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Distributive Justice: From Steinhaus, Knaster, and Banach to Elster and Rawls — The Perspective of Sociological Game Theory

Abstract

This article presents a relatively straightforward theoretical framework about distributive justice with applications. It draws on a few key concepts of Sociological Game Theory (SGT). SGT is presented briefly in section 2. Section 3 provides a spectrum of distributive cases concerning principles of equality, differentiation among recipients according to performance or contribution, status or authority, or need. Two general types of social organization of distributive judgment are distinguished and judgment procedures or algorithms are modeled in each type of social organization. Section 4 discusses briefly the larger moral landscapes of human judgment – how distribution may typically be combined with other value into consideration. The article suggests that Rawls, Elster, and Machado point in this direction. Finally, it is suggested that the SGT framework presented provides a useful point of departure to systematically link it and compare the Warsaw School of Fair Division, Rawls, and Elster, among others.

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Equity versus equality norms of justice and organisational commitment: the moderating role of gender

, 1991 ). However, except in the case of research regarding organisational exit ( Cooper-Hakim and Viswesvaran, 2005 ; Johnson et al., 2009a , b ; Payne and Huffman, 2005 ; Taing et al., 2011 ), the literature on organisational commitment generally has focussed on affective and normative components ( Cropanzano and Folger, 1991 ). Further, studies on organisational justice have identified distributive justice perception as an important dimension that influences organisational commitment ( Cohen- Charash and Spector, 2001 ; Colquitt et al., 2001 ). The notion of

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Motivational effects of pay dispersion in pay for performance programs implemented in Romanian companies

-231. Downes, P.E. and Choi, D. (2014), “Employee reactions to pay dispersion: A typology of existing research”, Human Resource Management Review, Vol. 24, No. 1, pp. 53-66. Fay, C. and Thompson, M. (2001), “Contextual Determinants Of Reward Systems’ Success: An Exploratory Study”, Human Resource Management, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 213-226. Folger, R. and Konovsky, M.A. (1989), “Effects of procedural and distributive justice of reactions to pay decisions”, Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 32, No. 1, pp. 115-130. Gerhart, B. and

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Perceived justice and recovery satisfaction: the moderating role of customer-perceived quality

Abstract

Recovery strategies are critical to service providers in their efforts to maintain satisfied and loyal customers. While the existing research shows that recovery satisfaction is a function of customer perception of distributive, procedural and interactional justice, the present study considers an important contextual factor - customer-perceived quality of the service provider in the evaluation of justice dimensions and satisfaction. To test the hypotheses proposed, a survey was carried out in the mobile services context. The findings reveal that customer-perceived quality affects the evaluation of justice dimensions and its outcomes. The findings reveal that while distributive justice enhances recovery satisfaction for low perceived quality services, the procedural justice resulted in greater satisfaction in high perceived quality services. Thus, by understanding the role of customer-perceived quality, service managers can deliver effective recovery strategies thereby enhancing satisfaction and loyalty.

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Do fair and just systems require compensation for the disadvantages of the natural lottery? a discussion on society's duties on the provision of gene therapy

Abstract

Genetic diseases have been thought to be acquired as a result of sheer bad luck. However, recent advances in medical science have demonstrated the mechanisms of genetic disorders, which enable us to intervene with their occurrence and treatment. Today, gene therapy, once considered too risky, has become safer and can save the lives of patients with previously untreatable and lethal genetic diseases. However, the positive expectations from gene therapy are overshadowed by their extremely high prices. Thus, the duty of society in the provision of gene therapies has been frequently discussed. The discussions mainly focus on how to meet the genetic treatment needs of patients without violating the notion of justice and fairness in society. This study discusses the theoretical grounds for society's duty to compensate for genetic disease patients' disadvantages by providing them with appropriate genetic treatment. The main question is whether a fair and just system requires society to provide available lifesaving gene therapy to patients in need. The discussion is constructed on the crucial notion of the fair equal opportunity principle in a just system and the plausibility of including disadvantages emerging from bad luck in the natural lottery in the domain of justice.

