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English for Academic Purposes: A need for remodelling

. International Educational Journal, 3 (4), 70-85. García, O. (2009). Bilingual education in the 21st century: A global perspective . Chichester, West Sussex. Garcia, O., & Li, W. (2014). Translanguaging: Language, bilingualism and education . Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Green, A. (2014). Exploring language testing and assessment . London: Routledge. Gu, L., & So, V. (2015). Voices from stakeholders: What makes an academic English test ‘international’? Journal of English for Academic Purposes 18 , 9-24. Harding, L. (2014). Communicative

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Functions of Expressions of Futurality in Professional Economic Texts

česky ČSAV, 1986. 160-191. Print. Huddleston, Rodney D. and Geoff rey K. Pullum. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Print. Hyland, Ken. English for Academic Purposes: An Advanced Resource Book. London: Routledge, 2006. Print. Lock, Graham. Functional English Grammar: An Introduction for Second Language Teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Print. Matthews, Peter. The Concise Dictionary of Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press

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Exploring Nominalization in the Introduction and Method Sections of Applied Linguistics Research Articles: a Qualitative Approach

, L., & Amalsaleh, E. 2014. A comparison between the use of nominalization in medical papers by English and Iranian writers. International Journal of Applied Linguistics and English Literature, 3(6), 1-6. Martin, J. R. 2008. Incongruent and proud: De-vilifying nominalization. Discourse and Society, 19, 801-810. Martinez, I. A. 2003. Aspects of theme in the method and discussion sections of biology journal articles in English. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 2, 103-123. Ravelli, J. L. 2003. “Renewal of

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The study of conceptual metaphors in ESAP L2 writing: range and variability

Abstract

The article presents the study of the influence of professional competence of EFL learners on their academic writing. The task was approached through analyzing learners’ competence in specific knowledge domains - knowledge of terms and specific concepts, represented as conceptual metaphors. Conceptual metaphor models were analyzed in the English written texts produced by Russian students with different competences in economics – at both non-professional and professional levels of academic discourse (NPAD and PAD respectively). Metaphor Identification Procedure VU University Amsterdam (MIPVU) was applied to metaphor identification, and alternative metaphor and preferential conceptualization analysis was performed to compare the scope of source and the range of target in NPAD and PAD. Findings highlight the areas of commonality as well as divergence in terms of students’ professional competence represented in conceptual metaphors in L2 writing. The main differences in the scope of the source analysis are quantitative rather than qualitative. The range of target comparison between NPAD and PAD indicates a significantly larger range of targets for the professional level students, a lower level of metaphorization for the non-professional level, and inclusive strategies across the two levels. Practical recommendations suggest an improved research methodology for studying metaphor production in EAP and ESP as well as a deeper understanding of ESP content and its structure.

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HE ESP TEACHER AS RESEARCHER

). Needs analysis for academic legal English courses in Israel: a model of setting priorities. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 2 , 125-146. doi: 10.1016/S1475-1585(03)00013-4. Drnyei, Z. (2007). Research Methods in Applied Linguistics . Oxford: Oxford University Press. Duff, P. (2007). Qualitative approaches to classroom research. In J. Cummis & Davidson, Ch. (Eds.), International Handbook of English Language Teach- ing (pp. 973-986). Springer International Handbooks of Education. Kassim, H. & Ali, F. (2010

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Willingness to Communicate, Possible Selves, Learner Autonomy, and Academic Target Needs: Implications for Sustainable Development in L2 Pedagogy

University Press. Jamil, M. G. (2010). Promoting learner autonomy on a university course of English for academic purposes: A BRAC university case study. BRAC University Journal , 7 (1), 43–52. Jordan, R. R. (2002). The growth of EAP in Britain. Journal of English for Academic Purposes , 1 (1), 69–78. Kang, S. J. (2005). Dynamic emergence of situational willingness to communicate in a second language. System , 33 (2), 277–292. Khajavy, G. H., Ghonsooly, B., Fatemi, A. H., & Choi, C. W. (2016). Willingness to communicate in English: A

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Adverbial Markers of Epistemic Modality Across Disciplinary Discourses: A Contrastive Study of Research Articles in Six Academic Disciplines

English for Academic Purposes 4. 163-178. DOI: 10.1016/j.jeap.2004.08.001 Lewis, Diana. 2006. Discourse markers in English: A discourse-pragmatic view. In Kerstin Fischer (ed.), Approaches to discourse particles, 43-59. Amsterdam: Elsevier. Livnat, Zohar. 2012. Dialogue, science and academic writing. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Lyons, John. 1977. Semantics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Martin, James R. & David Rose. 2003. Working with discourse: Meaning beyond the clause. New York

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Perceptions and Performance: Students’ Attitudes towards Academic English Writing

. Research in the Teaching of English . 9, 242-249. 5. Gillett, A. A Guide for Students in Higher Education . (n.d) from Using English for Academic Purposes. Web Site: http://www.uefap.com/materials/matfram.htm 6. Graham, S., Berninger, V. & Fan, W. (2007). The structural relationship between writing attitude and writing achievement in first and third grade students. Contemporary Educational Psychology , 32(3), 516-536. 7. Harder,A."The Neglected Life Skill" Journal of Extension. http://www.joe.org/joe/2006february

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The Nature of the Facebook Group Learning Environment: Insights from University Students

Abstract

The paper analyses the inherent features of the Facebook learning environment that were identified by university students enrolled in an English for Academic Purposes course. The presented case study is based on students’ subjective theories that have been reconstructed from semi-structured interviews and diaries. The research material involves qualitative data acquired from thirty-four university students. The identified characteristics relate to four areas, namely motivation, distraction, security, and structure. The dominant strengths and weaknesses of the discussed learning environment are singled out.

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A Blended Learning Approach to Academic Writing and Presentation Skills

Abstract

Blended learning is a common learning mode in higher education which combines the use of online and face-to-face classroom learning. The use of blended learning for English for Academic Purposes (EAP) with non-native university students, however, can pose challenges from the methods and materials to the student perceptions. This article describes the blended learning implementation of an EAP course for academic writing and presentation skills and how the students perceived the blended course mode, methods, workload, learning atmosphere and challenges. Results indicate that non-native university students appreciated blended learning for the EAP course and found the flexibility and convenience of blended learning beneficial to their EAP learning. This encourages the further development of blended learning options for EAP writing and presentation skills as students no longer require the extensive classroom teaching context but instead adapt well to self-regulated and reflective learning of EAP.

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