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Geographic Origins of Invasive Alien Species in “Iron Gates” Natural Park (Banat, Romania)

Netherlands, 133-265. 10. Daleo P., Alberti J. and Iribarne O., 2009 – Biological invasions and the neutral theory, Diversity and Distributions , 15, 547-553. 11. Donaldson J. E., Hui C., Richardson D. M., Robertson M. P., Webber B. L. and Wilson J. R. U., 2014 – Invasion trajectory of alien trees: the role of introduction pathway and planting history, Global Change Biology , 20, 1527-1537. 12. EEA, 2014 – Invasive Alien Species. A European response, EC, Belgium, 5-24. 13. Elton C. S., 1958 – The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants, Methuen

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New Vision on Invasive Alien Plant Management System

R eferences [1] Hulme P. E. Trade, transport and trouble: Managing invasive species pathways in an era of globalization. Journal of Applied Ecology 2009:46(1):10–18. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2664.2008.01600.x [2] Kettunen M., et al. Technical support to EU strategy on invasive alien species (IAS) – Assessment of the impacts of IAS in Europe and the EU. Institute for European Environmental Policy 2008:44. [3] Regulation (EU) No. 1143/2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species. Official Journal of

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Effects of cold winters and roost site stability on population development of non-native Asian ring-necked parakeets (Alexandrinus manillensis) in temperate Central Europe – results of a 16-year census

Abstract

Asian ring-necked parakeets (Alexandrinus manillensis, formerly Psittacula krameri, hereafter RNP) first bred in Germany in 1969. Since then, RNP numbers increased in all three major German subpopulations (Rhineland, Rhine-Main, Rhine-Neckar) over the period 2003-2018. In the Rhine-Neckar region, the population increased to more than fivefold within only 15 years. Interestingly, there was no significant breeding range expansion of RNP in the period 2010-2018. In 2018, the total number of RNP in Germany amounted to >16,200 birds. Differences in RNP censuses between years were evident. Surprisingly, cold winters (extreme value, −13.7 °C) and cold weather conditions in the breeding season (coldest month average, −1.36 °C) were not able to explain between-year variation. This finding suggests that in general winter mortality is low - with exceptions for winters 2008/2009 and 2009/2010, and a population-relevant loss of broods is low in our study population. Surprisingly, the social behaviour in terms of spatio-temporal stability of roost sites could well explain positive and negative population trends. Years of spatially stable and regularly used roost sites seem to correlate with increasing population sizes. In contrast, known shifts of RNP among different roost sites or the formations of new roost sites by split are related to population stagnation or a decrease in numbers. Climate change may lead to further range expansion as cities not suitable yet for RNP may become so in the near future.”

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Recent State and Mechanisms of Invasions of Exotic Decapods in Ukrainian Rivers

Abstract

Lower reaches of largest Ukrainian rivers are zones of migrations for exotic euryhaline decapods. During 2000s new records of invasions of three euryhaline exotic decapods, Rhithropanopeus harrisii (Gould, 1841), Eriocheir sinensis Milne-Edwards, 1853 and Macrobrachium nipponense (De Haan, 1849), were made in the channels of Ukrainian rivers. Chinese mitten crab, E. sinensis, spread in the Danube Delta and reservoirs of the Dnieper River; Rh. harrisii - in the channels of the Danube, Dnieper, Southern Bug and small river Gruzskij Yelanchik in the Azov Sea Basin; M. nipponense that was introduced in the Kuchurgan Liman (cooler reservoir of the Moldavian Hydro-power Station) - in the Dniester Delta. The migration zone of the established population can cover significant part of river watershed; it is necessary to take this fact into account at an estimation of biological invasion risk. Main problem in the investigation of exotic decapods in Ukrainian waters is absence of specialized methods used in the standard ecological monitoring. Among euryhaline exotic decapods, only Rh. harrisii is sometimes sampled with the equipment used in the monitoring of macrozoobenthos. A few records of these species at the large extent of their supposed ways of migration are the result of gaps in the study of their distribution in Ukrainian inland waters. Realistic attitude toward this fact is very important for the estimation of invasions in the inland waters of this region.

