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* Serafim Seppälä, Professor of Systematic Theology and Patristics (Orthodox studies), Uni- versity of Eastern Finland. University of Eastern Finland, Philosophical faculty, PL 111, 80101 Joensuu, Finland, serafim.seppala@uef.fi. RES 11 (3/2019), p. 439-455 DOI: 10.2478/ress-2019-0031 The Concept of Deification in Greek and Syriac Serafim Seppälä* The early patristic authors dealt with the idea of deification in varying circumstances, in relation to different questions, and in more than one language. This article examines Syriac and Greek discourses and

translation: http://www.papalencyclicals.net/ben12/b12b-deus.htm . Billings JT (2005) United to God through Christ: Assessing Calvin on the Question of Deification. Harvard Theological Review 98(3): 315-34. Billings JT (2014) Catholic and Reformed: Rediscovering a Tradition. Pro Ecclesia 23(2): 132-46. Boersma H (2011) Heavenly Participation: The Weaving of a Sacramental Tapestry . Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans. Boersma H (2018) Seeing God: The Beatific Vision in Christian Tradition . Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans. Bonner G (1986) Augustine

Bibliography Billings JT (2005) United to God through Christ: Assessing Calvin on the Question of Deification. Harvard Theological Review 98(3): 315-34. Billings JT (2007a) Calvin, Participation and the Gift: The Activity of Believers in Union with Christ. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Billings JT (2007b) John Calvin: United to God through Christ. In Christensen MJ and Wittung JA (eds) Partakers of the Divine Nature : The History and Development of Deification in the Christian Traditions . Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, pp. 200-218. Caldwell III RW (2006

Knox Press. Hallonsten G (2007) Theosis in Recent Research: A Renewal of Interest and a Need for Clarity. In Christensen MJ and Wittung JA (eds) Partakers of the Divine Nature: The History and Development of Deification in the Christian Traditions . Madison, NY: Fairleigh Dickenson University Press, pp. 281-93. Harink D (2009) 1 & 2 Peter . Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos Press. Harsch L (2009) Were the First Baptists Sacramentalists? Journal of Baptist Theology and Ministry 6(1): 25-43. Holmes SR (2012) The Quest for the Trinity: The Doctrine of God in Scripture

Abstract

This article investigates two fundamental dimensions of André Scrima’s anthropology: his emphasis on the incomprehensibility of the human being, and his interest for the mystical life in spiritual experience. The author intertwines these aspects in a range of topics with the aim of approaching the nature of the human being, such as the access to God as presence, the deification or transfiguration of the human being, and the iconic character of human existence. I analyze the use of such terms like “participation” and “mixture,” as well as the imagery that depicts the union of the human and the divine. Finally, I underline the spiritual importance of the nomad as figure and hospitality as virtue, and interpret them in terms of human itinerancy and God’s mystical dwelling in the human person.

-385. Stăniloae D (1994) The experience of God . Brookline, MA: Holy Cross Orthodox Press. Williams A (1999) The Ground of Union: Deification in Aquinas and Palamas . New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Rapids, MI: Baker Academic. Mosser C (2002) The Greatest Possible Blessing: Calvin and Deification. Scottish Journal of Theology 55(*): n.p. Nyssa G (2000) On the Beatitudes. In Stuart George Hall (trans, ed) Gregory of Nyssa: Homilies on the Beatitudes: An English Version with Supporting Studies . Leiden: Brill. Nyssa G (2012) Gregory of Nyssa: Homilies on the Song of Songs , Norris RA (ed and trans). Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature. Thiselton AC (2000) The First Epistle to the Corinthians [NIGTC]. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.

Abstract

Amidst the politically-charged climate of seventeenth-century England, a small, but influential makeshift group of Baptist divines developed an eschatological system that both encouraged their congregations to greater holiness and threatened the very existence of the proto-denomination. Even as most of the nascent group of dissenting congregations known as Baptists sought acceptance by the more mainstream dissent, those divines who accepted this particular form of millenarianism garnered unwanted attention from the authorities as they pressed remarkably close to the line of radical dissidence. Three of those Baptist divines—Vavasor Powell, Hanserd Knollys, and Benjamin Keach—provide helpful insights both into the range of millenarianism adopted by this group of Baptists and into the legitimacy of the charges of radicalism. This article examines the published works of these three ministers, comparing their visions for the eschatological future and analyzing the charges of radicalism placed against them by their contemporaries.