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Perceived unfairness in teacher-student conflict situations: students’ point of view

Abstract

Student perceptions of injustice in the classroom can evoke destructive behavior, resistance, deception, aggression, and conflict escalation. Our study explores student experiences of unjust teacher behavior in educational settings. Students (N=99) were asked to remember a conflict they experienced during their studies. The conflict descriptions (N=78) were analysed and grouped according the type of perceived injustice (distributive, procedural, interactional) and 22 issues of unfair behaviour (Mikula et al., 1990). Our study revealed that perceived unfair grading, power demonstrations, and accusation were the most important predictors of teacher-student conflicts. Moreover students reported they experienced interactional injustice more frequently than they experienced distributive or procedural injustice.

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Organizational Justice and Turnover Intention among Medical and Non-Medical Workers in University Teaching Hospitals

-445 Cooper D. R & Schindler P. S (2009). Business Research Methods (9 th ed.). New Delhi, Davoudi S.M and Fartash K (2013). Turnover Intetions: Iranian employees, SCMS Journal of Indian Management, 10 (1), 89-99 McGraw Hill. Deutsch, M. (1975). Equity, Equality, and Need: What Determines Which Value Will Be Used as the Basis of Distributive Justice? Journal of Social Issues, 31,(3), 137-149 Eves F, Giilean G.M. & Celik S. (2014). Primary School Teachers’ Perceptions of Justice and Trust in Principals in Ankara, Turkey

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Moral Foundations of Welfare Attitudes: The Role of Moral Intuition and Reasoning in Pursuing Social Justice

Abstract

The article interconnects the research on welfare attitudes and welfare chauvinism with moral psychology in order to develop an interdisciplinary analytical approach designed for studying attitudes to welfare policies and potentially overcoming the divisions prevalent in many European democracies. It introduces Moral Foundations Theory (MFT) - an empirical approach to analysing intuitions, reasoning, and emotions constituting moral judgment - and outlines its understanding of competing versions of fairness and distributive justice. The potential contributions of MFT are exemplified on a case study situated in contemporary Slovakia which deals with two conflicting conceptions of fairness, as equity and as equality, embodied in the diverging attitudes towards an amendment to the Act on the Assistance in Material Need (2013). The article argues that MFT and related research programmes are irreplaceable components in an interdisciplinary study of the plurality of welfare policy attitudes. It also highlights the transformative potential of MFT and related research programmes in devising interventions aimed at changing (political) attitudes to welfare and reducing their polarisation.

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Why Should We Prevent a Global Anglo-American Life-World? A Democratic-Deliberative Answer

Abstract

Should English be promoted as a worldwide lingua franca for justice-related reasons? Philippe Van Parijs answers affirmatively in order to promote global distributive justice. In contrast, I argue that a rapid expansion of English could lead to one undesirable consequence that ought to be prevented: the globalization of an Anglo-American life-world that impoverishes democratic-deliberative debates. Inspired by John Stuart Mill, I will defend the idea that the more dominant the Anglo-American life-world is, the less diversity of life-worlds and, therefore, the less diversity of substantial voices in the global democratic-deliberative process there will be. It might be that more voices could be heard (because of the lingua franca), but with less substantial diversity of opinions. In that sense, the life-worlds (and language as an access key to them) have an instrumental value that enables plurality and better deliberative discussion. For that reason, I contend that there is a pro tanto reason to prevent the expansion of English as a lingua franca.

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The Organisational Justice as a Human Resources Management Practice and its Impact on Employee Engagement: The case of the Prefecture of Attica (Greece)

Abstract

Organisational justice is a key component in the practice of human resources management in any work environment. The aim of this research survey is to highlight the meaning and importance of organisational justice and its impact on employee engagement. To achieve this aim, except for the literature review, the survey examines the extent to which the distributive, procedural and interactional justice impact on work and organisational engagement, through a research in a certain Greek public organisation. As regards the statistical analysis of the research hypotheses, we used methods of the SPSS 17.00 statistical package. The results showed that the distributive justice significantly impacts on both types of engagement, while no effect was detected between procedural justice and the two types of engagement. The interactional justice was found to determine, partly, only the organisational engagement. The findings overwhelmingly verified the existing bibliographical references, resulting in a noteworthy empirical precedent which could contribute to the field concerning the impact that organisational justice exerts on certain aspects of organisational behaviour.

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