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Sketch on Paul Ricoeur’s life and writings

Bibliografie: Dosse, Franci, Paul Ricoeur : Les sens d’ une vie, Edition La Decouverte, Paris XIII, 1977 Mounier, Emmanuel, Le Personalisme , P.U.F., Paris, 1949 Arendt, Hannah, Vies Politiques , Ediția Gallimard, Paris, 1974 Ricoeur, Paul, Soi meme comme un autre , Edition du Seuil, Paris, 1990 Teodor, Vidam, Eseuri etice , Ed. Argonaut, Cluj-Napoca, 2018

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“Eyes wide shut”: Paul Ricoeur’s Biblical Hermeneutics and the Course of Recognition in John Milton’s Paradise Lost

: Wydawnictwo Literackie, 1984. 134-35. Print. Fish, Stanley. Surprised by Sin: The Reader in Paradise Lost. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1988. Print. Greisch, Jean. “Toward Which Recognition?” A Passion for the Possible: Thinking with Paul Ricoeur. Ed. Brian Treanor and Henry Isaac Venema. New York: Fordham, 2010. 90-112. Print. Hanson, Jeffrey. “Kierkegaard’s Narratives in Service of Being Educated by Possibility.” Unpublished paper delivered at the Annual Kierkegaard Conference, Copenhagen 2010 (18-20 Aug. 2010): Being and

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The question of Fiction – nonexistent objects, a possible world response from Paul Ricoeur

Abstract

The question of fiction is omnipresent within the work of Paul Ricoeur throughout his prolific career. However, Ricoeur raises the questions of fiction in relation to other issues such the symbol, metaphor and narrative. This article sets out to foreground a traditional problem of fiction and logic, which is termed the existence of non-existent objects, in relation to the Paul Ricoeur’s work on narrative. Ricoeur’s understanding of fiction takes place within his overall philosophical anthropology where the fictions and histories make up the very nature of identity both personal and collective. The existence of non-existent objects demonstrates a dichotomy between fiction and history, non-existent objects can exist as fictional objects. The very possibility of the existence of fictional objects entails ontological status considerations. What ontological status do fictional objects have? Ricoeur develops a concept of narrative configuration which is akin to the Kantian productive imagination and configuration frames the question historical narrative and fictional narrative. It is demonstrated that the ontological status of fictional objects can be best understood in a model of possible worlds.

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Identity and War in Michael Ondaatje’s
The English Patient

References Aravamudan, Srinivas. “Introduction: Perpetual War.” PMLA vol. 124, Number 5, October 2009. Dauenhauer, Bernard and David Pellauer. “Paul Ricoeur.” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2011 Edition), Ed. Edward N. Zalta. <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2011/entries/ricoeur/>. Lacoste, Jean-Yves. Timpul - o fenomenologie teologică . Trans. Maria-Cornelia Ică jr. Sibiu: Deisis, 2005. Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient . London: Bloomsbury, 1992

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Reading The Road with Paul Ricoeur and Julia Kristeva: The Human Body as a Sacred Connection

Abstract

Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road confronts readers with a question: what is there to live towards after apocalypse? McCarthy locates his protagonists in the aftermath of the world’s fiery destruction, dramatizing a relationship between a father and a son, who are, as McCarthy puts it, “carrying the fire.” This essay asserts that the body carrying the fire is a sacred, incandescent body that connects to and with the world and the other, unifying the human and the divine. This essay will consider the body as a sacred connection in The Road. Paul Ricoeur’s hermeneutics and Julia Kristeva’s psychoanalytic approach will help to explore what is sacred. In addition, their works elucidate the body as a present site of human connection and sacredness while calling attention to what is glaringly absent yet hauntingly present in McCarthy’s text: the mother. In the aftermath of destruction, primitive, sacred connections become available through the sensual body, highlighting what is at stake in the novel: the connection of body and spirit. The essay will attempt to show that McCarthy’s rejection of a redemptive framework, or hope in an otherworldly reality, shrouds spirit in physicality symbolized by the fire carried by the body. This spirit offers another kind of hope, one based on the body’s potential to feel and connect to the other. The thought and works of Ricoeur and Kristeva will broaden a reading of McCarthy’s novel, especially as a statement about the unification of body and spirit, contributing a multidimensional view of a contemporary problem regarding what sustains life after a cataclysmic event.

