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Pay Satisfaction and Organizational Politics as Predictors of Quality of Work Life among Government Employees

Abstract

The study investigated the predictive role of pay satisfaction and organisational politics on quality of work life. Herzberg’s Two-Factor Theory was used as a theoretical framework in this study. Cross sectional survey research design was adopted. Data were collected from 429 respondents consisting of (Females = 231(53.8%), Males = 198(46.2%) (Mean age = 39.14, S.D = 12.07) via a simple random and convenience sampling techniques. Work-Related Quality of life scale (WRQLS), Pay Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) and Perceived Organisational Politics Scale (POPS) were used as instrument for data collection. Data collected were analysed using Pearson moment correlation (PPMC) and Multiple Regression analysis. There was significant positive relationship between pay satisfaction and quality of work life. Positive relationship was found between organisational politics and the quality of work life. Finally, pay satisfaction and organisational politics jointly predict quality of work life. These findings have implications for putting up psychological interventions aim at improving the quality of work life of government employees.

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The implementation of policy for the appointment of government employees with work contract in New State Universities (A Study in Borneo Tarakan University)

Abstract

This research investigated the implementation of policy for the appointment of lecturers and education staffs in Borneo Tarakan University as government employees based on work contract. One of the attempt made by the government to evenly provide higher education access throughout Indonesia was by converting several private-owned universities into new state-owned universities. The policy explained that all properties, students, rights and obligation which had been under private institutions’ responsibility were then transferred to the government. However, this policy excludes the transfer of employees who work in the universities. The policy also mentions that all staffs are required to carry out their regular works until new regulations are released. Unfortunately, this policy often led to issues regarding the certainty of employee’s status at work as. After going through a complex process, Presidential Regulation Number 10 of 2016 has been released, in which it is stated that all lecturers and education staffs are appointed as government employees based on work contract. Despite the release of this regulation, until the time this research was conducted, the appointment had not yet been carried out. This descriptive qualitative research has revealed that the policy has not yet been well administered in Borneo Tarakan University due to some problems.

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Composite Index of Local Government Employees Satisfaction

. Customer and Local Government Employees Satisfaction , carried out in the framework of the project: Implementation of management improvements in local government units in the area of Western Pomerania province . Project manager: T. Lubińska, J. Witek. Ebert, U. & Welsch, H. (2004). Meaningful environmental indices: A social choice approach. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management , Vol. 47, No. 2. Fernando, M.A.C.S.S., Samita, S. & Abeynayake, R. (2012). Modified Factor Analysis to Construct Composite Indices: Illustration on Urbanization Index. Tropical

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Tourist Activity of Local Government Employees on the Example of Warsaw Studies

Tourist Activity of Local Government Employees on the Example of Warsaw Studies

Introduction. The aim of this study was to determine the form, nature and level of participation of Warsaw local government employees in tourism. Identification of the relevant characteristics of this group can lead to the knowledge of its behaviour, and ultimately to conduct effective health intervention-promotional activities. Material and methods. The questionaire study covered 321 local government employees (121 male, 200 female). The study was conducted using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 17 (SPSS). Assessment of the relationship of demographic variables with the type of trip and the level of tourism activity were made using chi-square statistics and adjusted residuals. The level of participation in tourism was determined using principal components analysis. Results. Short-term trips reported 87% of local administration employees, long-term - 77% and international - 26%. Average number of short trips was 7.0±7.2, long - 2.1±1.44 and international - 1.4±0.8. Very low levels of tourism activity characterized 32%, low - 15%, moderate - 21%, high - 17% and very high - 14% of the respondents. Education is the main factor that determines the participation and level of tourism activity of respondents. Conclusions. Often the trips declared are not compatible with the level of tourist activity - analysis based on the number of trips a year (short, long and international). It follows that for half of the respondents participation in tourism is sporadic.

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Helping Raise the Official Statistics Capability of Government Employees

Abstract

Both the production and the use of official statistics are important in the business of government. In New Zealand, concern persists about many government advisors’ low level of statistical capability. One programme designed specifically to enhance capability is New Zealand’s National Certificate of Official Statistics, first introduced in 2007 and originally targeted at government policy analysts and advisors. It now includes participants from many agencies, including the National Statistics Office. The competency-based 40-credit certificate comprises four taught units that aim to give students skills in basic official statistics and in critically evaluating statistical, research, policy, or media publications for their quality (of data, survey design, analysis, and conclusions) and appropriateness for some policy issue (e.g., how to reduce problem gambling), together with an ‘umbrella’ workplace-based statistics project. Case studies are used to embed the statistics learning into the real-world context of these students. Several surveys of students and their managers were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of the certificate in terms of enhancing skill levels and meeting organisational needs and also to examine barriers to completion of the certificate. The results were used to both modify the programme and extend its international applicability.

