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The Importance of Supplier Evaluation in Short Supply Chains

-supplier relationship, RAUSP Management Journal, 53(4), Sao Paulo, p.598. Ilbery, B., Maye, D. (2005) Alternative (shorter) food supplychains and specialist livestock productsin the Scottish-English borders, Environment and Planning, 37, pp. 823-844. Jarzebowski, S., Pietrzyck, K. (2017) The concept of short supply chains in the food economy, The Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union- the present and the future, Institute of Agricultural and Food Economics National Research Institute, p.197-198. Jin, S., Vidyaranya, B.G. (2016) Supplier selection in small

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Reversible Supply Chain in function of competitiveness

Abstract

Supply Chain makes the flow of goods, services and information from suppliers, through transport, producers, distributors, retailers to end customers. Big producers opt for a strategy of outsourcing logistic services, especially storage, delivery, and distribution services to end-customers. Commitment to the strategy of outsourcing, at the same time, is the strategy of focus on the core business. Small producers, especially manufacturers of agricultural food products, have recently opted to avoid intermediaries in the transport and distribution of the product to the end customer. All in order to increase the quality of their own products and increase the competitiveness by eliminating the costs of intermediaries in transport and distribution. This is achieved by merging and shortening the supply chain. The EU has established an institutional framework regulating the operations of producers through a short supply chain. The market situation requires further optimization by producers due to lack of labour and the need to increase competitiveness and leads to the emergence of a reversible supply chain phenomenon. In the paper, the author, by applying general and special scientific methods of cognition, explores the advantages and shortcomings of the short and reversible supply chain, derived from the traditional and modern supply chain model.

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Evaluation of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Operating in Short Supply Chains Within Slovak School Programmes

. Agriculture and sustainability of the welfare: the role of the short supply chain. In Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia, vol. 8. 2016, pp. 461–466. GALLI, F. – BRUNORI, G. (eds.) 2013. Short Food Supply Chains as drivers of sustainable development. Evidence Document. Document developed in the framework of the FP7 project FOODLINKS (GA No. 265287). Laboratorio di studi rurali Sismondi, ISBN 978-88-90896-01-9. GRALTON, A. – VANCLAY, F. 2009. Artisanality and culture in innovative regional agri-food development: lessons from the Tasmanian artisanal food

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University knowledge exchange and the SKIN Project

Abstract

In this article, we present a rationale for investigating the role and contributions of universities to growth and sustainable development within the framework of the Europe 2020 Strategy (EU2020). To this extent, the literature suggests that the contemporary universities’ mission in the knowledge society relies on their capacity to promote knowledge exchange. This allows expansion of the degree of intervention of universities in society and broadening of the institutional and policy frameworks within which they operate, opening to a wider range of possible contributions of social science and humanities to the EU2020 objectives, which are not limited to education and research policies.

We present the Short supply chain Knowledge and Innovation Network (SKIN) project (H2020-2016)1 as an example of a systemic approach to university-business-society dialogue, based on the role of universities as “knowledge hubs” (Yusuf, 2008) and aimed at promoting knowledge exchange and multi-actor cooperation. One of the main challenges of the project relies on the capacities of the involved actors to cooperate and, thus, on the mechanisms activated in order to ensure such collaboration. To this extent, the role of humanities and social sciences, in particular multidisciplinary and participatory research, is crucial for the success of the process of knowledge circulation within and for society.

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Farmers’ Markets as a Business Model Encouraging Sustainable Production and Consumption

Abstract

The current study discusses the role and the importance of alternative food networks, farmers’ markets in particular, for sustainable rural development through the example of Bulgaria. Farmers’ markets are considered as a sustainable business model of networking which encourages production and consumption of local food of healthy origin adhering to high standards for quality and safety, building society and trust and encouraging development of rural regions. The case of Bulgaria is scrutinized in the context of the support for local food and short supply chains anticipated under the national rural development programme for the period 2014–2020 and the current state-of-art and capacities of available farmers’ markets. Some good practices are analyzed and presented establishing a new type of relationships between producers and consumers of farm products proving that farmers’ markets could be efficient incubators of local businesses and new relationships with end-users. Conclusions are made on nature, objectives and functioning of farmers’ markets, challenges and problems in their promotion, support and encouragement.

