Search Results

1 - 10 of 529 items :

  • "Reception" x
Clear All
Authenticity, Reception and Media Reality

(O)D. A philosophical deconstruction and narratological revitalization of the eschatological metaphor in marketing. In Brown, Stephen. - Bell, Jim. - Carson, David. (1996). Marketing Apocalypse: Eschatology, Escapology and the Illusion of the End. London, Routledge, p. 111-132. ISBN 9780415148221 Holub, Robert C. (1984). Reception Theory. A Critical Introduction. New York: Methuen. Kosmály, Peter. (2011). Multisensory Environment and Sensory Deprivation in the Treatment of Reception Defects. In Creative and

Open access
The reception of antiquity in nineteenth-century British literature – an attempt at theoretical synthesis

References Batstone, W. W. (2006). “Provocation. The Point of Reception Theory”. Classics and the Uses of Reception , edited by Charles Martindale and Richard F. Thomas, Blackwell Publishing, pp. 14-20. Bowen, J. (1989). “Education, Ideology and the ruling class: Hellenism and English Public Schools in the Nineteenth Century”. Rediscovering Hellenism. The Hellenic Inheritance and the English Imagination , edited by G. W. Clarke, Cambridge University Press, pp. 161-186. Challis, D. (1989). “The Ablest Race. The Ancient Greeks in Victorian

Open access
Critical Reception of William Faulkner’s
The Sound and the Fury in America and in Romania

Press. Fargnoli, A. N.–Golay M.–Hamblin W. R. (eds). 2008. William Faulkner: a literary reference to his life and work . New York: Facts on File, Inc. Fish, S. 1980. Is there a text in this class? The authority of interpretive communities. Cambridge–Mass.: Harvard University Press. Goci, A. 1971. W. Faulkner: Zgomotul şi furia. Recenzie. Amfiteatru 6(5): 2. Inge, M. Th. (ed.). 1995. William Faulkner: the contemporary reviews . Cambridge University Press. Jauss, H. R. 1982. Toward an aesthetic of reception . Minneapolis: University

Open access
Multisensory Environment and Sensory Deprivation in the Treatment of Reception Defects

HIDDEN GO(O)D. A philosophical deconstruction and narratological revitalization of the eschatological metaphor in marketing. In BROWN, S. - BELL, J. Marketing Apocalypse: Eschatology, Escapology and the Illusion of the End. London: Routledge, p. 111-132. HOLUB, R. (1984) Reception Theory. A Critical Introduction. New York: Methuen, 185 p. ISBN 0-416-33580-2 HUTCHISON, M. (1984) The book of Floating - Exploring the private sea. New York: QUILL. ISBN 0-688-04826-9. FEYERABEND, Paul. (1993

Open access
Approximation of Measurement Results of “Emergency” Signal Reception Probability

Abstract

The intended aim of this article is to present approximation results of the exemplary measurements of EMERGENCY signal reception probability. The probability is under-stood as a distance function between the aircraft and a ground-based system under established conditions. The measurements were approximated using the properties of logistic functions. This probability, as a distance function, enables to determine the range of the EMERGENCY signal for a pre-set confidence level.

Open access
The Ecclesiological Relevance of Reception

Abstract

From the perspective of a theory of communication the church is a community of reception [of messages] relevant for salvation (conf. Hebr. 1, 1 sq.; 2, 1; 1 Cor. 15, 1-39). It has to consciously undertake the apostolic message as its addressee in the actuality of its own existence. This primarily takes place through the instances of faith testimonies (Scriptures, Tradition, Magisterium, Theology, and Sense of Faith), among which the sensus fidelium is given particular importance: the experience of all Christians must be incorporated in the shared belief so that it can truly be faith of the church. The consequences that entail can be canvassed through examples from cannon law, the theology for the magisterium and, most of all, from ecumenism.

