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Abstract

To intervene against discriminatory in the workplace is tremendously important because discriminatory practices have an enormous economic impact, along with a severe impact on psychological health, which can result in illnesses such as depression and burnout. Such intervention requires a multidimensional approach, including the whole organization and a systematic procedure. The aim of this paper is to offer suggestions on how to reduce discrimination in the workplace in Austria and Taiwan. To reach this aim, a qualitative study was conducted. It showed that education, active positioning of companies, leadership and diligent selection of employees, discussion and analysis, psychological support, governmental policies, and aspects of language and talking gender-wise are the most important steps to decrease or eliminate discrimination in the workplace.

Abstract

Society since ancient times faced with a weak involvement of human resources in organizations. Therefore motivating employees became today an important objective for organizations that want to remain viable on the market today. Motivation of human resources in the organization will bring extra performance to the manager that hopes to reach the organization's goals.

Abstract

This study of cultures across 6 countries (7 regions) shows that each region has its own specificity and its own unique employee value profile. Value profiles have been explored as a potential diagnostic tool on the basis of Hofstede’s value dimensions in the service of human resource development at the local level. The resulting employee value profiles are based on a representative sample of employees in the private and public sectors. Significant similarity in value profiles have been found for employees from Croatia and Serbia compared to Romania, Hungary, Slovenia and Italy, both in the public and private sector. The research results suggest the direction that managers and policymakers need to take in order to understand what employees’ values are, how they can be used, and how to address the challenges of human resource development in their region.

Abstract

The pedestrian flow equations are formulated as the hyperbolic problem with a source term, completed by the eikonal equation yielding the desired direction of the pedestrian velocity. The operator splitting consisting of successive discretization of the eikonal equation, ordinary differential equation with the right hand side being the source term and the homogeneous hyperbolic system is proposed. The numerical flux of the Vijayasundaram type is proposed for the finite volume solution of the hyperbolic problem. The Vijayasundaram numerical flux, originally proposed for the hyperbolic problems possessing the homogeneity property is extended for pedestrian flow, where the homogeneity property is lost. The application of the proposed numerical flux is demonstrated on the physically relevant problem.

Sainz de Baranda et al., 2008 ). To assess inter- and intra-observer reliability, data were compared across two sessions with a kappa above 0.85. To define the dimensions of the SSGs, the playing area proposed by Casamichana and Castellano (2010) was used. The variables observed in this work are described below. Independent variables Playing area The format of the SSG s are 62 x 44 m for a large pitch (SSG L ) with a playing area of 2728 m 2 and a ratio per player of 272.8 m; 50 x 35 m for a medium pitch (SSG M ) with a playing area of 1750 m 2 and a ratio

Abstract

Species diversity is one of the most important indices used to evaluate the sustainability of forest communities. The sampling method and the number of plots are factors affecting the estimation of plant biodiversity. In the present study, effects of different inventory grids on estimation of tree species diversity were compared in semi-arid forests of Iran. There were selected 50 hectares of these forests representing the regional forests. Sampling procedures were carried out on circular plots (1,000m2) within inventory grids, with dimensions of 50 × 50 m (200 plots), 100 × 50 m (100 plots), 100 × 100 m (50 plots), 200 × 50 m (50 plots), 200 × 100 m (25 plots), and 250 × 200 m (10 plots). For each plot, the type of the species and the number of trees were recorded. Simpson (1-D), Hill (N2), Shannon-Wiener (H), Mc Arthur (N1), Smith-Wilson (Evar) and Margalef (R1) indices were used to estimate the tree species diversity. The inventory grid was evaluated based on the precision and cost criteria (E%2 × T). The obtained sampling error values showed that the inventory grid consisting of 200 plots exhibited more accuracy for estimating the biodiversity indices. But based on the results of E%2 × T, the inventory grid with 25 plots was selected as the most appropriate one for estimating the tree species diversity in semi-arid forests. The results of this study can also serve to estimate the tree species diversity in other semi-arid forests of Iran.

