Search Results

1 - 10 of 349 items :

  • "Happiness" x
Clear All
Adventures in Higher Education, Happiness, And Mindfulness

life force was similar to gravity, electricity, and magnetism in the sense there are (differential) equations that describe how and why acupuncture works. I found it fun and helpful to apply calculus in understanding practically every aspect of life, Oscar E. Fernandez, Everyday Calculus: Discovering the Hidden Math All Around Us (2017). including biology, economics, and social interaction. Oscar E. Fernandez, The Calculus of Happiness: How a Mathematical Approach to Life Adds up to Health, Wealth, and Love (2017). I delighted in learning how to apply calculus to

Open access
Material Well-being and Happiness in Transition Countries

References Clark, A., & Senik, C. (2011). Will GDP Growth Increase Happiness in Developing Countries? (SSRN Scholarly Paper No. ID 1796590). Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network. Database - Eurostat. (n.d.). Retrieved May 22, 2017, from http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database Diener, E., Ng, W., Harter, J., & Arora, R. (2010). Wealth and happiness across the world: material prosperity predicts life evaluation, whereas psychosocial prosperity predicts positive feeling. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Open access
The Economics of Happiness: Future or Reality in Russia?

References Centre of Humanitarian Technologies. (2014). Gallup International Research: Global Happiness Index 2014. Retrieved February 05, 2015, from http://gtmarket.ru/news/2014/02/27/6608 Centre of Humanitarian Technologies. (2014). Happy Planet Index. Retrieved February 05, 2015, from http://gtmarket.ru/ratings/happy-planet-index/info Centre of Humanitarian Technologies. (2014).The Legatum Prosperity Index. February 05, 2015, http

Open access
Metaphors of Happiness in English and Russian

Abstract

According to Ekman et al. (1972), happiness is one of the six universal basic human emotions. Kövecses (2000) claims that certain aspects of the conceptualization of emotions are universal or nearuniversal. The paper compares linguistic expressions to discuss the question of the universality of the emotion happiness and its metaphors in English and Russian.

Open access
Analysis of Happiness in EU Countries Using the Multi-Model Classification based on Models of Symbolic Data

Bibliography Billard L., Diday E., 2006, Symbolic Data Analysis. Conceptual Statistics and Data Mining , John Wiley & Sons, Chichester. Bock H.-H., Diday E. (eds.), 2000, Analysis of Symbolic Data. Explanatory Methods for Extracting Statistical Information from Complex Data , Springer-Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg. Celeux G., Govaert G., 1995, Gaussian parsimonious clustering models , Pattern Recognition, 28(5), pp. 781-793. Deaton A., Stone A.A., 2013, Two happiness puzzles , American Economic Review, vol. 103(3), pp. 591-597. Diday

Open access
From C. S. Lewis’ Joy to Nicolae Steinhardt’s Happiness

Abstract

The paper highlights common or divergent points in the way in which the concept of ”joy” is reflected in two masterpieces of Christian literature: Surprised by Joy (C. S. Lewis) and The Diary of Happiness (N. Steinhardt)

Open access
Empowerment Rights and Happiness Gap in Post-socialist Countries

1 Introduction ‘What is happiness?’–this question through ages captured the attention of many scholars representing various branches of science such as theology, psychology and sociology. The notion of happiness was recognised in antiquity by Aristoteles, who defined it as the eudemonic state that could be achieved through fulfilment of human potentialities ( Fischer, 2009 ). These include both the potentialities that are shared by all humans and those unique ones that distinguish each individual from others ( Waterman, 1993 ). This concept is the basis of

Open access
In Sachen Glück. Ein genetisch-phänomenologischer Ansatz / Concerning Happiness. Reflexions from the Genetic Phenomenological Point of View

Summary

Modern empirical research considers happiness to be identical with a subjective feeling of pleasure. This refers to both assessments of actual satisfactions of need and representations of possible satisfactions of need. Thereby, the aspects of cognitive representations of happiness are mainly focused, while the performing subject remains disregarded. The phenomenological approach tries to counteract such a situation. Phenomenology allows us to differentiate ‘striving towards happiness’ and the ‘experienced happiness’ as different polarities of this phenomenon. Based on this three aspects can be distinguished: (1) the present experience of happiness as an experience of satisfying actual urgent needs; (2) the temporally enduring form of (self-)satisfaction in the individual life; (3) the ethical form of happiness as felicity (Glückseligkeit) implying the teleological determination of human existence realized through socialization. In this paper, these aspects are considered phenomenological through intentional genetic analysis and taking into account some psychoanalytic results. This article aims at showing that happiness, particularly in the ethical form of felicity, cannot be considered as merely an individual issue, but is rather closely related to the sociality of human experience and to the intersubjective constitution of our shared reality.

Open access
Trying to put a name tag on Subjective Wellbeing

References Andrews, F. M., Withey, S. B., 1976. “Social indicators of wellbeing”, available at: http://www.erin.utoronto.ca/~w3psyuli/SWBStructure.pdf Argyle, M., Martin, M., Crossland, J. 1989. “Happiness as a function of personality and social encounters”, Recent advances in social psychology: an international perspective, 189-203. Blanchflower, D., 2009. “International Evidence on Well-being”, NBER Working Paper No 14318, available at: http://www.nber.org/papers/w14318 Chapple, S., 2010

Open access
In Pursuit of Happiness: Escape, Change, and Return in Contemporary Academic Novels, Or Why I Read Campus Novels, But Possibly Shouldn’t

Abstract

In this personal essay, the author compares her academic experiences to those of characters in the campus novels she enjoys reading. The novels she discusses here share a thematic concern with happiness and all seem to indicate that professional fulfillment and academic status are not sufficient in order to achieve that state.

Open access