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Changes in demand for children between 2003 and 2013 in Nigeria: Evidence from survey data

Abstract

Nigeria has one of the highest fertility rates in Africa. Data from 2013 Demographic and Health Surveys indicate a virtual stagnation of fertility rate since 2003. Low contraceptive use and pronatalist attitudes are among the factors contributing to the high fertility rate in Nigeria. In this manuscript, we pooled data from three most recent waves of Demographic and Health Surveys to examine trends in demand for children over time and identify the factors associated with change in demand for children. The data show that demand for children has declined since 2003 although not monotonically so. Variables that were positively associated with increased likelihood of desiring no additional children were residence in the South-West (as opposed to residence in the North-Central), exposure to family planning (FP) messages on the mass media, number of children ever born, educational level, and urban residence. In contrast, uncertainty about fertility desire was more widespread in 2008 compared to 2013 although less widespread in 2003 than in 2013. The likelihood of being undecided about fertility desire was positively associated with discrepancies in family size desires between husband and wife, parity and Islamic religious affiliation. Programs should aim to increase access to effective contraceptive methods and promote demand for contraceptives as a way of fostering a sustainable reduction in demand for children. Furthermore, strategies that address uncertainty by fostering women’s understanding of the social and health implications of large family sizes are relevant.

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Towards Pronatalism – Baltic Family Policy in European Comparison in 2002 and 2010

Abstract

The majority of comparative analyses of family policy have been oriented towards western European countries and only very few have included Baltic and eastern European countries. The aim of this paper is to analyse family policy in Baltic countries in European comparison about ten years after regaining independence, in 2002, and in 2010. Family policy is divided into two categories for analysis: 1) support for families from around the birth of a child until the first birthday of the child, pronatalist policies; and 2) child well-being policies, support for the family when the child is older. All policy data are standardised according to the relative wealth in the particular country. Results demonstrate that after ten years of country specific family policy processes, Lithuania developed a very specific pronatalist family policy type compared with Estonia and Latvia. In 2010, Estonia and Latvia also obtained a more pronatalist approach, but the Baltic countries did not belong to any one particular crystallised family policy group.

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Mobilizing for Global AIDS Treatment
Clicking Compassion and Shopping Salvation

. (2002) Globalizing AIDS . Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press. Richey, L.A. (2011) Anti-Viral but Pro-Natal? ARVs and Reproductive Health: The View from a South African Township. In C. Browner, & C. Sargent, Reproduction, Globalization and the State. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Richey, L.A. and S. Ponte (2011) Brand Aid: Shopping Well to Save the World. Minneapolis and London: Univ. of Minnesota Press. Robins, S. (2006) From ‘Rights’ to ‘Ritual’: AIDS Activism in South Africa. American

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