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Experimental Study of Hybrid Rubberized Composite Slabs

Abstract

Rubberized concrete is made up of scrap tyre rubbers where the fine aggregate is partially replaced by it, as the waste rubber is being a threat to the environment. It is estimated that only 4% of the waste tyre is used in the application of civil engineering and also there is shortage of fine aggregates. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the preliminary concrete properties of M25 and M30 concretes. The fine aggregate is replaced by pre-treated crumb rubber with 10, 15 and 20 % of total weight. Various tests are conducted on the rubberized concrete specimens such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength and slump test. The investigation is carried out to determine the impact load behavior of hybrid rubberized composite slabs. In addition 0%, 1%, 1.5%, and 2% of replacement of rubber fibers for total weight of coarse aggregate is also made. The specimen of size 300 mm x 300 mm x 50 mm thickness is subjected to drop hammer test to find its performance against the impact loads. The number of blows for the first crack and complete failure of slab was found and the characteristics were studied.

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Deflection Ductility of Slabs Made of Hybrid Mesh-And-Fibre-Reinforced Cementbased Composite

Abstract

Steel Mesh-Reinforced Cementitious Composites (SMRCC) (traditionally known as ferrocement) have been in existence for few decades, but have some limitations set on element thickness and number of reinforcing mesh layers and the resulting deflection ductility. Therefore, the author has made an attempt to explore whether deflection ductility will improve in mesh-reinforced cementitious composites (25 mm thick) if discontinuous fibres are added to slab elements. For this purpose, thin slab elements of dimensions 700 mm (length) × 200 mm (width) × 25 mm (thickness) were cast and subjected to four point bending tests. Based on the flexural tests conducted on SMRCC (Control Slab Elements, cast with Steel Mesh Volume of reinforcement, MVr=0.78, 0.94, and 1.23%) and Hybrid Mesh-and-Fibre-Reinforced Cement Based Composite (HMFRCBC) (Test Slab Elements, combining MVr=0.78, 0.94 and 1.23% and Polyolefin Fibre Volume fraction, PO-FVf=0.5-2.5% of volume of specimens, with 0.5% interval), load-deflection and the deflection ductility index were analyzed. From the flexural load-deflection curves it has been observed that HMFRCBC slabs demonstrate higher flexural load-carrying capacity and deflection ductility when compared to SMRCC slabs. This study shows that higher the polyolefin fibre volume fraction (PO-FVr) from 0.5 to 2.5% (with a 0.5% interval) in HMFRCBC slabs, the higher the flexural deflection ductility. The Deflection Ductility Index (DDI) of HMFRCBC (with 5 layers of mesh and PO-FVr=2.5%) is 4.5 times that of SMRCC. This study recommends that HMFRCBC can be used as an innovative construction material due to its higher flexural ductility characteristics.

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Experimental Behaviour of Steel Tubular Columns for Varying in Filled Concrete

Abstract

This paper investigates the behaviour of axially-loaded tubular columns filled with M20 grade concrete and partially replaced concrete. The parameters varying in the study are slenderness ratio (13.27, 16.58 & 19.9), and normal M20 grade concrete, partially replaced quarry dust and concrete debris. The effects of the various concrete mixes and composite action between the steel tube and the concrete core are studied and a graph visualizing the differences between the load carrying capacity and the axial deflection is plotted. Some of the performance indices like the Ductility Index (DI), Concrete Contribution Ratio (CCR), Confinement Index (θ) and Strength Index (SI) are also evaluated and compared amongst the CFST columns. From the results it has been noted that an increase in the L/D ratio decrease the behaviour of the composite columns irrespective of the in filled materials. The composite action was achieved in the CFST columns filled with partially replaced quarry dust and concrete debris when compared with hollow steel columns. The load carrying capacity of the CFST column increases by 32 % compared with the hollow tubular columns.

Open access