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Accessibility of Local Food Production to Regional Markets – Case of Berry Production in Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland

Abstract

Consumers and institutional kitchens, as well as traders, have shown increasing interest towards local food. This is particularly due to the transparency and traceability characteristic of a short supply chain and social aspects related to food origins. The trend has been increasingly common during the past decade in Europe and North America, and it is strongly evident in the case area of this study in Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland. In general, ease of access to food is highly important for consumers and crucial for institutional kitchens, in addition to quality aspects and price. However, regardless of proximity, poor accessibility is one of the key issues preventing the further growth of local food markets. Due to scale economics in food value chain, food transport is presently organised mainly by centralised, large-scale logistics companies directed via hubs serving millions of consumers. Accordingly, production volumes required to enter large-scale markets are often unattainable for disjointed small-scale local food producers. In this study, geographic information system (GIS)-based accessibility analyses are applied for analysing potential for integral networking of local food production and transport companies. Berry production was selected as a case study because it has a relatively strong role in Northern Ostrobothnia, while its logistics are notably underdeveloped. Spatial data of primary production volumes consists of register records of farm-specific cultivation areas and average yields in Northern Ostrobothnia and Finland. Accessibility computations are based on the digital model of the Finnish road network, Digiroad. Two surveys were also implemented to farmers and food processing companies to seek views on food processing, sales, logistics and procurements regarding local food. Data from the surveys was used in accessibility analysis, which enables exploration of opportunities for establishing ‘local food’ clusters integrating small producers into a more effective and competitive network. Information about favourable conditions for cooperative networks in the local food sector may help in establishing companies and their growth. Again, successful networking may increase scale economies in local production in transport, processing and marketing.

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Quo vadis Farmer Sales? The Experience of a Survey in Hungary

tapasztalatok alapján. [The effects of short supply chains. A summary based on the international literature and on domestic experiences] MTA Közgazdaság – és Regionális Tudományi Kutatóközpont Közgazdaság-tudományi Intézet. Műhelytanulmányok , MT-DP – 2014/8, Budapest. Benedek, Zs., & Bálint, B. (2014). A rövid ellátási láncok szocioökonómiai hatásai. [The socio-economic effects of short supply chains] Külgazdaság, 58 (5-6), 100-120. Benedek, Zs., & Bálint, B. (2016). Current status and future prospect of local food production in Hungary: a spatial analysis

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Territorialisation dynamics for Italian farms adhering to Alternative Food Networks

References Aguglia, L., 2009: La filiera corta: una opportunità per agricoltori e consumatori (The short supply chain: an opportunity for farmers and consumers - in Italian). In: Agriregionieuropa, Vol. 5(17), pp. 16-20. Available at: https://agriregionieuropa.univpm.it/it, DoA: 10.10.2017. Akimowicz, M., Cummings, H. and Landman K., 2016: Green lights in the Greenbelt? A qualitative analysis of farm investment decision-making in peri-urban Southern Ontario. In: Land Use Policy, Vol. 55, pp. 24-36. DOI: 10.1016/j

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Women as Drivers for a Sustainable and Social Inclusive Development in Mountain Regions – The Case of the Austrian Alps

Development in Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe. From Rio 1992 to Rio 2012 and beyond. Rome: Mountain Partnership. [11] Hurni, H., Molden, D., Wymann von Dach, S. & Zimmermann, A. B. (2014). Focus Issue: Family Farming in Mountains - Institutional and Organisational Arrangements in the Context of Globalization. Mountain Research and Development 34(4), 313-314. DOI: 10.1659/mrd.3404. [12] Kupiec-Teahana, B., Lamprinopoulou-Kranisa, C., Inglisb, C., Leata, P. & Revoredo-Gihaa, C. (2010). Short supply chains for local food in mountain

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The geography of urban agriculture: New trends and challenges

. Ottawa, International Development Research Centre. MUFPA (2015): Milan Urban Food Policy Pact. [cit. 05.09.2016]. Available at: http://www.milanurbanfoodpolicypact.org/ MUNDLER, P., LAUGHREA, S. (2016): The contribution of short supply chains to territorial development: A study of three Quebec territories. Journal of Rural Studies, 45: 218–229. NAPAWAN, N. C., BURKE, E. (2016): Productive potential: evaluating residential urban agriculture. Landscape Research, 41(7): 773–779. NEHLS, T., JIANG, Y., DENNEHY, C, ZHAN, X., BEESLEY, L. (2015): From

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