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Five Years of Research Into Technology-Enhanced Learning at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology

technology-enhanced learning [online]. ICT Research in FP7 - Challenge 8: ICT for Learning and Access to Cultural Resources. [cit. 2011-02-15] Available at http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/ict/telearn-digicult/telearn_en.html Technology-enhanced learning [online]. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [cit. 2011-01-11]. Available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology-Enhanced_Learning Technology-enhanced learning [online]. Answers.com® [cit. 2011-01-11] Available at http://www.answers.com/topic/technology-enhanced-learning

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A Responsive Paradigm for Technology Enhanced Learning (Tel) Integration Into Business Organizations

experiences and perspectives of students in an online course: A case study. In Internet and Higher Education, 6, (pp. 77-90). 26. Wolpers, M. and Grohmann, G., (2005). PROLEARN: technology-enhanced learning and knowledge distribution for the corporate world. In International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, 1(1/2), (pp. 44-61). Retrieved from: http://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=6250 27. Wu, F. (2013). Development Research of E-learning in Chinese Enterprises. In the Proceedings of the International Conference on

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Technology Enhanced Learning for Humanities by Active Learning − the Sinus Project Approach

Abstract

The paper presents an approach to active learning facilitated by the use of semantic technologies. Some features of active learning and understanding of learning in humanities are discussed. The specifics of a well defined learning task - learner’s authoring of analytical materials, grounded by materials from a digital library - are analyzed to shape the functionality of experimental Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) environment with a built-in domain and pedagogical knowledge. The environment structure and realization are discussed and a learning example is presented.

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Sinus – A Semantic Technology Enhanced Environment For Learning In Humanities

-184. 6. SPARQL 1.1 Query Language. W3C Proposed Recommendation 8 November 2012. http://www.w3.org/TR/sparql11-query/ 7. Euzenat, J., P. Shvaiko. Ontology Matching. Springer, 2007. 8. Staykova, K., I. Hristov. Metadata Models for Technology Enhanced Learning in SINUS Project. - In: Proc. of the International Scientific Conference on Information Communication and Energy Systems and Technologies (ICEST’2010), Vol. 1 , 23-26 June 2010, Ohrid, Macedonia, ISBN 978-9989-786-57-0, 337-340. 9. Staykova, K., G. Agre. Use of

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Vocational Training Organisation Preparation to Introduce Technology Enhanced Training and Learning

Technology Enhanced Learning International Conference (TEL'03). (pp. 65-72). Italy: Milan. Owston, R., Archer, W., Garrison, R., & Vaughan, N. (2013). Blended learning in higher education: policy and implementation issues. The Internet and Higher Education, 9(2), 271-289. Available at: http://jolt.merlot.org/vol9no2/poon_0613.pdf (Accessed on 08/08/2016). Pedler, M. (2011). Action Learning in Practice. England: Gower Publishing, Ltd. Available at: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/ab0c/f1553f0715d329039d6a5125b665e44ddef5.pdf (Accessed on 15

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Critical Factors for Implementing Blended Learning in Higher Education

blended learning in higher education in Tanzania. International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, 2016, 12.2: 123. RHEM, James. Blended learning: Across the disciplines, across the academy. Stylus Publishing, LLC, 2012. SCHWEIGHOFER, Patrick; EBNER, Martin. Aspects to be considered when implementing technology enhanced learning approaches: A literature review. Future Internet, 2015, 7. 1 : 26-49. SHAND, Kristen; GLAS SE TT F ARRELL Y, Sus an; COST A, Victoria. Principles

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Problems Affecting Successful Implementation of Blended Learning in Higher Education - The Teacher Perspective

Abstract

An increased use of blended learning environments in higher education has been an emerging trend in the 21st century. Sometimes the definition of blended learning has been so broad that it makes it hard to find any learning environment in higher education that would not be included. Many research studies have been reporting the pros and cons of blended learning from the university perspective and the learner perspective. There are less studies on the teacher view of blended learning environments. This study had the aim to explore, analyse and discuss teachers’ perceived problems and barriers to a successful implementation of blended learning at university level. The used research strategy was a qualitative cross-sectional study where data has been collected with semistructured interviews. Six teachers that all are subject matter experts and instructional designers for courses on computer science were interviewed. In a computer assisted thematic analysis found codes and keywords was grouped together to create themes. Four themes or problematic areas were found, and that they combined could give an explanation to what teachers experience as problems when implementing blended learning environments. First theme is documentation and support, where teachers find the scarcity of documentation in their virtual learning environment a problem for implementing extension modules. Second theme is introduction and training, where teachers find it problematic that they rarely get a proper introduction or further training on the use of tools and modules. Third theme is the time aspect, teachers suffer from the lack of time to implement blended learning thoroughly in their courses. Last found theme is didactics, where teachers do not feel that they have the required knowledge or skills to apply the appropriate instructional design for blended learning environments.

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Current Practices, Trends and Challenges in K-12 Online Learning

Abstract

Online learning is one of the fastest growing trends in Technology- Enhanced Learning (TEL). Technology in combination with an instruction that addresses the cognitive and social processes of knowledge construction could offer more diverse and effective online learning opportunities than their face-to-face counterparts. In this review we attempt to summarize different forms and practices in K-12 online and blended learning as they appear in various regional, national and cultural contexts. The article starts with introducing some basic concepts and terminology, sums up the state of K-12 online learning around the world and ends with summarizing some trends and challenges observed in current K-12 online learning practices.

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The Role of Feedback in Intelligent Tutoring System

Abstract

Improvement of IT technologies, expansion of internet and popularization of web technologies have enabled technology enhanced learning introduction in adaption of general matters and acquaintance of specialized problems. It is necessary to integrate in ITS (Intelligent Tutoring System) analysis mechanisms and reactions to simulate or overcome natural tutoring environment achievements. In the development of learning systems it is necessary to take into account both individual needs and requirements, as well as the resources of information technologies. Feedback should be aligned, as much as possible, to the learner’s individuality, special needs, self-evaluation, self-explanation, self-regulation, etc.

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A preliminary Exploration of Operating Models of Second Cycle/Research Led Open Education Involving Industry Collaboration

Abstract

Scientists from five Swedish universities were interviewed about open second cycle education. Research groups and scientists collaborate closely with industry, and the selection of scientists for the study was made in relation to an interest in developing technology-enhanced open education, indicated by applications for funding from the Knowledge Foundation 2013. The study is founded on Conole’s (2012) seven organizational purposes for open education, Coursera’s eight models (Daniel, 2012), and Clarke’s (2013) four strategies for open education, and raises the question whether open education and MOOCs might be a way to reinforce research collaborations and research environments. The researchers displayed a positive attitude towards expanding the technology-enhanced learning and openness, and foresee few problems with openness when industry participates in teaching. Nonetheless, the scientists’ operating models and strategies for developing technology-enhanced learning and open education, are vague. Conclusively: although the interest is obvious, in order to succeed with technology-enhanced open education and strengthening the research groups, the variables for purposes, operating models, strategies, pedagogic models, and obstacles need to be calibrated and made more deliberated, preferably in collaboration between the scientists and industry.

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