Open access
The Strategy of “Controlled Reception” in Witold Lutosławski’s Commentaries on his own Works

Abstract

Witold Lutosławski’s commentaries on his own music are often defective in many regards. These defects could be explained as resulting from a strategy according to which the aim of a commentary is not to provide a truthful description of musical phenomena but to form a desired image of a composition or a musical style in the minds of the listeners. This idea of ‘controlled reception’ was clearly outlined by the famous Polish writer Witold Gombrowicz (whose writings Lutosławski knew and highly appreciated) and is especially noticeable in the composer’s remarks on “controlled aleatoricism”, “thin textures” and the connections between his music and the twelve-tone technique. The view of reception of art common to Gombrowicz and Lutosławski could be characterised in the writer’s own words: A style that cannot defend itself before human judgment, that surrenders its creator to the ill will of any old imbecile, does not fulfil its most important assignment. [...] the idiot’s opinion is also significant. It also creates us, shapes us from inside out, and has far-reaching practical and vital consequences. [...] Literature [art in general - note by M.K.] has a dual significance and a dual root: it is born of pure artistic contemplation [...], but it is also an author’s personal settling of accounts with people, an instrument in the battle waged for a spiritual existence.

Open access
Fragments of Europeanization of Georgian Property Law and Law of Obligations in the Context of Reception of German Law

International Commercial Law , University of Virginia School of Law, Legal Studies, Working Paper, no. 99-10. Putkaradze, I. (2001), ‘Gratuitous contracts in Georgian law,’ [in Georgian] Georgian Law Review , no. 2, pp. 17–25. Riesenfeld, S. (1993), ‘The impact of German legal ideas and institutions on legal thought and institutions in the United States,’ in M. Reimann (ed.) The Reception of Continental Ideas in the Common Law World 1820–1920 , vol. 13, Berlin: Suncker & Humbolt, Berlin, pp. 89–98. Ripstein, A. (2009), Force and Freedom: Kant’s Legal

Open access
The Reception of Galician Performances and (Re)translations of Shakespeare

Abstract

This presentation will deal with the reception of performances, translations and retranslations of Shakespeare’s plays into the Galician language. As is well-known, Galician is a Romance language which historically shared a common origin with Portuguese in the Iberian Peninsula, and which had a different evolution due to political reasons, i.e. the independence of Portugal and the recentralization of Spain after a long partition with the so called Catholic monarchs. As a consequence, Galician ceased to be the language of power and culture as it was during the Middle Ages, and was spoken by peasants and the lower classes in private contexts for centuries. With the disappearance of Francoism in the 1970s, the revival of Galician and its use as a language of culture was felt as a key issue by the Galician intelligentsia and by the new autonomous government formed in 1981. In order to increase the number of speakers of the language and to give it cultural respectability, translations and performances of prominent playwrights, and particularly those by Shakespeare were considered instrumental. This article will analyse the use of Shakespeare’s plays as an instrument of gentrification of the Galician language, so that the association with Shakespeare would confer a marginalized language social respectability and prestige.

Open access
Canons and Heroes: The Reception of the Complete Works Translation Project in Finland, 2002-13

Abstract

This essay examines the reception of the ten-year Complete Works translation project undertaken by the Finnish publishing company Werner Söderström Oy (WSOY) in 2004-13. Focusing on reviews published in the first and last years of the project, the essay details ongoing processes of Shakespeare (re-)canonization in Finland, as each new generation explains to itself what Shakespeare means to them, and why it continues to read, translate and perform Shakespeare. These processes are visible in comments from the series editors and translators extolling the importance of Shakespeare’s work and the necessity of creating new, modern translations so Finns can read Shakespeare in their mother tongue; in discussions of the literary qualities of a good Shakespeare translation, e.g. whether it is advisable to use iambic pentameter in Finnish, a trochaic language; and in the creation of publisher and translator “heroes,” who at significant cost to themselves, whether in money in terms of the publisher, or time and effort in terms of the translators, labour to provide the public with their Shakespeare in modern Finnish. While on the whole reviewers celebrated the new translations, there was some resistance to changes in familiar lines from older translations, such as Macbeth’s “tomorrow” speech, suggesting that there are nevertheless some limits on modernizing “classic” translations.

Open access