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A New Economic Governance Model for Greece in the 21st Century

References Barnes, J. (ed.) 1984, The Complete Works of Aristotle: The Revised Oxford Translation, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Blyth, M. 2013, Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Dixit, A. 2008, ‘Economic governance’, in Steven N. Durlauf and Lawrence E. Blume (eds), The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd edition, Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Eichengreen,B. 2014, “ Requiem for Global Imbalances”, Project Syndicate

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Enhanced Economic Governance in the EU: Alternative to a Political Union?

., VoxEU.org Publication, Centre for Economic Policy Research, June. De Grauwe P. (2010a), What kind of governance for the eurozone?, CEPS Policy Brief, No. 214/September 20. P. R. Lane (2012), The European Sovereign Debt Crisis, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Volume 26, Number 3, Summer, Pages 49-68. MEMO/10/455 (2010). Economic governance package, Brussels, 29 September 2010. MEMO/11/898 (2011). EU Economic governance “Six-Pack” enters into force, Brussels, 12 December 2011. Mundell, R. 1961, A Teory of Optimum Currency Areas, American Economic Review

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The emergence of New Economic Governance and its impact on Services of General Economic Interest

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact of austerity measures on national social protection mechanisms and on the European Social Model. The study is based on an in-depth analysis of austerity measures adopted in Italy and Portugal and the evolution of several indicators, such as unemployment rates and the percentage of citizens at risk of poverty.

The analysis demonstrates that measures adopted in the field of new economic governance have had an impact on the organization and provision of SGEIs and have affected the solidity of the national welfare state. It will be argued that in this context the promotion of a social dimension of the EU requires innovative methods for the regulation of new economic governance.

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Solidarity in the European Union in Times of Economic Crisis

Abstract

The present special issue of Perspectives on Federalism reflects on the nature and characteristics of solidarity within a supranational context, it explains what solidarity has meant so far in the EU, how much solidarity we had during the crisis, what type of solidarity is needed and how to build it. It focuses on the new economic governance and its solidarity mechanisms during and after the economic crisis but tackles other related fields such as its impact on services of general economic interest or the European budget, as well as other areas where solidarity is also discussed such as the free movement of persons.

This monographic issue has its origin in the International Conference “Solidarity in Hard Times. Solidarity and the European Social Model in times of economic crisis” organized by the University Institute for European Studies (IDEE) on 11-12 June 2015 in Madrid, within the Jean Monnet Network MoreEU (“More Europe to overcome the crisis”).

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Monetary and Fiscal Arrangements for the Eurozone: Some Unconventional Proposals

Abstract

Contributions in this special issue argue make a number of points with regard to the urgent need to change the economic governance of the Eurozone, pointing at some tools to increase its spending capacity. The process of potential fragmentation ignited by the recent vote on Brexit make such changes even more urgent, signalling the need to provide concrete responses to citizens, in order to show that the euro area, and the EU at large, are able to satisfy some of their crucial needs. The papers which make up this special issue were presented in Florence, at a meeting held in the framework of a Jean Monnet + Project called MoreEU. The first section deals with the reform of the budget; the second with a further use of quantitative easing and the role of the ECB.

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From procedural disagreement to joint scrutiny? The Interparliamentary Conference on Stability, Economic Coordination and Governance

-Beiträge zu den Europäischen Verfassungswissenschaften , XII(1). • Cooper Ian, 2016, ‘The politicization of interparliamentary relations in the EU: Constructing and contesting the “Article 13 Conference” on economic governance’, Comparative European Politics , XIV(2): 196-214. • Cooper Ian, 2017, ‘The Emerging Order of Interparliamentary Cooperation in the Post-Lisbon EU’, in Jancic Davor (ed), National Parliaments after the Lisbon Treaty and the Euro Crisis , Oxford University Press, Oxford, 227-246. • Costa Olivier and Latek Marta, 2001, ‘Paradoxes and

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Promoting solidarity in crisis times: Building on the EU Budget and the EU Funds

-250. Somek Alexander, 2007, ‘Solidarity decomposed: being and time in European citizenship’, European Law Review, XXXII(6): 787 - 818. Steinar Stjernø, 2005, Solidarity in Europe: The History of an Idea, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Trichet Jean Claude, 2012, ‘Reflections on Unconventional Monetary Policy Measures and on European Economic Governance: Towards an Economic and Fiscal Federation by exception’, Mandeville Lecture 2012 - Erasmus University Rotterdam (6 June 2012). Vanistendael Frans, 2010, ‘The Crisis: A Window of

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A New Form of Democratic Oversight in the EU: The Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group for Europol

‘Article 13 Conference’ on Economic Governance’, Comparative European Politics , XIV(2): 196–214. • Cooper Ian, 2016b, ‘The Interparliamentary Conference on Stability, Economic Coordination and Governance (the “Article 13 Conference”),’ in Lupo Nicola and Fasone Cristina (eds), Interparliamentary Cooperation in the Composite European Constitution , Hart Publishing, Oxford, 247-267. • Cooper Ian, 2015, ‘The Nordic Parliaments and the EU,’ in Caroline Howard Grøn, Peter Nedergaard and Anders Wivel (eds), Still the other European Community? The Nordic

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Fiscal federalism and a separate budget for the euro area

://ec.europa.eu/archives/emu_history/documentation/chapter8/19770401en73macdougallrepvol1.pdf [12th September 2017]. McDougall Report 1977 Report of the Study Group on the Role of the Public Finance in European Integration Brussels, (April 1977) retrieved from http://ec.europa.eu/archives/emu_history/documentation/chapter8/19770401en73macdougallrepvol1.pdf [12th September 2017] Meier, A. (2017), Berlin continues quest for ‘European Monetary Fund’ (March 8 2017), retrieved from https://www.euractiv.com/section/economic-governance/news/berlin-continues-quest-for-european-monetary-fund/ [17th December

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The role of the Capital Markets Union: towards regulatory harmonisation and supervisory convergence

Abstract

The Council is a crucial intergovernmental institution of the European Union. However, the complex, opaque and consensual character of the decision-making process in the Council puts its legitimacy into question. Intergovernmentalist theory posits that it is sufficiently legitimised, indirectly, by the member state governments. Constructivist research, on the other hand, suggests that socialisation might disturb the relaying of positions from the national to the supranational level, as the former approach implies. This paper aims to explore these issues, in particular related to representation and consensus. It contains an analysis of material generated in in-depth interviews. The Capital Markets Union (CMU) initiative serves as an umbrella term for regulatory changes directed at the overall development of European capital markets. As such, when analysing the legal framework of the CMU, it is important to note that this involves an undertaking which goes beyond the regulation of financial systems, also aiming to achieve supervisory convergence throughout the member states of the European Union. Indeed, it is perhaps one of the clearest examples of federal implications within the EU. All the synchronous movements enacted into law, leading towards harmonisation and supervisory convergence, show us that the CMU is an foundational piece in a collective journey towards ever greater integration in terms of economic governance and economic policies. Nonetheless, even if the CMU is one of the few cross-country risk-sharing mechanisms available to the EU, its implementation faces difficulties (as well as the looming Brexit) that demand careful analysis.

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