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Abstract

Cyril of Alexandria was a prolific biblical commentator who underscored the meaning and relevance of the Old Testament for Christian theology by employing a typological method of interpretation. His exegetical concern was to demonstrate that everything associated with the old covenant- people, events, commandments, institutions-were types and shadows foretelling the ‘mystery of Christ’. The key to understanding the types of the Old Testament is to recognize their soteriological fulfillment in the person and work of Jesus Christ. Throughout his exegetical writings, Cyril draws particular attention to the Jewish rite of circumcision, showing how the physical operation signifies the saving work of Christ through the Spirit. Cyril does not interpret circumcision in a monolithic sense, but derives multiple soteriological meanings from it. Insofar as circumcision represents a variety of saving realities for Cyril, it helps us understand his complex, multi-faceted doctrine of salvation.

(1998) Marriage and Desire. In Teske RJ (trans) Answer to the Pelagians, II: Marriage and Desire, Answer to the Two Letters of the Pelagians, Answer to Julian . Hyde Park, NY: New City Press. Backus I and Goudriaan A (2014) ‘Semipelagianism’: The Origins of the Term and its Passage into the History of Heresy. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History 65: 25–46. Ballor JJ, Gaetano MT, and Sytsma DS (eds) (2019a) Beyond Dordt and De Auxiliis: The Dynamics of Protestant and Catholic Soteriology in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries . Leiden: Brill. Ballor JJ

Summary

Many New Testament texts bear witness to the faith of the first Christians in the saving power of the name “Jesus”. This faith is related to the Old Testament significance of giving the names of things and of persons by God: calling with names corresponds closely to God’s role as Creator in relationship to His creative works and to His position as Savior of His people. This double function of naming and calling is pointed out in the Biblical texts on the grammatical and lexical level. The using the name “Jesus” by the New Testament authors and, first of all, by the Synoptics emphasizes a soteriological meaning of the texts.

Abstract

The article concerns a few soteriological threads of alienation criticism of religion whose feature is the creation of a new autonomous and transgressive subject. It focused on the presentation of this subject using Nietzsche’s philosophy perceived within Freudian perspective.

Abstract

Patristic scholars have commented on the early church’s common practice of drawing catechetical instructions from the creation account in Genesis. One of the recurring motifs in such discussions is the fathers’ use of the Adam-Christ typology with its soteriological and sacramental implications. The present study briefly explores this theme in John Chrysostom and Cyril of Alexandria with particular reference to the baptism of Jesus and the theological challenge it posed to the early church: Did Jesus the Lord receive the Spirit at his baptism? Why did he need to be baptized? What is the relationship between the baptism of Jesus and Christian baptism? Both Cyril and Chrysostom make insightful use of the Adamic typology in this context as they discuss how Christ’s work restores fallen humanity from corruption and death that followed Adam’s sin. First, the study examines how the aforementioned fathers from two distinct traditions view the baptism of Jesus in the recovery of God’s grace that was lost in Adam’s fall. Second, the study will demonstrate that both Chrysostom and Cyril had much in common in their understanding of the transforming grace and work of the Spirit in refashioning the believer into a new creation at baptism. And third, it will be shown that there was a consensus on soteriological and sacramental perspectives among the Alexandrians and the Antiochenes.

Summary

The theological dimension of the name of Jesus is not only a domain of biblical teaching, patrology, theology of spirituality or theology of liturgy. It is also a field for reflection of systematic theology. This study starts with a brief theological analysis of the name of Jesus and states that this is a summary of His earthy mission which is a saving mission to man and the world. Karl Rahner’s contribution to contemporary christological reflection is hard to overestimate. His so-called transcendental christology is an attempt to include anthropology into the structure of theology as its integral component. In contrast, narrative theology deals with modern man as the addressee of the Christian message about salvation. It develops particular ways of access by a man, who is not a believer, to the Person and work of Jesus of Nazareth as the true and living Son of God.

edn, 1985. using Reformed christological categories in his research supervised by Karl Barth. He asks pressing questions about how Wesleyan theology can resolve apparent tensions between Christ and the law, and how it can better express the wholeness of Christ to move beyond individual soteriology towards a more comprehensive vision of ecclesial wholeness and the wholeness of the human community. Despite its age, this remains the fullest and most penetrating discussion of Wesley's Christology, and demands attention from all who approach the topic. Wesleyan

(ed) Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp.187-208. Garcia MA (2004) Life in Christ: The Function of Union with Christ in the Unio-Duplex Gratia Structure of Calvin’s Soteriology with Special Reference to the Relationship of Justification and Sanctification in Sixteenth-Century Context . PhD Thesis. University of Edinburgh, U.K. Gavrilyuk PL (2009) The Retrieval of Deification: How a Once-Despised Archaism Became an Ecumenical Desideratum. Modern Theology 25(4): 647-659. Hallonsten G (2007) Theōsis in Recent Research. In