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How to Respond to Conflicts Over Value Pluralism?

patchy; in particular, it will be confined to a discussion of some ideas of Charles Taylor and Paul Ricoeur about this issue. Furthermore, rather than discussing the political consequences of value pluralism, in particular the problem to what extent the democratic, liberal state should recognize by law-specific group rights, See e.g. many of the comments on Taylor’s provocative paper on the politics of recognition ( Rockefeller 1994 , 87-98; Walzer 1994 , 99-103; Habermas 1994 , 107-148). this section focuses on the attitudes or virtues that are needed to respond to

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“When China Meets China”: Sinéad Morrissey’s Figurations of the Orient, or the Function of Alterity in Julia Kristeva and Paul Ricoeur

Abstract

This article attempts to investigate the potential resonances between Paul Ricoeur’s and Julia Kristeva’s theories of otherness as applied to the study of poetry by the Northern-Irish poet Sinéad Morrissey. In all of her five poetry books she explores various forms of otherness and attempts to sketch them in verse. She confronts alterity in many ways, approaching such subjects as the relationship with the body and children, encounters with foreigners, and coming to terms with what is foreign within us. This article engages primarily with her experiences of China, which she recorded in the long poem “China” from her third collection, The State of Prisons (2005). Firstly, this article tackles the question of the body, which is interpreted on the basis of Morrissey’s “post-mortem” poems. Their reading prepares the ground for further explorations of otherness, which Morrissey locates at the very heart of human subjectivity. In this way, she also manages to establish a poetic framework for an ethical consideration of otherness. By investigating the working of the human psyche, Morrissey seems to go along the lines of Kristeva and Ricoeur, who claim that otherness is inextricably linked with the formation of human subjectivity. Taking a cue from their philosophical enquiries, the article also attempts to establish where Kristeva’s and Ricoeur’s philosophies overlap.

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To Look at Things as if They Could Be Otherwise: Educating the Imagination

References Anderson Sathe, Laurie. “Female Health Care Professionals: Writing Narratives and Producing Knowledge.” Diss. University of St. Thomas, 2004. Print. Greene, Maxine. Releasing the Imagination. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1995. Print. Kearney, Richard. On Stories. London: Routledge, 2002. Print. ---. “Paul Ricoeur and the Hermeneutic Imagination in the Narrative Path: The Later Works of Paul Ricoeur.” Philosophy & Social Criticism 14.2 (1988): 115-45. Print. ---. The

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Testimony, Responsibility and Recognition: A Ricoeurian Response to Crises of Sexual Abuse

References Associated Press. “Boy Scouts Ordered to Pay Oregon Man Kerry Lewis $18.5M in Sex Abuse Case.” New York Daily News. NYDailyNews.com, 24 Apr. 2010. Web. 30 Apr. 2013. Fricker, Miranda. Epistemic Injustice: Power & the Ethics of Knowing. New York City: Oxford UP, 2007. Print. Greisch, Jean. “Testimony and Attestation.” Paul Ricoeur: The Hermeneutics of Action. Ed. Richard Kearney. London: Sage, 1996. Print. Hamilton, Marci. Justice Denied: What America Must Do to Protect Its Children

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Lost Confidence and Human Capability: A Hermeneutic Phenomenology of the Gendered, yet Capable Subject

References Anderson, Pamela Sue. “Abjection and Defilement: A Pre-linguistic Condition for Reading Ricoeur on Sexual Identity.” At the Boundaries of Thought: Paul Ricoeur and the Philosophy of Religion. Ed. Adam Graves. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, forthcoming. Print. ---. “From Ricoeur to Life: ‘Living Up to Death’ with Spinoza, but also with Deleuze.” From Ricoeur to Action: the Socio-Political Significance of Ricoeur’s Thinking. Ed. Todd S. Mei and David Lewin. London: Continuum, 2012. 19-32. Print

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