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Prediction of Spirometric Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) Data Using Support Vector Regression

Prediction of Spirometric Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) Data Using Support Vector Regression

In this work, prediction of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) in pulmonary function test is carried out using the spirometer and support vector regression analysis. Pulmonary function data are measured with flow volume spirometer from volunteers (N=175) using a standard data acquisition protocol. The acquired data are then used to predict FEV1. Support vector machines with polynomial kernel function with four different orders were employed to predict the values of FEV1. The performance is evaluated by computing the average prediction accuracy for normal and abnormal cases. Results show that support vector machines are capable of predicting FEV1 in both normal and abnormal cases and the average prediction accuracy for normal subjects was higher than that of abnormal subjects. Accuracy in prediction was found to be high for a regularization constant of C=10. Since FEV1 is the most significant parameter in the analysis of spirometric data, it appears that this method of assessment is useful in diagnosing the pulmonary abnormalities with incomplete data and data with poor recording.

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Does the Length of Fielding Period Matter? Examining Response Scores of Early Versus Late Responders

Abstract

This article discusses the potential effects of a shortened fielding period on an employee survey’s item and index scores and respondent demographics. Using data from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, we investigate whether early responding employees differ from later responding employees. Specifically, we examine differences in item and index scores related to employee engagement and global satisfaction. Our findings show that early responders tend to be less positive, even after adjusting their weights for nonresponse. Agencies vary in their prevalence of late responders, and score differences become magnified as this proportion increases. We also examine the extent to which early versus late responders differ on demographic characteristics such as grade level, supervisory status, gender, tenure with agency, and intention to leave, noting that nonminorities and females are the two demographic characteristics most associated with responding early.

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Effects of traditional Chinese medicine nursing combined with conventional nursing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a meta-analysis

training; (3) comparisons: participants in the control group received conventional nursing; (4) outcomes: the study should have reported at least one of the following clinical outcomes: St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, pulmonary function index (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC], FEV1%, and FEV1 predicted value), hospital stay, and clinical efficacy; and (5) study design: RCTs aimed at studying the effect of TCM nursing intervention on the clinical outcome of patients with COPD. Exclusion criteria were as

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Prevalence of impaired lower airway function in Thai patients with allergic rhinitis

especially interleukin (IL)-5 from bone marrow [ 9 ]. The fourth hypothesis is chronic irritation of lower airway from postnasal drip [ 9 ]. To evaluate the lower airway function, spirometry is the standard test. There are various studies from the west that have studied the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities in AR without asthmatic symptoms [ 10 , 11 ]. Force expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) and the forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF 25 _ 75 ) have been proposed as early predictors of small airway hyperresponsiveness [ 11

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Observational study of omeprazole for gastroesophageal reflux on pulmonary function in adult asthmatics

post-treatment study in Thai patients with high-dose oral omeprazole (20 mg twice a day) whose asthma was partly controlled or uncontrolled. Inclusion criterion were (1) age of 18–70 years; (2) were diagnosed as having asthma, which was supported by either documentation of a 12% and 200 mL increase in FEV 1 after use of a bronchodilator or a positive methacholine challenge test; (3) at least 4 weeks of stable use of an inhaled corticosteroid at a dose equivalent to 400 µg or more; (4) partly controlled and uncontrolled asthma as defined by GINA guideline 2008 [ 15

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TNF-α and IL-6 as biomarkers of impaired lung functions in dimethylacetamide exposure

/L, 2.5 mg/L and 5 mg/L) of dimethylacetamide (Sigma Aldrich). Spirometry Measurements Pulmonary function tests were applied to all participants. Standard spirometry measurement was carried out by a dry-seal-spirometry (Zan 100, Spire Health Inc., Oberthulba, Germany). Lung function tests were defined in accordance with the American Thoracic Society standards ( 19 ). Lung function test data included forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC actual, and peak expiratory flow (PEF). Statistical Analysis The Statistical

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Asthma Control Test™ in Assessment of Clinical Asthma Control

Rev. 2006;15(98):17-23. doi:10.1183/09059180.06.00009803 Shirai T, Furuhashi K, Suda T, Chida K. Relationship of the Asthma Control Test with pulmonary function and exhaled nitric oxide. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008;101(6):608-613. PMID:19119704 Schatz M, Li JT, Sorkness CA, Murray JJ, Nathan RA, Marcus P, Kosinski M, Pendegraft TB. Responsiveness of the Asthma Control Test™ (ACT) to changes in specialist ratings of asthma control and FEV 1 . Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004;169: A319

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Inflammatory Biomarkers in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

-reactive protein in patients with COPD, control smokers and non-smokers. Thorax . 2006;61:23-28. 23. Shaaban R, Kony S, Driss F, et al. Change in Creactive protein levels and FEV1 decline: a longitudinal population-based study. Respir Med . 2006;100(12):2112-2120. 24. Donaldson GC. C-reactive Protein: does it predict mortality? Am J Respir Crit Care Med . 2007;175(3):209-210. 25. Aksu F, Çapan N, Aksu K, et al. C-reactive protein levels are raised in stable COPD patients independent of smoking behavior and biomass exposure. J Thorac Dis . 2013

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Relationship Between Airway Resistance indices and Maximal Oxygen Uptake in Young Adults

Relationship Between Airway Resistance indices and Maximal Oxygen Uptake in Young Adults

The present study aims at assessing the relationship between airway resistance indexes (FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC) and maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max) in young adults. Subjects of the study included 50 healthy males (age, 22.1 ± 2.47 years; FEV1, 3.41 ± .66 liter; FVC, 3.96 ± .56 liter; VO2max, 38.83 ± 9.83 ml.kg-1.min-1) studying at Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. After determining subjects' volumes of FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC by digital spirometer, maximal oxygen uptake was measured. The study protocol measured VO2max levels using the sub-maximal Astrand-Ryming test on the ergometer cycle. The data were analyzed through descriptive and inferential statistics. Results revealed a significant correlation among the three independent variables of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC and projected VO2max values. Based on the results, it can be concluded that these parameters have a close interaction with higher VO2max levels, and therefore, having a lower airway resistance seems beneficial.

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Assessment of Air Way Resistance Indexes and Exercise-Induced Asthma after a Single Session of Submaximal Incremental Aerobic Exercise

Assessment of Air Way Resistance Indexes and Exercise-Induced Asthma after a Single Session of Submaximal Incremental Aerobic Exercise

The present study aimed at assessing air way resistance indexes that include FEV1 (Force expiration Volume in one second), FVC (Forced vital capacity) and FEV1/FVC and exercise-induced asthma (EIA) after one session of sub maximal incremental aerobic exercise. Fifty healthy male subjects (age 19-26) from the faculty of Physical Education, University of Shahid Chamran served as the participants of the study. They were randomly assigned to either exercise or control groups. Body height, body mass and pulmonary factors were measured in the pre-test conditions. The study protocol included a sub maximal incremental Astrand - Rhyming test on an ergocycle. After performing this test by the exercise group, FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC, were measured again for both groups and compared with pre test evaluations. The data were analyzed through descriptive and inferential statistics (dependent and independent t test). Results showed that there was a significant difference in FEV1 between the two groups after the exercise protocol (p ≤ 0.05). There was no significant difference in FVC between the two groups after exercise, and a significant difference was registered in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC between pre-test and post-test results in the group that performed the aerobic test protocol (p ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that one sub maximal incremental aerobic exercise session causes a significant change in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC, and causes exercise-induced asthma.

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