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Neo-Aristotelian Confucianism? Applicability of virtue ethics in early Confucian studies

, translated by David Ross, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Bernstein, R. J., 1991. Incommensurability and Otherness Revisite. In: Eliot Deutsch (ed.) Culture and Modernity: East-West Philosophic Perspectives. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 85-103. Cua, A. S., 1998. Moral Vision and Tradition: Essays in Chinese Ethics. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press. Hall, D. L. and Roger T. A., 1998. Thinking from the Han: Self, Truth, and Transcendence in Chinese and Western Culture. Albany: State

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Normative and Institutional Dimensions of Rights’ Adjudication Around the World

concerns related to the incommensurability of rights. Issues of conceptual indeterminacy of these rights, in their adjudication will not be addressed here. On this see Gunnar Beck, The Mythology of Human Rights 21 Ratio. Juris . 312 (2008). It is submitted that the implications of this are significant, particularly when coupled with critiques of the supposed objectivity of judicial adjudication. If taken to their last consequences, accepting these premises leads to the conclusion that constitutional rights do not have an objective meaning that can be identified

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Hierarchies of knowledge, incommensurabilities and silences in South African ECD policy: Whose knowledge counts?

Abstract

Policy for young children in South Africa is now receiving high-level government support through the ANC’s renewed commitment to redress poverty and inequity and creating ‘a better life for all’ as promised before the 1994 election. In this article, I explore the power relations, knowledge hierarchies and discourses of childhood, family and society in National Curriculum Framework (NCF) as it relates to children’s everyday contexts. I throw light on how the curriculum’s discourses relate to the diverse South African settings, child rearing practices and world-views, and how they interact with normative discourses of South African policy and global early childhood frameworks. The NCF acknowledges indigenous and local knowledges and suggests that the content should be adapted to local contexts. I argue that the good intentions of these documents to address inequities are undermined by the uncritical acceptance of global taken-for-granted discourses, such as narrow notions of evidence, western child development, understanding of the child as a return of investment and referencing urban middle class community contexts and values. These global discourses make the poorest children and their families invisible, and silence other visions of childhood and good society, including the notion of ‘convivial society’ set out in the 1955 Freedom Charter.

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Performing the Unspeakable. Intermedial Events in András Jeles’s Parallel Lives

Abstract

Among the various connotations of intermediality one is related to the performative aspect of the term. As Ágnes Pethő (2011, 42) formulates: “Intermediality is seen, more often than not, as something that actively ‘does,’ ‘performs’ something, and not merely ‘is.’” This notion of intermediality implies a dynamic category within which media constellations are in continuous motion, being reconfigured by one another, the cinematic medium becoming a playground of media interactions. András Jeles, Hungarian experimental filmmaker formulates the paradox that a particular medium can best express its own mediality through the “foreign” material of other arts and media. The medial consonances and dissonances transform the cinematic medium into a liminal space where meaning as event can take shape. Jeles’s film entitled Parallel Lives (Senkiföldje, 1993) is aimed at such event-like liminality in several respects: culturally, it turns towards a burdened site of the still unprocessed past of the Hungarian society; thematically, it addresses the topic of the Holocaust; and medially, it proposes to artistically render the unrepresentable. The film appeals to the other arts, incorporating a set of literary, painterly and musical allusions that contrast a culturally aestheticized view of the child in pain with the ultimate, inescapable and incommensurable reality.

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Marx Back in Schools: Multicultural Education as a Tool of a Better Society

Marx opäť v školách: Multikultúrna výchova ako nástroj lepšej spoločnosti

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Social cost of alcohol: Not always useless even if subjective?

References Aldred, J. (2006): Incommensurability and monetary valuation. Land Economics, 82 (2): 141-161 Melberg, H. O. (2010): Conceptual problems with studies of the social cost of alcohol. Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 27 (4): 287-303 Melberg, H. O. & Hakkarainen, P. & Houborg, E. & Jääskeläinen, M. & Skretting, A. & Ramstedt, M. & Rosenqvist, P. (2011): Measuring the human costs of drug use for friends and family of drug users. The results from a survey in four Nordic

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A Melancholy Journey through Landscapes of Transience
W. G. Sebald: The Rings of Saturn

Abstract

Saturn is the planet of melancholy, about which Walter Benjamin writes: “I came into the world under the sign of Saturn - the star of the slowest revolution, the planet of detours and delays.” W. G. Sebald’s prose poetics seems to be driven by this motion, which is more than a simple state of being: it is a way of perceiving the world as well as a way of writing, perpetual transition, walk, halt, deviation from the road, getting lost and finding the way back. The paper reflects on W. G. Sebald’s The Rings of Saturn (Die Ringe des Saturn: Eine englische Wallfahrt, 1995], a unique literary achievement deeply embedded into the history of literature, culture and the arts, which can be best construed from the direction of “the order of melancholy.” On the pages of the book the reader can traverse, together with the Sebald-narrator, a route in East Anglia, with digressions in various directions of (culture) history. The journey in the concrete physical space turns into an inner journey, into a spiritual pilgrimage; the traversed locations become documents of destruction and transience. From the perspective of the order of melancholy places are determined by their relations, temporality and role in history rather than by their concrete geographic coordinates. The infinitely rich construction of the narrative creates a continuous passage between the local and the universal, the concrete locations of the journey and the scenes of world history, between the time of the journey and the (colonial] past, between East and West. The traversed historical, cultural and medial spaces displace the perception of human existence and result in the incommensurable aesthetic experience of the Sebaldian prose.

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John Searle’s Naturalism as a Hybrid (Property-Substance) Version of Naturalistic Psychophysical Dualism

–5. Kim, Jaegwon. 1978. Supervenience and nomological incommensurables. American Philosophical Quarterly 15: 149–56. Kim, Jaegwon. 1984. Concepts of supervenience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45(2): 153–76. Kim, Jaegwon. 1990. Supervenience as a philosophical concept. Metaphilosophy 21(1–2): 1–27. Kim, Jaegwon. 1993. Supervenience and Mind . New York: Cambridge University Press. Levine, Joseph. 2001. Purple Haze: the Puzzle of Consciousness. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press. Lowe, Edward Jonathan. 2000. An

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Big Data for Biomedical Research and Personalised Medicine: an Epistemological and Ethical Cross-Analysis

Biomedical Big Data . Eds. B.D. Mittelstadt, and L. Floridi. Cham: Springer International Publishing. 1-13. Oberheim, E., and Hoyningen-Huene, P. (2013). “The Incommensurability of Scientific Theories.” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy . Ed. E.N. Zalta, http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2013/entries/incommensurability/ . Popa, F., et al. (2015). “A Pragmatist Approach to Transdisciplinarity in Sustainability Research: From Complex Systems Theory to Reflexive Science.” Futures 65: 45-56. Putnam, H. (1981). Reason, Truth and History

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Frame Semantics in the Arabic Translation of Philosophical Terminology

. Rouen: Publications de l’Université de Rouen. Ghazala, H. 1995. Translation as problems and solutions: A course-book for university students and trainee translators. Valetta Malta: Elga Publication. Hart, R. In Press. “Translating the Untranslatable: From Copula to Incommensurable Worlds”. To appear in Tokens of Exchange: The Problem of Translation in Global Circulations, edited by Lydia H. Liu. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press (in press); an earlier version is being published as "Translating Worlds: Incommensurability and Problems

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