Abstract

Geophysical methods offer a broad spectrum of information by dealing with slope deformations. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method is mainly applied for spatial localization of the landslide body and depicting the shear zone position. This article presents the application of the ERT method for the landslide hazardous areas by means of numerical modelling. Four different synthetic models with very small resistivity contrast (30 Ohm.m/50 Ohm.m), where each model represents a different type of slope deformation, were tested by several factors affecting the final inverse model: measurement point density, L1 and L2 norm and L-norm roughness filter components. The higher measurement points density helps mainly to detect the boundaries at greater depths. Inverse models computed using the L1 norm bring satisfactory results for compact anomalous bodies, i.e. water saturated landslide body. In the case of subtle conductive zones, i.e. shear planes, the L2 norm based inversion is recommended. For enhanced reconstruction of skewed anomalous objects, roughness filter including a diagonal component produces more accurate inverse image. The article also demonstrates the ability of the ERT method to detect and describe the shape of the slope deformation even by a relative subtle resistivity contrast

Abstract

The aim of this study is to figure out possible connectedness between emotional intelligence and five big personality factors in female students selected from social sciences faculties.

The evaluated sample comprised 66 healthy students, of Macedonian nationality, mean age 18.9 ± 0.63 years. As psychometric instruments, we used the EI-test and NEO-PI-R, both with eligible metric characteristic and already used in the Republic of Macedonia. Statistical analysis was performed using Sta17, both descriptive and inferential statistics including medians, standard deviations, and two-tailed Pearson's correlation.

The obtained results for emotional intelligence showedn average anxiety level (M = 77.35), extraversion (M = 50.91) and a realistic outlook on life (M = 81.64), high self-confidence (M = 44.44) and generally satisfactory empathy (M = 85.39). Personality characteristics obtained with NEO-PI-R showed high extroversion (M = 123. 70), low agreeableness (M = 105.82) and consciousness (M = 104.67), as well as mild neuroticism (M = 91.33) and openness (M = 117.45). The results confirmed a high positive correlation between anxiety, optimism, and empathy; and between self-confidence and empathy within the EI test. Within NEO-PR-R there was a positive correlation between factors Extroversion and Openness to Experience and a negative correlation between the factors Extroversion and Agreeableness. However, just one negative correlation is noted, between Extroversion from EI and Openness to experience from NEO-PR-R (-0,25; p < 0.05).

We concluded that similar facets measured with different psychometric instruments have different basic concepts. The obtained results, although they figure out some support from other research, also differ from other studies. It is important for us to follow the obtained results and to provoke further research on a bigger and more diverse sample.

Abstract

Introduction. When evaluating the swimming technique of people with disabilities, a particularly important factor, besides physiological aspects, is the efficiency of the effort expended. This suggests that assessing and monitoring the effectiveness of swimming should be a regular part of training for swimmers with disabilities. Therefore, it seems important to distinguish how changes occur in the parameters that determine the effectiveness of swimming. This is especially true of anaerobic lactic exercise as the lactic acid concentration in the blood increases significantly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of calculating velocity and the stroke index in the swimming training of people with disabilities, along with the progressive fatigue of a high-intensity interval training workout. Material and methods. The sample comprised 12 elite competitors with a disability. The experiment consisted in swimming sequential distances of 48 m, 50 m, 52 m, and 54 m at maximum intensity. Competitors performed four sets of four repetitions with a 75-second interval between repetitions and 15 minutes of active resting between sets. All sets were recorded using five digital cameras with a frequency of 50 frames per second. The recorded material was analysed with the use of motion analysis software, and the stroke index was calculated. Results. There was found to be no significant change in the average swimming velocity during each set and corresponding repetition, which means that the participants were able to tolerate the training intensity. Also, the stroke index did not change to a statistically significant degree in either of the subsequent sets or the subsequent repetitions (p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that analysing the value of the swimming stroke index for people with disabilities can be a diagnostic method for assessing the effectiveness of high-intensity interval training.

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