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Teaching Jessica: race, religion, and gender in The Merchant of Venice

References Ackermann, Z. & Schülting, S. (Eds.). (2011). Shylock nach dem Holocaust: zur Geschichte einer deutschen Erinnerungsfigur. Berlin: De Gruyter. Achinstein, S. (2001). John Foxe and the Jews. Renaissance Quarterly, 54 (1), 86-120. Adelman, J. (2008). Blood relations: Christian and Jew in The Merchant of Venice . Chicago: Chicago University Press. Alexander, C. M. S., & Wells, S. (Eds.). (2000). Shakespeare and race. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Anidjar, G. (2014). Blood: A critique of Christianity. New York

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Economic Nationalism in Haughton’s Englishmen for My Money and Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice

W orks C ited Adelman, Janet. Blood Relations: Christian and Jew in The Merchant of Venice. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2008. Auden, W. H. The Dyer’s Hand and Other Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 1968. Bartolovich, Crystal. “London’s the Thing: Alienation, the Market, and Englishmen for My Money. ” Huntington Library Quarterly 71 (2008): 137-56. Cohen, Walter. Drama of a Nation: Public Theater in Renaissance England and Spain. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1985. Coryat, Thomas. Coryat’s Crudities . Vol

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Māori take on Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice in Aotearoa/New Zealand

References Art New Zealand 13 (December 1979): 30-31. Best, Elsdon. The Māori . Two vols. Wellington: The Polynesian Society, 1924. Brown, Riwia. "Roimata". He Reo Hou: Five Plays by Māori Playwrights . Ed. Simon Garrett. Wellington, Playmarket, 1991. 164-218. Bulman, James C. Shakespeare in Performance: The Merchant of Venice . Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1991. Hooper, Elric. Personal communication. 24 June 2006

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Maritime Fantasies and Gender Space in Three Shakespearean Comedies

Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Merchant Seamen, Pirates, and the Anglo-American Maritime World, 1700-1750 . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Shakespeare, W. 1964. The Merchant of Venice . Ed. J. Russel Brown. The Arden Shakespeare ed. London: Methuen. ---. 1964. The Tempest . Ed. F. Kermode. The Arden Shakespeare ed. London: Methuen. ---. 1975. Twelfth Night . Ed. J. M. Lothian and T. W. Craik. The Arden Shakespeare ed. London: Methuen. Spencer, C. 1988. The Genesis of Shakespeare’s Merchant of

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“Shadowed Livery”: Morocco in The Merchant of Venice

Works Cited Adelman, Janet. Blood Relations: Christian and Jew in “The Merchant of Venice .” Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. Print. Bloom, Allan. Shakespeare’s Politics . New York: Basic Books, 1964. Print. Desai, R. W. “‘Mislike Me Not for My Complexion’: Whose Mislike? Portia’s? Shakespeare’s? Or That of His Age?” In The Merchant of Venice . New York: Norton, 2006. 304-321. Print. Dessen, Alan C. “The Elizabethan Stage Jew and Christian Example,” Shylock . Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea, 1991. 252-263. Print

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WHO IS THE REAL EVIL?: THE FEMALE CHALLENGING THE MALE IN THE MERCHANT OF VENICE AND MEASURE FOR MEASURE

References Benston, Alice N. 1979. “Portia, the Law, and the Tripartite Structure of The Merchant of Venice.” Shakespeare Quarterly 30(3):367-385. Bilello, Thomas C. 2004. “Accomplished with What She Lacks: Law, Equity, and Portia’s Con.” Law and Literature 16(1):11-32. Jameson, Anna Brownell. 2001. “Isabella Compared to Portia.” Measure for Measure. Ed. George L. Geckle. London: The Athlone Press, pp.74-80. Klause, John. 2012. Introduction. Measure for Measure. By William Shakespeare. Boston

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Readings of the Question of Rights in the Merchant of Venice--A Romanian Perspective

Abstract

It is the main aim of this essay to analyse the modulations and inflections introduced in the treatment of law in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice in the process of cross-cultural transmission and dissemination of the play in the nineteenth century. Focus will be placed on the shift of emphasis from issues related to the law in Shakespeare’s text to issues related to rights in two Romanian adaptations derived from French and German texts.

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“Which is the Merchant and which is the Jew?” a Žižekian Reading of the Jewish Question in The Merchant of Venice

Works Cited Adelman, Janet. Blood Relations: Christian and Jew in The Merchant of Venice . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2008. Cohen, Walter. “ The Merchant of Venice and the Possibilities of Historical Criticism.” Materialist Shakespeare: a History , edited by Ivo Kamps. London: Verso, 1995. Draper, John W. “Usury in ‘The Merchant of Venice’.” Modern Philology , vol.33, no.1, 1935, pp.37-47. Girard, Rene. “To Entrap the Wisest.” William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice , edited by Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea, 1986, pp. 91

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The Merchant in Venice: Shylock’s Unheimlich Return

Abstract

The first decades of the new millennium have seen an odd return to origins in Shakespeare studies. The Merchant in Venice, a site-specific theatrical production realized during the 500th anniversary year of the “original” Jewish Ghetto, was not only a highlight among the many special events commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016, but also a more creative and complex response to historicism. With her nontraditional casting of five Shylocks (developed through collaborations with scholars and students as well as her international, multilingual company), director Karin Coonrod made visible the acts of cultural projection and fracturing that Shakespeare’s play both epitomizes and has subsequently prompted. This article, written by a participant-observer commissioned to capture on video the making and performance of Compagnia de’ Colombari’s six-night run in the Campo del Ghetto Nuovo, explores the way this place is—and indeed, the category of place itself is always—a dynamic temporal construct, defying more complacent attempts at simple return (to home, to the text, to the past). Such a recognition allows nuanced, hybrid forms of multicultural theater and Shakespeare scholarship to emerge, and to collaborate more fruitfully.

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