Search Results

1 - 10 of 2,972 items :

  • "Tradition" x
Clear All

and Composition. New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House. Datta, Birendranath. 2012. Cultural Contours of North East India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. Eisenstadt, Shmuel Noah. 1973. Post Traditional Societies and the Continuity and Reconstruction of Tradition. - Daedalus 102 (1): 1-27. Eisenstadt, Shmuel Noah. 2000. Multiple Modernities. - Daedalus 129 (1): 1-29. Gait, Edward A. 2013 [1962]. A History of Assam. Guwahati: New Book Stall. Gavin, Flood. 2005. An Introduction to Hinduism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Glassie, Henry. 1995. Tradition. - The

mniejszości narodowej w Polsce . Warsaw: Wydawnictwo Naukowe Scholar. Hobsbawm, E. 2012. “Introduction: Inventing Tradition” in The Invention of Tradition. E. Hobsbawm & T. Ranger (eds.). New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-14. Hrynycz, M. 2005. Instytut własnosti u zwyczajewo - prawowij kulturi ukrajinciw XIX - poczatku XX stolittia . Kiev: Institute of History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. Ichijo, A. & Ranta, R. 2016. Food, National Identity and Nationalism. From Everyday to Global Politics. London: Pallgrave MacMillian. Konieczny, Z

. [11] A rdalan, N, Bakhtiar, L., The Sense of Unity: The Sufi Tradition in Persian Architecture, 2nd ed, Kazi Publications, 2000. [12] M emarian, Gh. Sadoughi, A., Application of Access Graphs and Home Culture: Examining factors relative to climate and privacy in Iranian houses, Academic Journals, 2011, Vol. 6(30), pp. 6350-6363. [13] R apoport, A., House Form and Culture, Prentice-Hall, 1969. [14] M ehrgani. A., Optimum House for Rasht Peoples (Based on Their Behaviors and Influence Needs) With Special Reference to Mediocre Families, Berlin: Von der Fakultat VI

Abstract

Do Marjorie Garber’s premises that Shakespeare makes modern culture and that modern culture makes Shakespeare apply to his reception in Asian contexts? Shakespeare’s Asianization, namely adaptation of certain Shakespeare elements into traditional forms of local cultures, seems to testify to his timelessness in timeliness. However, his statuses in modern Asia are much more complicated. The complexity lies not only in such a cross-cultural phenomenon as the Asianizing practice, but in the Shakespearization of Asia-the idealization of him as a modern cultural icon in a universalizing celebration of his authority in many sectors of modern Asian cultures. Yet, the very entities of Asia, Shakespeare, modernity, and tradition must be problematized before we approach such complexities. I ask questions about Shakespeare’s roles in Asian conceptions of modernity and about the relationship between his literary heritage and Asian traditions. To address these questions, I will discuss this timeliness in Asian cultures with a focus on Shakespeare adaptations in Asian forms, which showcase various indigenous approaches to his text-from the elitist legacy maintaining to the popularist re-imagining. Asian practices of doing Shakespeare have involved other issues. For instance, whether or not the colonial legacies and postcolonial re-inventions in the dissemination of his works in Asian cultures confirm or subvert the various myths about both the Bard and modernity in most time of the 20th century; in what ways Shakespeare has been used as at once a negotiating agent and negotiated subject in the processes of the prince’s translations and adaptations into Asian languages, costumes, landscapes, cultures and traditions.

RES 11 (2/2019), p. 167-179 DOI: 10.2478/ress-2019-0013 Jüdische Elemente in der Tradition der Orthodoxen Kirche1. Ein Beitrag im Zeichen des Dialogs Ioan Moga* Jewish Elements in the Tradition of the Orthodox Church. A Contribution to Dialogue The present article deals with the question of Jewish and Christian-Orthodox dialogue. The author focuses on the ambivalences regarding the relation to Jewish heritage in the liturgical tradition of the Orthodox Church: on the one hand, an un-reflected anti-Judaism of the old byzantine texts (especially in the “Holy

, Evil Eye and Islamic Faith-Healing Traditions. - The Journal of Islamic Thought and Civilization 3 (2): 44-53. Qamar, Azher Hameed. 2015a. Being a Child in Rural Pakistan. - The Delhi University Journal of the Humanities and the Social Sciences 2: 100-111. Qamar, Azher Hameed. 2015b. Tona, the Folk Healing Practices in Rural Punjab, Pakistan. - Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics 9 (2): 59-74. Qamar, Azher Hameed. 2016. Belief in the Evil Eye and Early Childcare in Rural Punjab, Pakistan. - Asian Ethnology 75 (2): 397-418. Qamar, Azher Hameed. Forthcoming. Social

Abstract

This paper will explore the way that the poetry of David Jones, while generally recognised as being modernist, nevertheless promotes a continuation of the Western literary tradition (as opposed to more revolutionary strands of modernism), but does this while introducing a self-conscious understanding of the role and workings of tradition, an element lacking in pre-modern traditional literature. Other figures with a similar interest in the viability of a self-consciously understood practice of (literary or philosophical) tradition, in continuity with pre-modern tradition, but in modern conditions (Thomas Mann, John Henry Newman, Alasdair MacIntyre), will also be discussed.

Abstract

This paper will explore the way that the poetry of David Jones, while generally recognised as being modernist, nevertheless promotes a continuation of the Western literary tradition (as opposed to more revolutionary strands of modernism), but does this while introducing a self-conscious understanding of the role and workings of tradition, an element lacking in pre-modern traditional literature. Other figures with a similar interest in the viability of a self-consciously understood practice of (literary or philosophical) tradition, in continuity with pre-modern tradition, but in modern conditions (Thomas Mann, John Henry Newman, Alasdair MacIntyre), will also be discussed

Abstract

The “burden of the past” (W. J. Bate) has persistently remained in the focus of poets’ attention across various periods of the history of Western poetry. Questions of tradition, historical belatedness, and “anxieti[es] of influence” (H. Bloom) have fueled both theorists and practitioners of poetry. The English Pindaric tradition confronts these questions uniquely. It has shown consciousness of its own historicity from the beginning. The vocation of the Pindaric poet and his relation to the inimitable master, Pindar, persist as central themes throughout the reception history. They contribute to the evolution of a tradition where poets increasingly question the possibility of autonomous poetic creation.

Abstract

The “burden of the past” (W. J. Bate) has persistently remained in the focus of poets’ attention across various periods of the history of Western poetry. Questions of tradition, historical belatedness, and “anxieti[es] of influence” (H. Bloom) have fueled both theorists and practitioners of poetry. The English Pindaric tradition confronts these questions uniquely. It has shown consciousness of its own historicity from the beginning. The vocation of the Pindaric poet and his relation to the inimitable master, Pindar, persist as central themes throughout the reception history. They contribute to the evolution of a tradition where poets increasingly question the possibility of autonomous poetic creation