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Alien Species of EU Concern in Romania

conditions, HYLA-Herpetološki bilten , 2015, 1, 44-49. 28. European Comission, 2016 – Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/1141 of 13 July 2016 adopting a list of invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Official Journal of the European Union , L 189/4, 14 July 2016. 29. Ficetola G. F., Coïc C., Detaint M., Berroneau M., Lorvelec O. and Miaud C., 2007a – Pattern of distribution of the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana in Europe, Biological Invasions , 9, 767

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Assessment of the Potential of Introduction, Establishment and Further Spread of Invasive Alien Plant Species of European Union Concern in Lithuania

progress: Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx. (Haloragaceae) in Croatia. – Natura Croatica, 26(1): 99–103. J eschke J.M., B acher S., B lackburn T.M., D ick J.T.A., E ssl F., E vans T., G aertner M., H ulme P.E., K ühn I., M rugała A., P ergl J., P yšek P., R abitsch W., R icciardi A., R ichardson D. M., S endek A., V ilà M., W inter M., K umschick S., 2014: Defining the impact of non-native species. – Conservation Biology, 28: 1188–1194. K lingenstein F., 2007: Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheet – Heracleum mantegazzianum . – In: NOBANIS

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Alien Plant Species in the Agricultural Habitats of Ukraine: Diversity and Risk Assessment

–149. McNeely, J.A., Mooney, H.A., Neville, L.E., Schei, P.J. & Waage J.K. (Eds.) (2001). Global strategy on invasive alien species. Switzerland and Cambridge: IUCN, Gland. Mosyakin, S.L. & Fedoronchuk M.M. (1999). Vascular plants of Ukraine: A nomenclatural checklist . Kiev: M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, Missouri Botanic Gardens. Mosyakin, S.L. (2013). Rodyny i porjadky kvitkovyh roslyn flory Ukrainy: pragmatychna klasyfikaciia ta polozhennia u philogenetychnyi systemi. Ukrainian Botanical Journal, 70(3), 289–307. DOI: 10.15407/ukrbotj70

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The occurrence of alien species in the settlement areas of the Kampinos National Park and its vicinity (Central Poland)

., Ferchmin M., Kirpluk I. & Otręba A. 2014b. Inwazyjne gatunki roślin we florze Puszczy Kampinoskiej. In: A. Otręba & D. Michalska-Hej duk (eds.). Inwazyjne gatunki roślin w Kampinoskim Parku Narodowym i w jego sąsiedztwie, pp. 25-35. Kampinoski Park Narodowy, Izabelin. De Poorter M., Pagad S. & Ullah I. M. 2007. Invasive alien species and protected areas a scoping report. A scoping report. Part I. Scoping the scale and nature of invasive alien species threats to protected areas, impediments to IAS management and means to address those impediments. 94 pp

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Alien vascular plants in the Silesian Upland of Poland: distribution, patterns, impacts and threats

. Faliński J. B. 2004. Inwazje w śiecie roślin: mechanizmy, zagrożenia, projekt badań. - Invasions in the plant world: mechanisms, danger, research project. Phytocoenosis 16 (N. S.) Semin. Geobot. 10: 5-31. Genovesi P. & Shine C. 2004. European Strategy on Invasive Alien Species. Nature and Environment, No. 137, 67 pp. Council of Europe Publishing, Strasbourg. Hulme P. E., Pyšek P., Nentwig W. & Vilà M. 2009. Will threat of Biological Invasions Unite the European Union. Science 324: 40-41. Kornaś

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Isolation and characterization of chloroplast microsatellite markers in the invasive tree species Robinia pseudoacacia L.

Abstract

Robinia pseudoacacia is one of the most problematic invasive alien species in Japan. Information on genetic diversity and population structure is urgently required in order to generate effective management strategies. To assist such efforts we have identified five chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers for R. pseudoacacia by amplifying noncording regions of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) using universal chloroplast primers. Among 857 individuals these cpSSR markers showed substantial polymorphism, with three to eight alleles per locus and gene diversity ranging from 0.387 to 0.713. These cpSSR makers will be useful for analyzing maternal lineages and population genetic structure of R. pseudo - acacia.

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