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References VI.1 Primary sources Anonymous, Liber de arte Dimicatoria, 1320-1330. Leeds, Royal Armouries, Ms I.33. Anonymous, compendium (Hans Talhoffer Fight book), 17th c. Wolfenbüttel, Herzog August Bibliothek, Cod. Guelf. 125.16 Extrav. VI.2 Secondary literature Cinato, Franck, ‘Development, Diffusion and Reception of the Buckler plays: A Fighting Art in the Making, a case study’, in Late Medieval and Early Modern Fight Books, ed. by Daniel Jaquet, Timothy Dawson and Karin Verelst (Leiden: Brill, 2016). Cinato, Franck, and André Surprenant, ‘L’escrime à la

Abstract

A growing body of research on fight books and historical European martial arts has appeared in academic circles over the last fifteen years. It has also broken through the doors of patrimonial institutions. From curiosities in exhibitions about knighthood, to dedicated temporary exhibitions about historical European martial arts, the fight books have received more and more attention from museum professionals. This article attempts to present an exhaustive list of fight books displayed in museum exhibitions over the last fifty years. It then proposes a critical view about how and why they were displayed from the perspective of the curators, based on a review of the exhibition catalogues.

Abstract

Twenty-six years after the first edition and translation by Sydney Anglo in 1991 of the anonymous manuscript Le Jeu de la hache , many elements can still be significantly improved. This paper offers a completely new critical edition of the text, and a major revision of the translation. This article includes a detailed glossary as well as notes to discuss the many ambiguous passages in the original text. Finally, the studies of the language, the vocabulary, the dialect, the writing style and the physical document make it possible to refine the dating of the manuscript to the third quarter of the fifteenth century, between 1460 and 1485, and its origin, probably Flanders or Wallonia in the entourage of the dukes of Burgundy.

Abstract

The works of Pietro Monte had been forgotten for many centuries, and only recently have their merits been recognised again. This research note presents a newly discovered manuscript, the Libro del exercicio de las armas, a 19th century copy of the Spanish vernacular version of the Collectanea known as the “Escorial Manuscript”. The discovery is introduced by a brief survey of the citations of this manuscript and its source in the historiography and by a map displaying the known printed copies of the Collectanea. A review of the bibliography and provenance of the manuscript contributes to our understanding of its historical importance.

Abstract

The Thun-Hohenstein album, long-known as the Thun’sche Skizzenbuch, is a bound collection of 112 drawings that visualize armoured figures at rest and in combat, as well as empty armours arrayed in pieces. The collection gathers drawings that span the period from the 1470s to around 1590. While most of the images were executed in Augsburg during the 1540s, the album’s three oldest drawings date to the late-fifteenth century. Two of these works, which form a codicological interlude between the first and second quires, find parallels in the illustrations of contemporaneous martial treatises. This article traces the pictorial lineages of these atextual images through comparative analyses of fight books produced in the German-speaking lands, and considers how the representational strategies deployed in martial treatises inflected the ways that book painters and their audiences visualized the armoured body. This exploration situates a manuscript from which one of the drawings derives, Peter Falkner’s Art of Knightly Defense, now in Vienna, within the Augsburg book painters’ workshops that would later give rise to the Thun album. Finally, this study considers how the transmission and representation of martial knowledge in late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century Augsburg contributed to the later depictions of armoured bodies that populate the album.

Abstract

The sixteenth-century Collectanea of the condottiero Pietro Monte contains some of the most thorough writings that exist pertaining to the use of staff weapons. A detailed study of how these weapons are categorised, contextualised, and used in Monte’s work can, due to their sometimes limited treatment in other fight books, allow for a comparative approach between Monte’s works and those of other fight book authors. Such a study allows for a more complete understanding of how Monte’s work fits in with the wider fight book genre, properly contextualising the Collectanea, and demonstrating to what extent this important but often overlooked text should be considered revolutionary or reflective of contemporary military and martial trends. In this article is discussed Monte’s approach to defining staff weapons, his contextualisation of staff weapons according to military and martial environments, and Monte’s teachings on the use of staff weapons.

Abstract

The phenomenon of the fight book is not restricted to the European tradition. Similar artefacts, usually combining text and image to describe the techniques of close quarter combat with and without weapons, exist also in various Asian cultures, in China, Japan, Korea, and India. In the article, the question shall be raised in how far and to which end fight books of different cultures can be taken into one perspective, and be compared. To do so, similarities and dissimilarities between European and early Chinese fight books will be pointed out, and preliminary areas for comparison will be introduced. The aim of the article is to raise awareness for the topic, and to lay the ground for further discussion between specialists on the respective European and Chinese fields.

IV. BIBLIOGRAPHY IV.1. Primary sources (manuscript and print) Anonymous, [Wrestling book], Hans Sittich, Augsburg, ca. 1512. Anonymous, [Wrestling book], Hans Wurm, Landshut, about 1507. Anonymous, [Wrestling book], Matthias Hupfuff, Straßbourg, ca. 1510-12. Graz, Universitätsbibliothek, M. 963 (Hans Czynner, [fight book], 1538); edition see secondary literature Bergner/Giessauf Hieronymus, Sophronius Eusebius: Dises büchlein sagt von dem heyligen Job [...], Bartholomäus Kistler, Straßburg, 1498. Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Cod. Icon. 393, 1 & 2

V. BIBLIOGRAPHY V.1. Primary source Anonymous, [Fight Book], 1657 [Wolfenbüttel, Herzog-August Library, Cod. Guelf. 264.23 Extrav]. Forordninger, Recesser og andre kongelige Breve, Danmarks Lovgivning vedkommende, 1558-1660 [ed. Secher, V. A, Copenhagen: C.A Reitzel, 1887]. G. A., Den Ridderlige og Adelige Fecht-Konstis grundelige oc Methodiske Beskriffuelse, som udi dette Exertio sig forlyste oc versere, som ved en Gienvey, til Eenfache Rapiers Kundskab baade udi Stød oc Hug at giøre imod den Keigthaandet Saavel som imod den Ræthaandet , Melchior Martzan

access 27.06.2017]. VII.2. Secondary Literature Anthore Baptiste, Soline and Baptiste, Nicolas, “Constriction – Construction, a short history of specialised wearing apparel for athletic activities from the fourteenth century to nineteenth century”, Acta Periodica Duellatorum 5/2 (2017), 73-95. Binard, Fanny and Jaquet, Daniel, “Investigation on the collation of the first Fight book (Leeds, Royal Armouries, Ms I.33)”, Acta Periodica Duellatorum 4/1 (2016), 3-22. Braunfels, Wolfgang, ed., Lexikon der christlichen Ikonographie. Bd. 8. Ikonographie der Heiligen Meletius