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References Bevington, David (Ed.). 2006. Richard III, Shakespeare’s Histories. Pearson Longman. Britten, Nick and Hough, Andrew. 2013. “Richard III: skeleton is the king.” The Telegraph, 4 February 2013. Connor, Steve. 2013. “DNA TESTS prove skeleton found in Leicestershire car park really is King Richard III.” The Independent, 4 February 2013. Cunningham, Sean. 2003. Richard III: A Royal Enigma. London: The National Archives. Darnton, Robert. 2000. Marele masacru al pisicii și alte episoade din istoria culturală a Franței. Iași: Polirom. Eldridge Carney, Jo

, Julia M. (Eds.). 2010. Reading the Nation in English Literature . London and New York: Routledge. Tennenhouse, Leonard. 1996. “Strategies of State and political plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VIII” in Political Shakespeare. Essays in Cultural Materialism . Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield (Eds.). Manchester: Manchester University Press. Wegemer, Gerard. 2007. “Thomas More’s History of King Richard III: Educating citizens for self-government”. Thomas More Studies 2:38-48

, Julia M. (Eds.). 2010. Reading the Nation in English Literature . London and New York: Routledge. Tennenhouse, Leonard. 1996. “Strategies of State and political plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VIII” in Political Shakespeare. Essays in Cultural Materialism . Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield (Eds.). Manchester: Manchester University Press. Wegemer, Gerard. 2007. “Thomas More’s History of King Richard III: Educating citizens for self-government”. Thomas More Studies 2:38-48.

, 1996. Pinter, Harold. Various Voices . London: Faber and Faber, 1999. Postman, Neil. The Disappearance of Childhood . London:Vintage/Random House, 1994 (1982). Shakespeare, William. King John . Hertforshire: Wordsworth Classics, 1996. Shakespeare, William. Richard III . New York: The Pelican Shakespeare, Penguin Books. 1984 (1959). Shakespeare, William. Macbeth . New York: Folger Library, 1973 (1959). Trevelyan, G.M.A. Shortened History of England . London: Penguin Books, 1987.

.V., Woosnam-Savage R.C., Morgan B., Brough A., Earp R.W., Robinson C., King T.E., Morris M., Buckley R., Perimortem trauma in King Richard III: a skeletal analysis, The Lancet, 2015, 385, 253-259 [11] McGuire B.P., Conflict and Continuity at Øm Abbey. A Cistercian Experience in Medieval Denmark, Museum Tusculanum, Copenhagen, 1976 [12] Olrik J., Isager J., Garner H.N. (trans.), Øm klosters krønike, Scriptorium, Øm Kloster Museum, Skanderborg, 1997 [13] Garner H.N., Øm kloster museum, Scriptorium (Ry Bogtryk, Rex), Ry, 1998 [14] Mollerup L., Begravelser ved Øm Kloster, In

author worked herslef, the opinions and balance that do not dilute the asperities of an intrinsic dispute. So, all people interested in modern Romanian performance (but not only) are provided with a useful paper, the result of the author’s own reading of this phenomenon supported by solid analyses of performances selected for this research. The author focused on the soliloquy, used to create a corpus of reference texts (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard III, Hamlet, King Lear, Twelfth Night) integrated into a permanent hermeneutic circuit going towards and

ones. The entry of the sprite Puck is carried out through a recitative monologue: Puck: Thou speak’st aright; I am that merry wanderer of the night. I jest to Oberon, and make him smile, When I a fat and bean-fed horse beguile, Neighing in likeness of a filly foal: And sometimes lurk I in a gossip’s bowl, In very likeness of a roasted crab […] This type of monologue can also cover descriptions of other characters or auto-characterizations, an example being the monologue of Richard III from the first act, scene 1: But, I, that am not shaped for sportive

: Royal badges . Woodbridge: Boydell Press. Siddons, M. P. (2009c). Heraldic badges in England and Wales: Volume II, part 2: Non-royal badges . Woodbridge: Boydell Press. Siddons, M. P. (2009d). Heraldic badges in England and Wales. Volume III: Ordinaries . Woodbridge: Boydell Press. Sutton, A. F., & Visser-Fuchs, L. (1992). Richard III’s books: Ancestry and ‘true nobility’. Ricardian , 119 (9), 343–358. Touw, M. (1982) Roses in the Middle Ages. Economic Botany , 36 (1), 71–83. Tseronis, A., & Forceville, C. (2009). Introduction. In A. Tseronis & C. Forceville

, in a certain way, the unity of being. (Omescu, 1999, p. 58) In fact – returning to a question that we were trying to elucidate – how does theory reflect in the stage practice? Was the director helped by the essayist? How did Omescu take over his hermeneutical “diaries”? The Shakespeare recital performed at the National Theatre in Iași was a successful one. The poet Emil Brumaru recalls this event, not without a wave of nostalgia: I was fortunate enough to see the scene of the steep conquest by Richard III, the crazy and ugly, of Lady Anne mourning after

possible. Are we talking only about those “character roles” mentioned by Stanislavsky? This reference can be considered since all those character roles require stage composition, the way Stanislavsky described his own acting experiences. But is this the only landmark? Should we label as composition roles only the characters that demand text-triggered stage composition? Indeed, there are characters that assume, within their construction, elements that do not belong to the actor as an individual. For example, they have various physical (Richard III) or mental (King