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Paid maternity leave extension and exclusive breastfeeding practice: evidence from Brunei

) for civil servants (public sector or government employees) and 13 weeks (or 91 days) for private sector employees, consistent with recommendations by the International Labour Organization [ 12 ]. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of EBF among employed and nonworking mothers, before and after implementing the Brunei Maternity Leave Regulation 2011, to determine the effect of PML on EBF prevalence, and to determine the effect of sociodemographic variables such as maternal race, area of residence, and the sex of the infant on EBF prevalence

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»Beamtengefühl«: Soziale Funktionen von Emotionen im österreichischen Staatsdienst der Zwischenkriegszeit

Abstract

Research on emotions in the 20th century has shown that in the period after WWI there has been a general tendency to control and suppress the display (if not the experience) of emotions. Based on various sources such as conduct books, autobiographical prose, and disciplinary files this article highlights the role emotions played in civil service in interwar Austria. Emotions could be a disturbance of administrative procedure and everyday office life, but they clearly served to regulate power and gender relations between colleagues, and to define personal boundaries. Specific focus is placed on the interrelation of emotions and political affiliations of government employees, on the particularities of greeting in the office, and on „Beamtengefühl“ – a special feature of this socio-professional group.

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A Study on Fire Safety on Residential and Commercial Construction Sites

Abstract

The construction industry in India is the country’s second largest industrial sector, after agriculture. The construction industry makes a remarkable contribution to the Indian economy and provides employment to a large number of people of India. Fire is a chemical reaction of a combustible substance with oxygen, involving heat and is usually accompanied by a visual flame or incandescence. Ensuring fire safety has always been a challenge to the stakeholders, i.e. building owners, construction companies, contractors and sub-contractors, and government employees due to the multiplicity of the factors involved and their complexity. There are various legal standards and requirements for ensuring fire safety on construction sites. The buildings are normally provided with firewalls during construction and these firewalls separate two structures or divide a structure into smaller portions to prevent the spread of fire. The lightweight construction and trusses are designed to support only their own weight. During a fire, if one fails, a domino effect happens and all fail rapidly within 5 to 10 minutes. Prolonged exposure to fire may result in structural collapse and injury or death of the occupants of the building under construction. Fire safety on construction sites is still in its primitive stages in India. There is a great necessity to improve fire safety on construction sites to protect construction workers and other occupants of the buildings. This study aims to design and implement fire safety systems for construction sites, thereby enhancing the standards to meet the system requirements at par with global standards.

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Analysis of Trends in Gross Domestic and Household Savings and its Components in India

Abstract

India is having a long-term oriented culture where people are more focused on their future rather than present. Due to this the savings rate in India has always remain at a significant level. India’s savings performance has been quite impressive in a cross-country context. India’s gross domestic savings rate in the recent period is comparable to Indonesia, Thailand and Korea, much lower than that of China, Malaysia and Singapore but much higher than that of many other emerging and advanced economies. India ranked 2nd in terms of gross domestic savings among top 10 economies of the world in the year 2015, just below that of China. The gross domestic savings which stood at around 23 per cent in 1990 has reached around 35 per cent in 2015, well above the world average of 23.5 per cent. Various factors which resulted in an increase in gross domestic savings rate are rapid economic growth, large scale migration of rural population to urban area, Rise in income of government employees after 6th pay commission, persistence of saving habits among households, awareness programs by government and financial institutions etc. Household savings has always remained a major component of gross domestic savings followed by private corporate savings and public sector savings. It was the result of high savings rate that the Indian economy stand strong during the global recession of 2008. During the tenth five year plan i.e. from 2002-2007 the increasing in gross domestic savings was maximum among all. Bank deposits have always remain the most preferred avenue for savings for households. Total deposits in Indian banks crossed Rs100 billion mark in 2017.

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Immigration of Highly–Skilled Workers to Estonia: Current Trends and Legislative Framework / Imigrácia Kvalifikovanej Pracovnej Sily Do Estónska: Súčasné Trendy A Právny Rámec

Abstract

Estonian immigration policies have been largely influenced by its historical development. The figures from 1989 show that the population was only 61.5 percent Estonian by origin with the remaining 38.5 percent belonging to other ethnic backgrounds. Remarkably, 26 percent of the Estonian population were foreign born.(1) After joining the European Union in 2004, Estonia faced a high rate of outward migration, which was connected, inter alia, to the higher average salaries of the other Member States. The rapid expansion of the Estonian economy and growth of employment coupled with the negative population growth contributed to the need of foreign skilled labour.(2) Besides, the recent reform in the education system accounts for shortage of technical specialists in some labour areas.(3) It is thus not surprising that Estonian government employs focused, selective and demand-based immigration strategies to fight the ‘global war for talents’.(4),(5) The objective of the restrictive immigration policy is to attract first and foremost highly qualified professionals in the strategic economic areas while avoiding uncontrolled immigration and increase the sustainability and competitiveness of the Estonian economy. First part of current paper provides an overview of who falls under the classification of a ‘skilled’ worker and the Estonian perspective on talent attraction and retention. The second part lays down the existing legal framework, which covers the conditions and procedures of knowledge-worker’s immigration to Estonia. Particularly, this includes the relatively recent amendments to the Aliens Act 2004, which came into force in 2008 and set forth a facilitated approach towards entry and residence requirements.

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