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Business Performance in the Context of Corporate Culture

References: 1. DENNISON, D.R. 1990. Corporate Culture and Organizational Effectiveness . New York: John Wiley &Sons. ISBN 0-471-80021-X 2. FROST, William. 2005. ABCs of Activity Based Management. Lincoln: Iuniverse. ISBN 13-978-0-595-80328-6 3. ZÁVADSKÝ, Ján. 2005. Riadenie výkonnosti podnikových procesov. (Performance management business processes.) Banská Bystrica: UMB, EF v Banskej Bystrici, OZ Ekonómia. ISBN 80-8083-077-0

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Model Recommended Values of Corporate Culture for Industrial Companies in Slovak Republic

References 1. ARMSTRONG, M. 2007. Řízení lidských zdrojů. (Human resources management) Prague: Grada. ISBN 802-471-407-3 2. GYURÁK BABEĽOVÁ, Z., VAŇOVÁ, J. 2014. Crucial Role of Corporate Culture to Align Organizational Goals with Economic Success. The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management. Vol. 12, Iss. 4, pp. 241-250. ISSN 1479-4411 3. KACHAŇÁKOVÁ, A., NACHTMANNOVÁ, O., JONIAKOVÁ, Z. 2008. Personálny manažment (Personnel Management). Bratislava: Iura Edition. pp. 144-214. ISBN 978

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Strategy, Corporate Culture, Structure and Operational Processes as the Context for the Innovativeness of an Organization

-703. [29] Loewe P., Dominiquini J., 2006. Overcoming the barriers to effective innovation. Strategy & Leadership, No. 34(1), pp.24-31. [30] Lyons, R.K., Chatman, J.A., Joyce, C. K., 2007. Innovation in Services: Corporate Culture and Investment Banking. California Management Review, 50(1), pp.174-191. [31] Martins, E., Terblanche, F., 2003. Building Organisational Culture that Stimulates Creativity and Innovation. European Journal of Innovation Management, 6(1), pp.64-74. [32] Miller, D., Friesen, P.H., 1983. Strategy

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Development Trends in Motivation Factors Applied by Business Managers in Corporation

://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.12.916 . 15. Syafii, L. I., Thoyib, A., Nimran, U., Djumahir (2015). The Role of Corporate Culture and Employee Motivation as a Mediating Variable of Leadership Style Related with the Employee Performance (studies in Perum Perhutani) // Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Vol. 211, pp. 1142-1147. doi: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2015.11.152. 16. Šajbidorová, M. (2008). Leading Style as an Employees Motivation Equipment / In International Scientific Days 2008: Competitiveness and Economic Growth. European and national perspectives

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Relationship between job satisfaction and perception of manager’s behavior

Abstract

Job satisfaction is related to the match between an individual and the environment. This match gains special significance in the field of values. Behaviours of managers in a given organisation are the exemplification of values but also indicate what is important in a given culture. Since the requirements of corporate culture cause some unification of employees, it seems that for job satisfaction it will be important whether or not managers will ensure them individual treatment. Thus, the objective of the research conducted was to check what managers’ behaviours are most closely related to job satisfaction.

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Corporate Culture and Its Connection with External and Internal Public Relations

Corporate Culture and Its Connection with External and Internal Public Relations

The main aim of this article is to present the influence of corporate culture on company's stakeholders. This paper signalises the tendency in corporate communication with its internal and external publics. It is focused on two issues: corporate social responsibility and employer branding. Those two categories are consequences of corporate culture model.

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Weyerhaeuser: A Good Reputation Instilled in Culture

Abstract

The paper addresses the concept of Weyerhaeuser’s culture which was transformed as the result of mergers and implemented policies against recession. The culture, particularly their long-term vision and values played a crucial role in Weyerhaeuser’s company. Frederick Weyerhaeuser, founder of the firm, realized that a firm’s reputation was the most important asset. Significant increases in housing demand over 1997-2005 had led to an enormous pressure for faster deliveries and innovations in the construction industry. Weyerhaeuser decided to become global leader by transforming its culture and launching the iLevel concept7.

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Building diverse and inclusive organizational culture-best practices: A case study of Cisco Co.

Abstract

In management theory and business practice the dealing with a diverse workforce has played a leading role in recent years. In a globalizing economy companies recognized potential benefits of a multicultural workforce and tried to create more inclusive work environments. Unfortunately many of them have been disappointed with the results they achieved. The reason for this is that too little attention has been paid for the norms, values and behaviors involved. Given the fact that diversity is essentially about cultural norms and values, appropriate reflection work becomes a fundamental task to create a truly inclusive work environment where people coming out from diverse backgrounds feel respected and recognized. The paper focus on the challenge of building an inclusive diversity culture showing that a “culture of inclusion” has to be built on solid grounds. It shed light on the process of developing such a culture in CISCO corporation which serves as an example of a good practice in this respect.

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Culture as a barrier of knowledge sharing

Abstract

Management in last decades has seen knowledge sharing become a key tool for the success of a variety of institutions. Many international companies and other organizations have developed knowledge management programs as key to their future development strategies. There are number of international organizations that have identified knowledge sharing as one of their core management tools. Yet despite its growing popularity, knowledge sharing remains a complex and challenging task. This article discusses what cultural barriers can impede knowledge sharing processes

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Education as a spectral technology: Corporate culture at work in Ontario‘s schools

Abstract

This paper addresses the sweeping neoliberal reforms implemented in Ontario’s schools in 2000, and conceptualises them within the terms of ‘millennial capitalism’ (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2000). A close reading of secondary school curriculum documents and the umbrella policies that shape education from ages 5 to 18 years reveals how students are groomed to identify themselves as workers under construction. This is accomplished by mandating career education that defines lived experience as a ‘career’, articulates an identity for students as workers/producers, and dictates a direct relationship between education and the health of the economy. For students the professed advantages of millennial capitalism come from freedom and choice to navigate a post-secondary future in an abstract market that rewards those who respond to its highs and lows. Despite the drop-out ‘crisis’ that followed the initial reforms, and the next government’s efforts to remediate the damage done, ultimately corporatist/careerist mantras continue to haunt classrooms, shape education, and its aims and goals in Ontario. The analysis offered in this paper aims to help us better understand the resilience of the neoliberal agenda in the current global economic ‘crisis’, in light of ongoing calls for ‘value-for-money’ in delivering public services and overall competitiveness. Ontario’s education system has a reputation internationally as a high-level performer; this positioning in light of the anomalies presented by its policy and curriculum serves as a cautionary tale to countries that connect growth in GDP with the results of its children and youth on standardised tests. Further, it reveals the disparity between statistics at the macro level and life at the level of the classroom.

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