-91. Gustafsson R., Hjort Ch., Ottosson U., Hall Ph. 2003. Birds at Lake Chad and in the Sahel of NE Nigeria 1997-2000. Ottenby Bird Observatory, http://www.sofnet.org/ofstn/apps/Nr%20181.pdf Hilgerloh G., Raddatz B. 2009. Weight gains by re

Open access
Calculation of temperature distribution and rheological properties of the lithosphere along geotransect in the Red Sea region

Abstract

The temperature model of the lithosphere along profile passing through the Red Sea region has been derived using 2D integrated geophysical modelling method. Using the extrapolation of failure criteria, lithology and calculated temperature distribution, we have constructed the rheological model of the lithosphere in the area. We have calculated the strength distribution in the lithosphere and constructed the strength envelopes for both compressional and extensional regimes. The obtained results indicate that the strength steadily decreases from the Western desert through the Eastern desert towards the Red Sea where it reaches its minimum for both compressional and extensional regime. Maximum strength can be observed in the Western desert where the largest strength reaches values of about 250–300 MPa within the upper crust on the boundary between upper and lower crust. In the Eastern desert we observe slightly decreased strength with max values about 200–250 MPa within upper crust within 15 km with compression being dominant. These results suggest mostly rigid deformation in the region or Western and Eastern desert. In the Red Sea, the strength rapidly decreases to its minimum suggesting ductile processes as a result of higher temperatures.

Open access
The Eurasian Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus Scirpaceus) Breeding in Egypt – A New Evidence?

Abstract

Stêpniewska K., O¿arowska A. 2012. The Eurasian Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) breeding in Egypt - a new evidence? Ring 34: 45-50.

To date, the documented breeding range of the Eurasian Reed Warbler in Egypt is limited to the Nile Delta. In March and September 2001 two females with brood patches were caught in the Wadi El Rayan Protected Area (30°19’E, 29°12’N) in the Western Desert of Egypt. These records, if accepted, might shift the southern border of the breeding range of Reed Warblers in Egypt west of the Nile Delta. The two individuals were the only records of breeding Reed Warblers in Wadi El Rayan, suggesting that the breeding population is small. It is possible that the population has been established recently because artificial lakes were created in Wadi El Rayan in 1973. The studies during the breeding season are essential to determine if such probable breeders demonstrate a new, but permanent breeding population or only ephemeral incidents, as well as to collect the data on the number, breeding biology and biometrical characteristics of such local populations at the southern limit of the world breeding range of the Reed Warbler.

Open access
A Wild Roguery: Bruce Chatwin’s The Songlines Reconsidered

Abstract

This article revisits, analyzes and critiques Bruce Chatwin’s 1987 bestseller, The Songlines,1 more than three decades after its publication. In Songlines, the book primarily responsible for his posthumous celebrity, Chatwin set out to explore the essence of Central and Western Desert Aboriginal Australians’ philosophical beliefs. For many readers globally, Songlines is regarded as a—if not the—definitive entry into the epistemological basis, religion, cosmology and lifeways of classical Western and Central Desert Aboriginal people. It is argued that Chatwin’s fuzzy, ill-defined use of the word-concept “songlines”2 has had the effect of generating more heat than light. Chatwin’s failure to recognize the economic imperative underpinning Australian desert people’s walking praxis is problematic: his own treks through foreign lands were underpropped by socioeconomic privilege.

Chatwin’s ethnocentric idée fixe regarding the primacy of “walking” and “nomadism,” central to his Songlines thématique, well and truly preceded his visits to Central Australia. Walking, proclaimed Chatwin, is an elemental part of “Man’s” innate nature. It is argued that this unwavering, preconceived, essentialist belief was a self-serving construal justifying Chatwin’s own “nomadic” adventures of identity. Is it thus reasonable to regard Chatwin as a “rogue author,” an unreliable narrator? And if so, does this matter? Of greatest concern is the book’s continuing majority acceptance as a measured, accurate account of Aboriginal belief systems. With respect to Aboriginal desert people and the barely disguised individuals depicted in Songlines, is Chatwin’s book a “rogue text,” constituting an act of epistemic violence, consistent with Spivak’s usage of that term?

Open access